Tag: Humanistic Studies

Humanistic Studies presents, ‘Wondrous Boccaccio’ Oct. 19

Green Bay Film Society and UWGB Humanistic Studies will be present the Italian film Wondrous Boccaccio at 7:00 p.m., Wednesday, Oct.19 in the auditorium of the Neville Public Museum as part of the International Film Series. The film is an adaptation of Boccaccio’s 14th century masterwork The Decamerone and is directed by the acclaimed Taviani […]

Faculty note: Coury publication

David Coury (Humanistic Studies/German) published an article on the German-Iranian writer Navid Kermani, entitled “Kafka and the Quran: Patriotism, Culture and Post-National Identity” in a monograph devoted to Kermani’s works published in Germany. The article deals with Kermani’s literary and cultural influences from both Germany and Iran and how they have come to inform his […]

Faculty note: Kevin Kain publication

UWGB senior lecturer Kevin Kain (Humanistic Studies) has his work, “Working Among the Pagans ‘The Questions of Kirik (ca 1130-1156)’” published in Eastern Orthodox Christianity The Essential Texts (Yale University Press: New Haven, 2016, Geffert and Stavrou). The book offers the first comprehensive source reader on the Eastern Orthodox church for the English-speaking world. Designed […]

Humanistic Studies Faculty Forum next week

Two faculty members from Humanistic Studies will be presenting their work from 2 to 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30 in Room 103 of the University Union. Prof. Hye-kyung Kim will present, “Neo-Confucian Metaphysics of Gender” and Prof. Vince Lowery will present, “Finding the Crack in the ‘Golden Door': Investigating the Turn-of-the-Century Southern Immigration Movement.” Please […]

Faculty notes: Coman, Groessl, Rector and Sherman are teaching scholars

The UW-Green Bay Teaching Scholars Program will kick off again next week with four new scholars: Ioana Coman (Information and Computing Science), Joan Groessl (Social Work), Michael Rector (Music) and Heidi Sherman (Humanistic Studies). The Teaching Scholars Program, which started in 1999, brings together faculty and instructional staff from across campus to talk about teaching challenges, to […]

Faculty note: Voelker, Gurung co-present

David Voelker (Humanistic Studies and History), who begins his fourth year as co-director of the Wisconsin Teaching Fellow & Scholars program, co-led a workshop last week with Regan Gurung (Psychology and Human Development) at UW Faculty College called, “Reflective Discussion and Transformational Learning.” See the Faculty College 2016 page for details.

Faculty publication: Rebecca Nesvet

Rebecca Nesvet (English) has a new publication: “Teaching Romanticism XVI: Romanticism and the City, Part I,” written with Dr. Catherine Redford (Hertford College, Oxford University) and Dr. Kellie Donovan-Condron (Babson College), at Romantic Textualities. Nesvet discusses teaching the role of St. Petersburgh in FRANKENSTEIN and Green Bay’s own unique, evocative urban snowscapes.

‘Problem of Evil’ is Philosophy Café topic – April 13

A tornado flattens a small town and Brian Sutton concludes that God might not exist. With the tragic warfare and strife these days, it is as good a time as any to ask whether so much suffering can be considered as evidence against God’s existence. UWGB Prof. Sutton of Humanistic Studies and English composition will help […]

Faculty note: Sherman presents essay at Harvard

Heidi Sherman (Humanistic Studies) presented the essay (written with Arnold Lelis) “Gorm’s Travels to Gardariki in the 920s” at the invitational conference “Portraits of Medieval Eastern Europe” held at Harvard University April 8, 2016.  The workshop essays will be published in a collection for undergraduate medieval and world history students, which follows the volume, Portraits […]

Faculty note: Lowery publications

The winter issue of the Journal of American History features an article by Vince Lowery (Humanistic Studies/History). The article, titled “‘Another Species of Race Discord’: Race, Desirability, and the North Carolina Immigration Movement,” explores the debate about North Carolina’s short-lived immigration program (1907-1909). Lowery argues that whites in eastern North Carolina, far from being immigration restrictionists, were […]