Tag: Human Biology

Bartel posts great time at Boston


Former Green Bay Phoenix cross-country standout Callie Bartel (Human Biology, class of ’09), a Prevea assistant athletics trainer assigned to Phoenix Athletics, beat last year’s time by nearly 10 minutes in finishing Monday’s Boston Marathon in 3:04:59, good enough to place 3,551 overall and a highly respectable No. 239 in the women’s division of the race that attracts marathoners from around the world.

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Other marathon results — Actually, it’s a small world, Boston-wise. Finishing a few minutes and places behind Bartel in the women’s division was Sarah Mahaney, age 33, who happens to be the daughter of our own Jan Snyder of the Provost’s Office. Mahaney finished her first Boston marathon (and only second 26.2-miler ever) in 3:07:22, good for women’s place 307. And, finally, Bob Blihar, an applications director with CIT, ran the inaugural Oshkosh Marathon over the weekend and shaved 28 minutes off his previous best and won his 50+ age group in 3:54:18. Congratulations, all.

Bartel to compete at Boston


It’s the third Monday in April — Patriots’ Day as it’s known in Boston — and the occasion of the annual Boston Marathon. So far, we’ve heard of at least one UW-Green Bay runner who will be competing. Former Phoenix cross-country standout Callie Bartel (Human Biology, Class of ’09) is returning to the race after putting up a 3:13:03 last year, good enough for a very strong 442nd among the women’s finishers on a day when more than 30,000 total runners crossed the line. Bartel is a Prevea assistant athletics trainer assigned to Phoenix Athletics.

Green Bay’s Mauel earns Horizon academic/athletic honors

The Horizon League announced its 2014 Fall Academic All-League Teams on Friday. A total of 52 student-athletes from five fall sports were honored in balloting by the League’s faculty athletics representatives and sports information directors. Representing Green Bay and being placed on the Academic All-League Team for cross country was junior Sarah Mauel of Green Bay. Mauel is fresh off one of the best seasons in program history, highlighted by a sixth-place finish in the Horizon League Championship meet. A Human Biology major, she carries a 3.75 cumulative grade-point average. Read more.

Four to represent UWGB at Healthcare Case Competition

Four students have been selected to represent UW-Green Bay at the Interprofessional Healthcare Case Competition sponsored by the Wisconsin Area Health Education Center (AHEC). The team of students was given a healthcare case study and required to conduct an analysis of interprofessional efforts related to patient care. After submission of an executive summary and budget, the team was selected to move on to the next part of the competition, which involves presenting findings to a panel of healthcare judges in Wisconsin Dells in January. The team will be competing for a $3,000 first-place cash prize. Students are: Anita Frankhauser, team captain (Human Biology – Emphasis in Nutritional Sciences/Dietetics), Stephanie Hessler (Healthcare Information Management Technology), Amanda Hoffman (BSN Program), and Alysia Wiley (BSN Program).

Sandmires add to decades of philanthropy with $1 million gift for scholarships

In case you missed it in our Log Extra newsletter: UW-Green Bay’s longest-running donors have stepped up big-time with a record-tying $1 million gift for student scholarships. Dr. Herbert and Crystal Sandmire’s donation will support students who intend to pursue a career in medicine or related medical fields, and will enhance a legacy of generosity that dates back 46 years. “This generous gift will provide a tremendous boost for our Human Biology program and related areas, which are helping to prepare the medical professionals of tomorrow,” said Chancellor Gary L. Miller. “Our regional economy depends on training and equipping more doctors and other professionals to provide the best care possible for the people of Northeastern Wisconsin.” The Sandmire gift ties a record for UW-Green Bay’s largest-ever single scholarship donation. In 2008, the family of Capt. Craig A. Mueller gave $1 million in scholarships, in accordance with the late alumnus’ wishes. The donation also comes at an important juncture for the future of healthcare in the region, as UW-Green Bay is a partner institution for a new Medical College of Wisconsin satellite campus that will be housed at St. Norbert College in De Pere. For more.

Longest-running UW-Green Bay donors give record-tying $1 million for scholarships

Herbert and Crystal Sandmire

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s longest-running donors are enhancing a decades-long legacy of generosity with a $1 million scholarship gift for students who intend to pursue a career in medicine or related medical fields.

