Tag: Mathematics

Meet top NAS students benefitting from expanded scholarship program


The best-of-the-best students in Natural and Applied Sciences programs were honored at an annual scholarship reception held Jan. 30. Twenty-five students were awarded a total of $31,150 in scholarships that nearly doubled last year’s total of $15,200. The scholarships recognized student achievement in academics, research, and overall excellence. The new scholarships introduced this year include the Todd and Julie Bartels Scholarship, the Chad Moritz and Beth Meyer Scholarship, and the Faith Technologies, Inc. Scholarship for Engineering Technology. (Next year, NAS will introduce five additional scholarships.) Students selected to receive awards are:
 Kristine Berry, Environmental Science major; Krystal Clark, Environmental Science; Matthew Malcore, Environmental Science and Environmental Policy and Planning; Ashley Morin, Biology; Molly Dederich, Mathematics; Christa Kananen, Geoscience; Angela Smet, Environmental Science major; Jessica Finger, Biology; Brianna Messner, Mathematics and Spanish; Michael Pietraszek, Biology; Roberta Reif, Biology; Jeremiah Shrovnal, Environmental Science; Gabriel Michaels, Mathematics; Tiffany Marshall, Pre-Professional Engineering Program; Hanne Guthrie, Environmental Science, Pre-Professional Engineering Program, and Spanish; Reed Heintzkill, Pre-Professional Engineering and Chemistry; Matthew Nichols, Individual Major (related to environmental engineering) and Chemistry; Caroline Nakanwagi, Chemistry; Jordan Marty, Biology; Christi Branham, Chemistry; Samuel Frisbie, Engineering Technology (Environmental) and Geoscience; Shannon Mackey, Environmental Science; Amanda Nothem, Chemistry; Michael Xie, Mathematics major. For more on each student and the scholarship received.

David Dolan obituary includes details on services, IAGLR scholarship

Prof. David Dolan passed away unexpectedly June 18, 2013.

David was born on September 12,1949, in Detroit, MI, the son of David Lawrence Dolan and Rosemary (Lytle) Dolan. He grew up in Detroit with his six siblings and attended schools there.

David earned a B.S. in chemical engineering and M.S. in environmental engineering at Notre Dame University, an M.A. in statistics at the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in mathematics at MacMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. He became a faculty member of the University Of Wisconsin–Green Bay in 1999, and a full professor in 2012. Prior to joining UW-Green Bay, he worked for many years as an environmental statistician for the US Environmental Protection Agency and the International Joint Commission. David’s primary focus was on the Great Lakes and his skills as a statistician contributed greatly to an understanding of the quality of their waters. He was the recipient of many awards during his tenure at UW-Green Bay and was an active member of the University Union. David thoroughly enjoyed teaching and it showed in the help he freely gave to many students, both graduate and undergraduate, with completing their projects and theses.

David was a quiet and thoughtful man, devoted to his wife and children. He was an avid bridge player and a fan of Notre Dame football and Detroit Red Wings hockey. He had discriminating taste in popular music. He also enjoyed Irish music, and was known to lift a pint of Guinness on occasion.

David is survived by his wife Mary, sons Andrew and Frederick, and four grandchildren, Ryan, Adrienne, Kiersten and Athena.

A memorial service to celebrate his life will be held on June 28, 2013, at the Mauthe Center on the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay campus, beginning at 1:00 pm. In lieu of flowers, the family plans to establish a graduate scholarship fund in David’s name through the International Association for Great Lakes Research, a scientific organization David belonged to and served in various positions, including the Board of Directors, since 1976. Checks made out to the association may be sent to 4840 S. State Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48108, with “David Dolan Memorial Scholarship” indicated on the check.

