Tag: Humanistic Studies

UW-Green Bay honors top faculty, staff with 2015 Founders Awards

founders-award-winners-postThe University of Wisconsin-Green Bay has recognized its top faculty and staff members with 2015 Founders Awards for Excellence. The award winners, honored at the annual UW-Green Bay Faculty and Staff Convocation Wednesday morning, Aug. 26, are:

Teaching — Associate Prof. Georjeanna Wilson-Doenges
Scholarship — Prof. Matt Dornbush
Community Outreach — Prof. John Luczaj
Institutional Development — Associate Prof. Denise Bartell
Academic Support — Mike Kline
Classified Staff — Amanda Wildenberg
Collaborative Achievement — The Digital and Public Humanities Project

Posing in the photo, above, standing from left are Wilson-Doenges, Luczaj, Dornbush and Bartell. Seated are Wildenberg and faculty members representing the Digital Humanities Project, Associate Profs. Chuck Rybak and Caroline Boswell. Not pictured: Mike Kline.

The awards were presented before an audience of more than 400 in the Phoenix Room of the University Union. Made possible by private philanthropic support, the awards program has been an annual fixture at UW-Green Bay since 1975. Honorees are selected by a campuswide committee from among nominations submitted by faculty, staff and others.

Wilson-Doenges, the recipient of the Founder’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, is an associate professor of Human Development and a specialist in environmental psychology and best practices in neighborhood planning and urban design. The award citation credited her with effectively connecting with students, regardless of major, in courses both online and in-person, and bringing energy not only to her classroom but to her work with students on internships, independent studies, and honors projects. One nominator said her enthusiasm for her subject has the ability to make even the statistical concept of standard deviation “riveting.” Wilson-Doenges joined the UW-Green Bay faculty in 1995 after earning her Ph.D. from the University of California-Irvine.

Dornbush, recipient of the award for scholarship, was recognized for his work as a professor of biology with the Natural and Applied Sciences academic unit. He has made a priority of involving both graduate and undergraduate students in his research projects where possible, and has been successful in winning outside grants to support that research. His primary interests involve the role of native plant restorations in improving ecosystems, including the potential use of native tallgrass for bio-energy purposes, and the restoration of wild rice, bulrush and wild celery stands in the lower bay. Dornbush joined the UW-Green Bay faculty in 2005 after earning his doctoral degree in ecology at Iowa State University. He recently joined the academic affairs administrative team at UW-Green Bay as the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Professional Development and Grants, and Director of Graduate Studies.

The award citation for Geoscience professor Luczaj, a member of the Natural and Applied Sciences faculty, called the Founders Award for Excellence in Community Outreach a perfect fit for a faculty member who is “an asset to UWGB as a researcher, instructor and community ambassador in the field of geology.” An authority on the geology and bedrock of Northeastern Wisconsin and related groundwater issues, Luczaj has provided guidance to technical groups on vital groundwater issues and advised varied stakeholders on aquifer protection strategies. In addition to working with UWGB students, he has connected with the community through geoscience presentations to family and K-12 groups as well as to UWGB Learning in Retirement audiences. He holds a Ph.D. in geology from Johns Hopkins and joined the Green Bay faculty in 2005.

Bartell, honored in the category of Institutional Development, was recognized for her efforts in ensuring the success of new and continuing students and the larger University. Bartell is an associate professor of psychology in the Human Development academic unit. In recent years she has assumed leadership in campuswide efforts to improve student retention and graduation rates, particularly for first-generation students and those who are from under-represented groups or who face special challenges. She is founder and program director for the Phoenix GPS Program, which has identified “high-impact” practices to help students thrive. (The practices include encouraging greater campus involvement, mentoring, effective study skills and active/engaged learning experiences for newcomers.) Bartell joined UW-Green Bay in 2002 after earning her Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Sciences at the University of Texas.

