Tag: international

Thursday’s international roundtable on Nigeria to be led by Cole

The second Global Studies Roundtable of the fall semester is scheduled for 2 to 3:30 p.m. Thursday (Oct. 16) in Room 103 of the University Union. The focus is Nigeria, with discussion led by Juliet Cole, interim director of UW-Green Bay’s Institute for Learning Partnership. A native of Nigeria, Cole has made numerous trips over the years to visit family and stay current with developments in Africa’s most populous nation. The program is free and open to the public.

Hutchison will appear with Nobel Prize winners in Portugal

Sociologist Ray Hutchison, professor of Urban and Regional Studies, has been invited to speak at the Fórum do Futuro hosted by the Câmara do Porto (the municipality of Porto, Portugal). Other speakers at the Forum of the Future includes a number of other internationally known architects, artists and scientists, including the American artist Bob Wilson, architects (and Prtizker Architecture Prize winners) Jean Nouvel and Rafael Moneo, and two Nobel Prize winners in chemist Aaron Ciechanover and molecular biologist and DNA pioneer James Watson. The forum will be held in November at the Biblioteca Municipal Almeida Garrett in the Oporto Cristal Palace Gardens. In an effort “to bring the forum activities back to the everyday,” Hutchison’s talk will be titled a sociologia do futuro (Sociology of the Future).

Flax now, goats later? Harvest provides history and fiber lesson for UWGB students

top-flax-storyUW-Green Bay History and Fiber Arts students had some fun harvesting this year’s flax from the University Union plaza in September. Faculty members Alison Gates, Art and Design, and Heidi Sherman, History, spearhead the interdisciplinary project, which has begun to attract academic notice nationally (and internationally) and yielded invitations to present at workshops in Europe and elsewhere. For more about the project and process, as well as faculty hopes for new projects, see Gates’ blog post.

(Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)
 Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014     Harvesting flax, University Union plaza, UW-Green Bay, September 2014
Photos by Laurie Case

Alumni rising: Research sparks international career for Von Holzen

top-story-vonholzenIn a tradition that dates as far back as the 18th century, a decorated cow-drawn wagon carted newly honored Katie Von Holzen to the center of the Göttingen, Germany and dropped her off in front of City Hall. From there she climbed up next to the Gänseliesel statue, added a bouquet of flowers, and gave the “goose girl” a kiss on the cheek.

in-story-vonholzen-2This tradition is reserved only for a newly appointed “Dr.”

Van Holzen, a 2009 UW-Green Bay psychology graduate, had defended her Ph.D only a few hours earlier at Georg-August-Universität in Göttingen, where she studied bilingual and monolingual lexical and phonological development.

Von Holzen is now working in Paris, France as a post-doctoral researcher at the Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception at the Université Paris Descartes. Her research focuses on the importance of consonants and vowels for infants during lexical acquisition and processing.

So how does a small-town Wisconsin girl end up with a career in Paris, France? The answer is a lot of hard work and a lot of help along the way.

Von Holzen said she is indebted to several professors at UWGB, especially her mentor Prof. Jennifer Lanter. She spent three semesters in Lanter’s Language Learning Lab, which included research projects investigating toddler plural acquisition and how parents adapt their language to the environment and needs of children.

“My interest took off very, very quickly once I started in the Language Lab,” Von Holzen said. “I also took my first college level German class that semester. It was fascinating studying how toddlers understand and use language, while I, at the same time was struggling to learn a second language. It was unfair and amazing at the same time.”

Prior to that, Von Holzen spent two months at Dartmouth College as a summer research intern working in a social neuro-cognition lab with the help of UWGB Professors Regan Gurung and Kate Burns. She used fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) to look at the areas of the brain that light up when women rate pictures of men separately on their aesthetic and sexual attractiveness.

“The experience fueled my fascination with the brain and the things it can tell us if we ask the right questions,” Von Holzen said.

Von Holzen told her adviser, Prof. Burns, that she was interested in cognition, memory and language and asked if there was a project she could get involved in on campus. Burns, in turn, introduced her to Lanter and the Language Learning Lab.

“Working in her Language Learning Lab led me to discover my passion for the study of language acquisition and gain extensive experience in the field. I will always be grateful for her confidence in me, as well as her support while I was applying to graduate school,” Von Holzen said.

“The environment at UWGB really helped me figure out what I wanted to do in life that would make me happy. I can think of no greater preparation than that,” Von Holzen said.

“Although travelling is a definite perk, I would say that working on questions that I’m passionate about is definitely my favorite part of my job,” Von Holzen said. “When I’ve thought about doing anything else, I can’t imagine losing access to a lab where I can satisfy my curiosity on a daily basis.”