UW-Green Bay community mourns passing of David Dolan


Word has been received of the unexpected passing of award-winning faculty member Prof. David Dolan. He died Wednesday (June 18) at a Green Bay hospital. Arrangements are pending. A member of the Natural and Applied Sciences faculty, Dolan was the reigning recipient of the UW-Green Bay Founders Association Award for Excellence in Scholarship. He received the honor at an all-University convocation in August 2012 in recognition of the quality of his research and academic publications. Dolan joined UW-Green Bay in 1999. He taught statistics in the Mathematics program and was a member of the graduate faculty of the Environmental Science and Policy program. His research involved load estimation for water pollutants and also the detection of trends in environmental indicators. Dolan focused most of his work on the Great Lakes, especially Green Bay and Lake Erie. He helped numerous students, both graduate and undergraduate, to complete projects and theses. He was able to consistently attract research funding for this work, mostly from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Dolan joined the faculty here after serving as an environmental statistician for the International Joint Commission and the federal EPA for 27 years. He earned a B.S. in chemical engineering and M.S. in environmental engineering from the University of Notre Dame, an M.A. in statistics at the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in mathematics from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. Outside the classroom, Dolan was an avid bridge player and a lifelong Detroit Red Wings and Notre Dame football fan. He is survived by his wife, Mary, and their families. We will link to additional information as it becomes available.

UWGB undergrads demonstrate exceptional research

UW-Green Bay is a University well-known for providing undergraduate research experiences typically reserved for graduate school. These young researchers had two opportunities recently to demonstrate their exceptional work. Six UW-Green Bay undergrads shared their research on everything from nerdiness to cancer and online trust Wednesday (April 17), showing their stuff during the 10th annual Posters in the Rotunda event in Madison. This statewide research event lets UW System students share their work with leaders, legislators, school officials and each other — and UW-Green Bay again was well-represented. Our photo gallery (below) has some highlights of the day’s events — we also shot some video, which we hope to bring you soon.

Those students and more than 40 others displayed their outstanding scholarly and creative work for the campus community and general public on Wednesday April 10, at the University’s 12th annual Academic Excellence Symposium. Sixty-four students exhibited 48 projects including five vocal performances at the symposium, in the Phoenix Room of the University Union. It was a powerful demonstration of 360° of Learning (and teaching), in action. (See the photo gallery at the bottom of this post.) Congratulations to these students and their faculty leaders on their exceptional work.

The following UW-Green Bay students participated in Posters in the Rotunda. Here’s a bit more about them, their research and support:

Zhuxin “Zona” Fang, Jiaxing, Zhejiang, China, Secondary Mathematics Education major, will present “An International Approach to Examining the International Baccalaureate (IB) Mathematics Studies in the United States: Comparing a Topic in Statistics between IB and Chinese High School Mathematics Textbooks.” This research explores how IB programs may help U.S. students compete academically with students from other countries. Her faculty adviser is Assistant Prof. Susan Cooper.

Holly James, Green Bay, Human Biology and Biology major, will present “Luteolin Suppresses Daidzein Induced Cell Proliferation in Breast Cancer Cells,” which evaluates the referenced phytochemicals and has broader implications in regards to using dietary phytochemicals as chemotherapeutic agents. Her faculty adviser is Assistant Prof. Kimberly Baker.

Daniel Mueller, Kiel, Political Science and History major, will present “German Media and the 2012 U.S. Presidential Election: How Ideology, Regionalism, and Issue Coverage Shape the German Public Attitude toward U.S. Politics,” a project that explores how political and ideological orientation, regional coverage and other factors affected issue coverage of U.S. elections between July and mid-November 2012. His faculty adviser is Associate Prof. Katia Levintova.

Robyn Nielsen, Manitowoc, Environmental Policy and Planning major, will present the findings of the Brown County Waste Stream Committee’s yearlong work to establish a business plan and long-term strategy for redirecting waste from landfills by turning it into marketable materials, as part of a more environmentally sustainable local economy. Her faculty adviser is Associate Prof. John Katers.

Mai Chee Vang, Green Bay, Business Administration major, will present “Role of Cultural Congruence and Trust in Online Charitable Giving,” a study that compares two newly created website homepages that put images in a different order to manipulate the cultural congruence. Her faculty adviser is Assistant Prof. Gaurav Bansal.