Kline received the Founders Award for Excellence in Academic Support in recognition of his success in fostering, according to the award citation, “a department culture where academic success, not just completion, is an uncompromising priority.” Kline works in Phoenix Athletics administration as assistant AD of Compliance and Student Welfare. A 1988 graduate of UW-Green Bay, he landed the position of Phoenix cross-country coach while still a student-athlete in 1987. In 1999 he accepted additional duties as academics coordinator for all Phoenix teams. In the years since, the program has posted at least 31 consecutive semesters of cumulative GPAs of 3.0 or better, had a series of all-league and even all-America academic honorees, and had individual teams rank among the best in America in terms of academic performance. Nominators described Kline as “dedicated” “tireless” and “passionate” about encouraging academic and career success.

Wildenberg, recipient of the Founder’s Award for University Staff , is a university services associate in the Dean of Students Office. Nominators praised her customer-service orientation, good humor and cool under pressure in interacting with a clientele as varied and diverse as the University itself — students, parents, faculty, staff, senior administrators and others. She takes a lead role in coordinating a major, Universitywide program that serves almost a thousand new students and their families annually. The award citation also mentioned her technological skills, involvement in staff governance and efforts to “make UW-Green Bay a better place to work.” Wildenberg, who earned her bachelor’s at UW-Milwaukee, joined the UW-Green Bay staff in 2008.

The Digital and Public Humanities Project, led by Associate Profs. Chuck Rybak and Caroline Boswell of the Humanistic Studies faculty, earned the Founders Award in the category of Collaborative Achievement. The project, which began with creation of a “digital commons” at UW-Green Bay, relies on modern technology to greatly expand opportunity for sharing the humanities — ancient and modern languages, literature, philosophy, religion, history and the visual and performing arts — rather than distract from, or diminish interest, as some might expect in what is often characterized as an age of shortened attention spans. One nominator wrote of Rybak and Boswell, “by bringing students into this field (they have) opened new doors that will lead not only to new employment opportunities, but new ways to engage in lifelong interdisciplinary learning.” The project is credited with helping students avail themselves of new digital technologies, advance their skill sets and also make the field more accessible to the public at large. Boswell, a historian, joined the UW-Green Bay faculty in 2008 after earning her Ph.D. at Brown University. Rybak, a professor of English and creative writing, is a widely published poet who received his Ph.D. at the University of Cincinnati.

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Faculty note: 
Heidi Sherman

Heidi Sherman of Humanistic Studies has published “The Tooth Blades of Medieval Novgorod,” in K. Grömer and F. Pritchard (eds.) 2015: Aspects of the Design, Production and Use of Textiles and Clothing from the Bronze Age to the Early Modern Era. She presented her research The North European Symposium for Archaeological Textiles in May 2014 in Hallstatt, Austria, and the Archaeolingua Main Series 33. Budapest 2015.

Faculty note: Aldrete publication


History Prof. Gregory S. Aldrete of Humanistic Studies had an article published in the August issue of the Spanish journal Desperta Ferro: Arqueología & Historia. It is a special issue on the lower classes of ancient Rome, with articles from scholars in France, Spain, England, and the United States. Aldrete’s article is titled “La voz del pueblo. Clases bajas y violencia políticamente motivada,” which translates as, “The Voice of the People: The Lower Classes and Politically Motivated Violence.”

Clif Ganyard is new Associate Provost

post-ganyardUW-Green Bay Prof. Clifton Ganyard has been named the University’s Associate Provost for Academic Affairs. He assumed his new duties Aug. 10.

Ganyard, associate professor of Humanistic Studies and most recently chair of the History program, was selected following an internal search. He succeeds former Associate Provost Gregory Davis, who was promoted to interim provost and vice chancellor in May.

In his new administrative role Ganyard reports to Davis and is responsible for helping coordinate activities that promote an enriching academic experience for students, and for providing leadership for programs that support student learning and instruction.

The Associate Provost plays a role in oversight of academic program review implementation, curriculum development and data analytics; assessment and testing services; institutional accreditation; institutional research; inter-institutional academic agreements; international education programs; and commencement.

Ganyard was the 2014 recipient of a prestigious UW System Board of Regents Teaching Excellence Award. He joined the UW-Green Bay faculty in 1997 and has taught more than two dozen different courses for Humanistic Studies, History and Global Studies. His areas of specialization include modern European, German and Japanese history and culture, Western civilization and European intellectual history.