Dr. Herbert and Crystal Sandmire’s gift ties a record for the University’s largest-ever single scholarship donation. In 2008, the family of Capt. Craig A. Mueller gave $1 million for scholarships, in accordance with the late alumnus’ wishes.

Established in 1987, the Herbert F. and Crystal J. Sandmire Scholarship is awarded to continuing UW-Green Bay students who plan to enter the medical field. The pair’s latest gift will provide perhaps dozens of additional scholarships annually, helping more pre-med and other students prepare to meet a critical regional need, said UW-Green Bay Chancellor Gary L. Miller.

“This generous gift will provide a tremendous boost for our Human Biology program and related areas, which are helping to prepare the medical professionals of tomorrow,” Miller said. “Our regional economy depends on training and equipping more doctors and other professionals to provide the best care possible for the people of Northeastern Wisconsin.”

The Sandmires’ gift comes at an important juncture for the future of healthcare in the region, Miller added. UW-Green Bay is a partner institution for a new Medical College of Wisconsin satellite campus that will be housed at St. Norbert College in De Pere.

“Many of our students wish to remain in the area, and the new MCW campus will allow them to do that,” Miller said. “Herb and Crystal’s generosity will help these students pursue their dreams, which truly benefits us all.”

UW-Green Bay records identify the Sandmires as having the longest uninterrupted string of annual giving — 46 years — among the thousands of private individuals who have supported the University and its students throughout the years. An award-winning doctor of obstetrics and gynecology, Dr. Sandmire was a UW-Green Bay community lecturer in Human Biology from 1968 to 1989. Crystal Sandmire, a University alumna who earned her Communication and the Arts degree in 1980, was a charter member and officer of the UW-Green Bay Founders Association. The Sandmires received UW-Green Bay’s highest community honor, the Chancellor’s Award, in 2006.

UW-Green Bay has made a positive contribution to healthcare in the area, Herb Sandmire said.

“Based on my affiliation with UW-Green Bay, and as an instructor in the college of human biology,” he said, “I have always been impressed with the quality of the institution’s faculty and the many students who have gone through the laboratory instruction and pursued careers in the health sciences or medicine.”

UW-Green Bay helps celebrate new home for Medical College of Wisconsin

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay was among the partners celebrating the new home of the Medical College of Wisconsin Green Bay (MCW-Green Bay) satellite campus at a media event Thursday, Oct. 23 on the St. Norbert College campus in De Pere.

“We are very excited to be a community and university partner for MCW-Green Bay,” said Scott Furlong, UW-Green Bay Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences. “Our faculty members are looking forward to the opportunities to teach within the program and share these interactions with our undergraduate student population.”

The partnership also provides opportunities for students who are seeking a medical education and wish to remain in Northeastern Wisconsin, said Furlong, who was on hand for Thursday’s event.

“Our Human Biology program has a strong reputation of preparing students for medical school and other medical careers,” he said. “UW-Green Bay is looking forward to other programmatic opportunities within the health care field that this partnership provides.”

MCW-Green Bay will host the first cohort of 20 to 25 students beginning in July of 2015. UW-Green Bay is a proud partner with a history of preparing pre-medical students within the Human Biology program, officials said. Among the distinguished UWGB alumni who also graduated from UWGB are Dr. Joe Carroll ‘97 and Dr. Marc Biedermann ’05.

Carroll co-directs the Medical College of Wisconsin’s Advanced Ocular Imaging Program and is an Associate Professor in the departments of Ophthalmology, Biophysics, and Cell Biology, Neurobiology and Anatomy. He was among the first to use a technology called adaptive optics to view the living retina at a cellular level, and he is credited with important breakthroughs in the study of color blindness. Carroll is a specialist in retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosis. He returned to UW-Green Bay to deliver the May 2014 commencement address.