Emily Vogels, Wrightstown, Psychology major, will present “Hidden Intelligence: Downplaying Intelligence in Social Settings,” which aims, via survey and regression analysis, to understand and predict why people might downplay their intelligence. Her faculty adviser is Prof. Regan A.R. Gurung.

POSTERS IN THE ROTUNDA

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 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013 UW-Green Bay students participate in Posters in the Rotunda, State Capitol building, Madison April 2013
Photos by Kelly McBride, Marketing and University Communication

12TH ANNUAL ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE SYMPOSIUM

Listed here are each project’s title, the student involved, accompanist (if applicable) and faculty advisers and their academic units.

01: Effects of Religious Priming on Attitudes Towards Alcohol Use
Paul Ahrens, Nicole Schultz
Dean Von Dras, Human Development
02: Applications in Mathematics Education
Courtney Nolan
Kim Desotell, Phuture Phoenix
03: Brown County Zero Waste
Jennifer Gumz, Robyn Nielsen
John Katers, Natural and Applied Sciences
04: Internship with Lakeside Foods
Tieraney Planasch
Le Zhu, Human Biology
05: Boys and Girls Club: After School Program
Nicole Helsel
Jenell Holstead, Human Development
06: Wild Blue Technologies Internship
Matt VandenBoomen
Jeff Benzow, Art and Design
07: Student Marketing and Promotions Coordinator
Logan Hendricks
Phil Clampitt, Information and Computing Science
08: Renewable Energy Internship, Wisconsin Public Service
Evan Van Lanen
Amy Wolf, Natural and Applied Sciences
09: Voyageur Magazine
Kayla Filen, Mitchell Henkelman, Nicole Lasee, Codie Richards, Reed G Schneider
Victoria Goff, Information and Computing Science
10: Eco-Reps
Melissa Kiela, Amanda Pyke
John Arendt, Environmental Management and Business Institute
11: Internship at Family Services Residential
Lauren Vieaux
Deirdre Radosevich, Human Development
12: Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation by Indole-3-Carbinol and Benzyl
Gabrielle Gaura, Danielle Goodrich
Kimberly Baker, Human Biology
13: Effects of Chronic Exercise on Resting Plasma Corticosterone Response
Chloe Krueger, Julia Rose Shariff
Amanda Nelson, Human Biology
14: Stigmatization of Eating Disorders: Gender and Athlete vs Non-Athlete
Anna Girdauskas
Kristin Vespia, Human Development
15: Human Trafficking
Nathan VerVelde
Katia Levintova, Public and Environmental Affairs
16: Academic Participation and Expression of Knowledge
Emily Vogels
Regan A.R. Gurung, Human Development
17: Personality, Perception of Faces, Rejection and Satisfaction in Online Dating
Jimmie Willing
Regan A.R. Gurung, Human Development
18: An Analysis of Pharmaceutical Waste Disposal Alternatives
Hilary Zanoni
David Helpap, Public and Environmental Affairs
19: Luteolin Suppresses Daidzein Induced Cell Proliferation in Breast Cancer Cells
Holly James, Jessica Pudelko
Kimberly Baker, Human Biology
20: The Art of Science
Spencer Karls
Sarah Detweiler, Art and Design
21: German Media and the 2012 US Presidential Election
Daniel Mueller