Ganyard has numerous publications to his credit, including “Artur Mahraun and the Young German Order: An Alternative to National Socialism in Weimar Political Culture” (2008), as well as a number of scholarly reviews. Ganyard’s many awards in addition to the Regents award include UW-Green Bay Research Scholar, Grants in Aid of Research, Teaching Enhancement and Teaching Fellow honors, as well as UW System and Beloit Center for Language Studies grants, among others. In 2010, Ganyard earned the UW-Green Bay Founders Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Ganyard earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees from the State University of New York at Buffalo.

Aldrete returns from talk on Linothorax at international conference in London

History Prof. Gregory S. Aldrete of the Humanistic Studies faculty is just back from London and an international conference called “Greek and Roman Armor Day,” hosted by the University of London and sponsored by the Hellenic and Roman Societies. He spoke about the UW-Green Bay Linothorax Project and displayed a reconstructed suit of lightweight linen armor of the type that helped Alexander’s armies dominate the ancient world. The half dozen speakers were from England, Scotland, the U.S., Germany, the Netherlands, and Israel. They addressed effectiveness, production, wearability, enemy tactics and weapons, and developments over time.

It’s official: Sutton now a published playwright


Congratulations to Associate Prof. of Humanistic Studies Brian Sutton, whose original musical comedy Searching for Romeo is now officially published by Stage Rights Press and available at the Createspace Store and other online portals including Amazon. Sutton received a contract for his play after its five-show run at the New York Musical Theatre Festival in 2014. He has continued to tinker with the material since he premiered the piece in July 2012 at the Jean Weidner Theatre at the Weidner Center on campus. The comedy re-imagines Shakespeare’s story of Romeo and Juliet from the perspective of the “losers,” Paris and Rosaline, who achieve what eternally eludes the more famous couple: a happy ending. Although Sutton’s academic specialty is neither creative writing, theatre nor music, colleagues praised his early drafts of both script and music, and encouraged him to produce the show. New York City critics who saw Romeo at the festival predicted it could do well as a high school, college or community theatre production. (Sutton notes that the script offered for purchase does not include audio of the show’s music; if potential buyers at UWGB or elsewhere want to hear the songs as performed, he’ll email mp3 recordings as attachments.)

Sherman presents with Viking specialists worldwide

Heidi Sherman presented the paper, “Staraia Ladoga and the Emporia Theses: The Anatomy of a ‘Non-Place’ in Viking-Age Russia,” at Yeast for Changes: Vikings and their Impact on Medieval Europe, May 21. The conference, which brought together Viking specialists from more than a dozen European countries was sponsored by The Institute of Archaeology, Wrocław, Poland.

UW-Green Bay finishes well at Bellin Run


A total of 54 employees, friends and family participated on the UW-Green Bay team as part of the 2015 Bellin Run Corporate Challenge. Overall, UWGB was 10th out of 61 Corporate Challenge teams. (Incidentally, fast finishers included lecturer Michael Holstead of Humanistic Studies who covered the 6.2 miles in 39 minutes and Lea Truttmann of Student Life, 49 minutes and change.) For more on UW-Green Bay finishers, go to the fine HR blog.

Regents OK tenure for 10 UW-Green Bay professors


The University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents approved promotions and tenure for UW-Green Bay faculty members during the board’s meeting June 4 and 5 at UW-Milwaukee. Those promoted from assistant professor to the rank of associate professor with tenure are:
Tohoro Francis Akakpo, Social Work
Hernan Fernandez-Meardi, Humanistic Studies
T. Heather Herdman, Nursing
Minkyu Lee, Art and Design
Deirdre Radosevich, Human Development
Courtney Sherman, Music
Alison Stehlik, Art and Design
Mussie Teclezion, Business Administration
Gail Trimberger, Social Work
Le Zhu, Human Biology

Seven earn promotion to full professor


The UW System Regents also approved moving the following individuals from associate professor to the senior rank of full professor:

Lucy Arendt, Business Administration
Mathew Dornbush, Natural and Applied Sciences
Susan Gallagher-Lepak, Nursing
Catherine Henze, Humanistic Studies
John Luczaj, Natural and Applied Sciences
Bryan Vescio, Humanistic Studies
Amy Wolf, Natural and Applied Sciences.

Our news release includes a short bio on each of this year’s faculty members advancing to full-professor status.