Biedermann is an emergency medicine doctor in Portage, Wisconsin and is one of three doctors at Divine Savior Healthcare specializing in Emergency Medicine. Biedermann graduated from MCW in 2009 and completed his residency with the University of Wisconsin Emergency Medicine Residency

The MCW-Green Bay Campus will assist in the effort to overcome a shortage of Wisconsin physicians. About 400 new physicians graduate annually from Wisconsin’s two medical schools, MWC and the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine. More than 7,000 students already have applied to the MCW medical school for matriculation in August 2015. Seven hundred of the applicants are Wisconsin residents, 1,800 students have indicated an interest in attending MCW-Green Bay, and 67 Wisconsin-based applicants have indicated a preference in the MCW-Green Bay campus.

The MCW-Green Bay campus will give students looking to attend medical school another option that may better fit their lifestyle, officials say. “Learn. Live. Care. Cure.,” the MCW slogan, is supported by the design of the Green Bay campus. According to the MCW-Green Bay Campus Dean, Matthew Hunsaker, the state-of-the-art school model uses time more efficiently by eliminating a summer break and cuts down the cost of earning a medical degree for students.

More information about the Medical College of Wisconsin-Green Bay is available online

(Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)
 Medical College of Wisconsin-Green Bay holds open house, October 23, 2014   Medical College of Wisconsin-Green Bay holds open house, October 23, 2014  </a Medical College of Wisconsin-Green Bay holds open house, October 23, 2014   Medical College of Wisconsin-Green Bay holds open house, October 23, 2014   Medical College of Wisconsin-Green Bay holds open house, October 23, 2014
Photos by Sue Bodilly, Marketing and University Communication

UW-Shariff: Family follows scholarly advice

top-story-shariffIf teaching at the same institution for 44 years isn’t enough to validate Prof. Ismail Shariff’s commitment to a University of Wisconsin-Green Bay education, consider that he also convinced his son, brother-in-law, and four grandchildren to attend UWGB before retiring in 2011.

The economist who continues to advise the World Bank, travels nationally to present on economic issues, and spends a day a week at the emeriti office on campus, said he found an environment of respectful collegiality along with deep meaning in the interdisciplinary, problem-focused academic program during his more than four decades with UW-Green Bay.

“My major professor at UW-Madison asked whether I was interested in a university job and set up an appointment to see (founding Chancellor) Dr. Edward Weidner. Apart from other things, Weidner explained to me the interdisciplinary curriculum he planned on adapting. I didn’t quite understand his philosophy, but he offered me the job and gave me seven days to reply. I came to benefit as a scholar and teacher, as did our students, from an interdisciplinary approach to problem solving.”

Shariff set out on what became his personal mission: “to prepare and equip future generations of citizens to meet challenges in society and the workplace and in a global context.”

“I believe these goals can be accomplished through a well-rounded educational career which provides breadth and depth of knowledge, insights, and understanding; along with the analytical skills and tools to deal with any exigencies one may encounter on the journey of life.”

Shariff believes UWGB provides this kind of education and through the years became a believer in “Weidner’s novel approach, since adopted by many other reputable institutions.”

“I came to enjoy the significance of the interdisciplinary curriculum, and the breadth of problem solving that came about from working with economists, geographers, political scientists, geologists, sociologists, demographers, statisticians, psychologists and others.”

He so fully appreciated the practical value of a UW-Green Bay education that he advised his children, grandchildren and brother-in-law that UW-Green Bay could provide an undergraduate experience “equal to Ivy League or any other bachelor program in the U.S.”

His family trusts in his wisdom. His son Mazkoor ‘89 graduated with a degree in Business Administration. His brother-in-law Javeed graduated in ‘80 with a degree in Environmental Sciences. His granddaughter Julia will graduate in May of 2015 with a Human Biology degree and honors, and aspiration to attend medical school. Of his three grandsons, Alexander will graduate in May 2015 with a major in Graphic Arts; Zachary is a junior majoring in Political Science and Jacob will enter UWGB as a sophomore in fall of 2015.

Shariff has more than 80 published papers in professional journals in the United States, U.K. and Asia. He is the author of two books, International Trade – Theory and Policy; and Business Cycles in a Dynamic Recovery. In his works and presentation in Italy in 2002, the editor and founder of the Schumpeter Lectures Series, V. Orati, wrote about the “brilliant and fearless” contribution of Dr. Shariff to the discussion about globalization.