Katia Levintova, Public And Environmental Affairs
22: Bullying and Academics: Is There a Relationship?
Kaelee Heideman
Kristin Vespia, Human Development
23: Role of Cultural Congruence and Trust in
Online Charitable Giving
Kelton Dopp, Mai Chee Vang
Gaurav Bansal, Business Administration
24: Mental Illness Stigma as Function of Client Gender and Diagnosis
Kaitlyn Multhauf
Kristin Vespia, Human Development
25: Personality Influence on Irrational Beliefs and Organizational Commitment
Areanna Lakowske
David Radosevich, Human Development
26: Cross Cultural Content Analysis of Sexual Education
Rachel Gardner
Georjeanna Wilson-Doenges, Human Development
27: Phuture Phoenix – By the Numbers!
Marena Erickson, Stephanie Sielaff
Kimberly Desotell, Phuture Phoenix
28: An International Approach to Examining the International Baccalaureate (IB) Mathematics Studies in the United States: Comparing a Topic in Statistics between IB and Chinese High School Mathematics Textbooks
Zhuxin “Zona” Fang
Susan Cooper, Education
29: First Impressions: Do Glasses Matter?
Miranda DeMars, Amanda Novak, Amy Vaughn
Jennifer Lanter, Human Development
30: Story of the Wounaan People of San
Antonio, Panama: An Evolving Way of Life
Jake Eggert
Mike Draney, Alma Rodriguez-Estrada, Natural and Applied Sciences
31: Moll Flanders Text Adventure
Kelsey DuQuaine
Aeron Haynie, Humanistic Studies
32: Bound/Unbound: A Series of Nude Self Portraits in Encaustic and Mixed Media
Kerie Throw
Kristy Deetz, Art and Design
33: Edificational [A Series of Surreal Narrative Portraits]
Kerstin Torgersen
Kristy Deetz, Art and Design
34: Jane Eyre: An Illustrated Interlude
Patrick Mares
Aeron Haynie, Humanistic Studies
35: Playing God
Andrea Oldenburg
Sarah Detweiler, Art and Design
36: Leadership Styles and Expectations
Jena Richter
Phil Clampitt, Information and Computing Science
37: Self-Portraiture
Jessica Schmidt
Sarah Detweiler, Art and Design
38: The Physiologic Effects of Music on the Sympathetic Nervous System
Desiri Jantz, Cassandra Welch
Craig Hanke, Human Biology
39: How Lost in Austen are You?
Sammantha Gibson
Aeron Haynie, Humanistic Studies
40: A Comparison of Basal Area on the Mahon Tree Plot
Austin Carter, Sara Smith
Robert Howe, Amy Wolf, Natural and Applied Sciences
41: Mammal Assemblages at the Wabikon Forest Dynamics Plot
Jesse Weinzinger
Robert Howe, Amy Wolf, Natural and Applied Sciences
42: The Effects of Echinacea on Superoxide Anion Production by HL-60 cells, a Neutrophil Cell Line
Lauren Caruso, Jessica Stolfi
Brian Merkel, Human Biology
43: The Body as a Landscape
Megan Mueller
Sarah Detweiler, Art and Design
44: Biostratigraphy of Scolecondonts
Clarissa Justmann
John Luczaj, Natural and Applied Sciences
45: Student Honors Recital 2013 Performance
Ryan Braatz
Sarah Meredith, Music
46: Student Honors Recital 2013 Performance
Lindsay Cummings
Sarah Meredith, Music
47: Student Honors Recital 2013 Performance
Nicole Duhaime
Sarah Meredith, Music
48: Student Honors Recital 2013 Performance
Kevin St John
Sarah Meredith, Music
49: Student Honors Recital 2013 Performance
Kevin Wellens
Sarah Meredith, Music