She was introduced to the Green Bay area during cherished time spent time at her aunt and uncle’s — Diane (Von Holzen) Mike Phillips — home in Green Bay. Both are 1977 UWGB graduates.

 

Photos, video, article: Visit by Chilean sustainability delegation

UW-Green Bay’s partnership with Chile’s Universidad del Desarrollo took another step forward earlier this spring with a visit to Green Bay by about 15 Chilean master’s degree students and faculty in sustainability management and industrial engineering. Hosted by Prof. John Katers of Natural and Applied Sciences, the delegation attended the Heating the Midwest conference and toured green companies including FEECO, ENCAP, the Green Bay municipal wastewater plant, and others. Their Chile-to-Wisconsin trip followed a 2013 visit to Santiago by a UW-Green Bay delegation led by Katers, who earned a Fulbright Specialist position for the purpose of pursuing an ongoing partnership on topics of sustainability, pollution control and waste management. Sorry we didn’t post all this earlier, but we have more including a link to the Chilean students’ short video recap of the trip, photos, and a Santiago newspaper article.

UW-Green Bay to host first-of-its kind international art symposium

UW-Green Bay will host a first-of-its-kind event June 2-4, when Lawton Gallery Curator Stephen Perkins and a colleague from France present “The Territories of Artists’ Periodicals,” an international symposium, on campus. The event seeks to provide a venue for dialogue between researchers, artists, publishers, archivists, librarians and others interested in artists’ periodicals and the issues and themes that make up their contents. Artists’ periodicals differ from traditional art periodicals in that the periodical itself becomes the artistic medium, rather than being merely the site for the reproduction of artworks, Perkins said. Perkins’ co-organizer for the event is Marie Boivent of the Universite of Rennes, France, and attendees and presenters hail from Italy, the United Kingdom and across the U.S. The cost for the three-day symposium, the first of its kind devoted to artists’ periodicals in the U.S., is just $25. Our news release has more.

In the news: More coverage for Habitat’s Philippines trip

We’ve told you here before about the UW-Green Bay Habitat for Humanity chapter’s plans to build homes this summer in typhoon-ravaged Bicol, Philippines. The group’s efforts were featured earlier this month on WBAY, Channel 2, and now the Wausau Daily Herald has done its own story featuring two graduates of Central Wisconsin’s Marathon High School. Sarah Busko and Jordan Fraser are two of the 10 UW-Green Bay students planning to make the trip, along with Habitat adviser and Dean of Enrollment Services Mike Stearney. “We are literally going halfway around the world,” Busko told Daily Herald reporter Keith Uhlig. “We will be staying and working in a location just 15 degrees north of the equator. But the need there is so great, and the opportunity is so amazing. We were the only college chapter in the U.S. to step up to this invitation. Our take on it was, go big or go home.” You can read the full article, here.

Update on fundraising

Thanks to the generous support of families, friends, the Green Bay community at large, and especially the University community, the UW-Green Bay Collegiate Chapter of Habitat for Humanity is a little more than halfway to its fundraising goal for a Global Village trip to the Philippines in August. Dean of Enrollment Services Mike Stearney will accompany 10 students on a journey to Bicol, Philippines July 31- Aug 8. There they will join university students from Japan and the Philippines to contribute to the larger Habitat-Philippines goal of providing homes for 30,000 Filipino families in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan. With just about one month left, the students still need to raise more money for this service trip. Check out their video story and fundraising website.

Faculty note: Morgan in Italy

Eric J. Morgan, assistant professor in Democracy and Justice Studies, recently returned from Italy, where he presented a paper in Venice at the international conference on Spy Chiefs: Intelligence Leaders in History, Culture, and International Relations. Morgan’s paper, “A Dangerous Place from Which to View the World: The Enigma of Control in the Novels of John le Carré,” will be featured along with other presentations from the conference in a two-volume collection to be published by Georgetown University Press. Held in the city where modern espionage was born, the conference featured a keynote speech by Tony Mendez, the former CIA technical operations officer and inspiration for the Academy Award-winning film, “Argo.” Mendez and his wife, Jonna, also a former CIA operative, spoke about the successful “Canadian Caper” during the Iran Hostage Crisis and their thoughts and reflections on the truths and un-truths of the critically-acclaimed film.

Highlight of a semester abroad: meeting the president

Associate Prof. Cristina Ortiz Ceberio reports that one of our standout students in the Spanish program, Tanner V. Vodvarka — the 2014 recipient of the program’s Award in Applied Use of the Language — is enjoying a productive semester abroad. Based in Bucamaranga, Colombia, the UW-Green Bay student had occasion recently to meet Juan Manuel Santos, president of the South American nation. Vodvarka’s reaction? A tongue-in-cheek “No big deal,” reports his professor.