Mary Slavek, accompanist for Ryan Braatz (45), Lindsay Cummings (46), Nicole Duhaime (47) and Kevin St. John (48)
Grant Colburn, accompanist for Kevin Wellens (49)

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 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013 12th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, UW-Green Bay, April 10, 2013
Photos by Holly Williams, photo intern, Marketing and University Communication

Outreach’s ‘Math Boot Camp’ preps students for math competency

The Division of Outreach and Adult Access is proud to announce a brand-new program for new students, designed to help them prepare to either take Math 94 or to test out of the Math Competency altogether. “Math Boot Camp” is a three-hour intensive math session which is available to ALL UW-Green Bay students who feel that they need some help in  preparing for this requirement. This session will take place on Saturday morning, June 1, in MAC 206 and will be taught by longtime UW-Green Bay math lecturer Bonnie Denis. The $35 registration fee includes hands-on expert instruction as well as all worksheets and a course instruction manual. Please encourage students to consider this session as they prepare for math at UW-Green Bay. Learn more about the Math Boot Camp online.

Math professor Davis earns Cofrin Professorship

Prof. Gregory Davis

Prof. Gregory Davis

Mathematics Prof. Gregory Davis of the Natural and Applied Sciences academic unit has been selected to hold the Barbara Hauxhurst Cofrin Professorship at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay for a five-year term through 2017. The honor was announced at the University’s annual fall convocation on Aug. 28.

Davis received a ceremonial medallion along with the title Barbara Hauxhurst Cofrin Professor at the semester-opening gathering of about 500 UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members hosted by Chancellor Tom Harden.

“In Gregory Davis, we have a very worthy recipient of the Cofrin Professorship,” Harden said in making the presentation. “He has a tremendous record of interdisciplinary, problem-focused research using mathematics — specifically, environmental modeling — to understand ecological problems. His teaching and service to his students and the larger institution have been exemplary.”

Davis joined the UW-Green Bay faculty in 1987 after receiving his Ph.D. in mathematics from Northwestern University, where he also earned his master’s degree. He completed his undergraduate studies at UW-Green Bay in 1981, receiving his bachelor’s in Science and Environmental Change with concentrations in mathematics and physics.

He currently serves as chairperson of the Natural and Applied Sciences unit and a faculty member in both the undergraduate and graduate programs. Among his research interests are mathematic modeling of biological and physical systems. He is known for a series of collaborations with faculty members on population dynamics, particularly birds including forest songbirds of Northern Wisconsin.

In 2010 he received the UW-Green Bay Founders Association Award for Excellence in the category of institutional development. He was credited with helping to shape policy and practice through service to groups responsible for guiding University research, graduate education, student conduct, instructional development and general education. He has also held the top elected positions in faculty government as chairperson of the University Committee and speaker of the Faculty Senate.

Named professorships are created through private gifts that support the study and research of a faculty member who has an outstanding record of scholarly accomplishment. The annual stipend associated with this particular professorship is for five years, but the recipient retains the title for life. Stipends are typically applied to research expenses or special projects benefitting students or service to the community.

The Barbara Hauxhurst Cofrin Professorship of Natural Sciences was established in 1985 by Dr. David and Mary Ann Cofrin, in memory of their late sister-in-law. Barbara Cofrin was a devoted mother, civic leader and supporter of education. Her children were instrumental in supporting the establishment of the Cofrin Memorial Arboretum on the UW-Green Bay campus. The Cofrin Professorship is specified for a full professor in the natural sciences who has a demonstrated commitment to scholarship and outreach.

Davis succeeds Prof. Robert Howe as current holder of the professorship, and is the fifth UW-Green Bay faculty member to be awarded the title. The others are Howe, Robert B. Wenger, Joseph M. Moran and Paul E. Sager.

UW-Green Bay currently has eight named professorships. Recipients are nominated by their peers and recommended for selection by a committee of senior faculty and academic leadership.

‘Math Fun Days’ arrive next week

There’s still time to inquire about “Math Fun Days 2011” organized by UW-Green Bay’s unit in Natural and Applied Sciences. The days-only program for high school students runs Monday through Wednesday next week (June 20-22). Scheduled are lectures and hands-on workshops from instructors in areas that include the mathematics of juggling, cryptography, mathematical modeling, 3D visualization and more. Know someone who might be interested?
More information.

Luck of the green? UW-Green Bay professor prefers statistical probabilities

Prof. Greg DavisHave you ever heard the saying, “you’ve got the luck of the Irish,” and believed it? Have you ever carried a lucky trinket in your pocket, say, a rabbit’s foot, four-leaf clover or special coin? Do you wear a lucky piece of clothing on the day of an exam or a presentation?

If so, perhaps you’re in the right place. Green is traditionally considered to be the luckiest color of them all, which is a good thing for all of us here at the University of Wisconsin-GREEN Bay.

At the same time, when you get the occasional unlucky parking ticket or have a rough day at school or work, can it be explained by “bad luck”? Did a black cat cross your path, did you break a mirror, or fail to knock on wood?

According to UW-Green Bay mathematics, science and statistics professor Greg Davis, “luck” is best viewed from a statistical perspective. It’s more of a mindset than anything else.

“When something happens that is unexpected,” Davis says, “you can either take the credit for it happening… accept that there is a distribution of outcomes and that you experienced a rare outcome or statistical interpretation… Or you were simply lucky one way or the other, just not realizing that statistics is a way of quantifying the experience.

“I don’t think that the expected result could be classified as bad luck as much as a bad choice.”

Statistics is the science of collecting, organizing, and interpreting data. Statistics include the plans for collecting data and the design of the experiments used and relies solely on experimentation and observation.

Davis and his faculty colleagues in math and statistics sometimes field calls from the news media when something improbable occurs. The public wants to know “what are the odds” that this event happened the way it did. Is there such a thing as good luck? Or is it always statistical probability?

The answer, replies Davis (who was lucky enough — actually, smart enough — to receive his own bachelor’s degree from UW-Green Bay in 1981) is that “luck” is mostly the result of chance. Arguably, it can also be affected by an individual’s attitudes and actions.

Superstitious beliefs and folklore are entertaining, yes. Reliable? No.

“From a statistical perspective, experiments with variability have a range of different outcomes and these outcomes often have different probabilities of occurrence. If an outcome occurs that has a very low probability of occurrence, then we can classify that outcome as being ‘lucky,’” Davis says.

“So a good question would be whether some people are luckier than others. I think that is true in the sense that some people seem to be associated with more rare events and that some people have the ‘skill’ to modify their own situation so that it appears that they are lucky.”

So, there you have it. If you’re out this St. Patrick’s Day chasing leprechauns or searching for a pot of gold, real or metaphoric, statistics indicate there’s a chance you’ll be lucky… or that you’ll be lucky to have any chance at all… but in any event…

Good luck!

– Story by UW-Green Bay student and editorial intern Daniele Frechette

‘Lesson Study’ grants awarded to six faculty teams

Prof. Regan A. R. Gurung, in his role as UW-Green Bay “Lesson Study” coordinator, has announced that six teams have secured Lesson Study Grants for the 2009-2010 academic year. The projects are funded by the UW System’s Office of Professional and Instructional Development (OPID). Full details will be posted later at the Center For Advancement of Teaching and Learning (CATL) website. In the meantime, here are faculty teams and topics:

• Illustrating core concepts relevant to geoscience, environmental science, and environmental policy and planning. Team members are John Luczaj (NAS, geoscience), Kevin Fermanich (NAS, geoscience), Matt Dornbush (NAS, biology), and Laurel Phoenix (PEA, geography).

• Optimizing the teaching and learning of APA style. Team members are Deirdre Radosevich and Chris Smith (Human Development), Jolanda Sallmann (Social Work), and Brian Sutton (HUS).

• On research design and statistical techniques. Team members are Jennifer Zapf, (Human Development, psychology) and Katia Levintova (Public and Environmental Affairs, political science).

• Fostering interdisciplinary thinking to strengthen workforce readiness. Team members are Doreen Higgins and Gail Trimberger (Social Work) and Susan Gallagher-Lepak (Nursing).

• Teaching about interdisciplinarity: a first-year seminar model. The grant was awarded to the First Year Seminar Committee.

• A lesson study on rational expressions. Team members are Theresa Adsit and James Meyer (both NAS, mathematics).

Lesson Study is a teaching improvement process in which a group of instructors jointly design, teach, observe, analyze, revise and document a single classroom presentation called a “research lesson.” The lesson has clear goals stated in terms of what students should know, what students should be able to do, how students should be affected or changed as a result of the lesson.