Among his proudest moments were the peer-nominated Founders Awards for Excellence in Scholarship in 2002 and Community Outreach in 1997. An occasional e-mail from former students, and thank-you cards from recipients of the Ismail Shariff Endowed Scholarship he established in 2009 are greatly appreciated, he says.

“Something that is more rewarding than any other benefits one can draw, is contributing to the future well-being of our citizens,” he said. “I always hoped to keep their interest at heart.”

Among the honors for Shariff over the years:

• 1997 University Award for Excellence in Community Outreach. Notable were a weekly column in the Green Bay Press-Gazette, and involvement in the Chamber of Commerce, Junior Achievement and SIFE.

• Carrying the ceremonial University Mace at commencement and other academic occasions, an honor accorded the senior-most faculty member. Shariff carried it from 2005 to 2012.

• On March 24, 1994 his name was entered in the Congressional Record from the floor of the U.S. Congress in recognition of his extensive research on the relevance of American Aid to Developing Countries.

• In 1999, he was awarded a prestigious named professorship at UW-Green Bay and bestowed the title Philip J. and Elizabeth Hendrickson Professor for Business.

• In 1991, he was selected to represent the U.S. Department of Agriculture at the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trades (GATT) meetings in Tokyo.

• In 1979, he was voted one of the “enterprising people” in Economic Education by the Wisconsin State Council on Economic Education.

• From 1975-77 he was a United Nations economic adviser to the government of Nigeria.

Photo caption:
From left: grandsons Zachary and Alexander, Ismail Shariff, grandson Jacob, granddaughter Julia and son Mazkor. Missing from the UWGB/Shariff family — brother-in-law Hajee Masood Javeed

Power of partnership: Phoenix Athletics, Prevea make a winning team

top-story-partnershipJeremy Cleven (above) head athletics trainer for the Phoenix, is far from alone in his work despite being the only sports medicine professional formally employed by UW-Green Bay.

Take, for example, his colleague Callie Bartel, who has long been steeped in the culture and camaraderie of Phoenix Athletics at UW-Green Bay.

She’s an alumna who ran cross country with the Phoenix before graduating with a degree in Human Biology in 2009. Each day, she reports to her on-campus office and then sets about her day as an athletic trainer, working with student-athletes who want to stay at — or return to — the top of their game.

But Bartel isn’t a University employee. Rather, she’s part of an innovative partnership with Prevea Sports Medicine, a program that provides athletic trainers who are contracted out to UW-Green Bay.

“I knew I wanted to work at the college level right away,” Bartel said. “I wanted those athletes — they were there for a reason, and if they got hurt, they were going to do whatever it takes to get better.”

The partnership allows Bartel and her fellow athletic trainers — Prevea provides two others, plus two strength coaches — to work full-time with Cleven, who is employed by UW-Green Bay. It also provides Phoenix athletes with quick access to Prevea physicians as they need it, offering another big-time benefit for Division I athletes who just want to play — and play healthy.

“The community relationships are something that have really been important to them, and they have a passion for sports medicine,” Cleven said. “It’s kind of in their blood to take care of the local college athletes.”

Prevea is pleased to partner with a great University and the only Division I school in Northeastern Wisconsin, said Michael LaMere, Prevea’s Sports Medicine Outreach Supervisor. Its athletic trainers attend continuing education courses year-round to stay abreast of current trends, and the athletic training team meets frequently to review emergency and rehabilitation protocols to make sure athletes receive the highest level of care possible.

“The athletic trainers are the first line of defense of making sure the athlete is taken care of in a safe and timely manner,” LaMere said. “From a minor injury to a life-threatening injury, the athletic trainers are equipped to manage every situation that is thrown their way. With an athletic trainer on the sidelines, it helps give the student-athletes and coaches the peace of mind that they have someone right there with knowledge and skill to take care of injuries that may happen.”

UW-Green Bay’s longstanding relationship with Prevea is reflected not only on the sidelines of games and practices, but also in the very name of its training room — the Hinckley Sports Medicine Center on the lower level of the Kress Events Center on campus. The room is named after Prevea orthopedic surgeon, longtime team physician and UW-Green Bay philanthropist Dr. James Hinckley, who with his late wife Patricia received UW-Green Bay’s highest community honor, the Chancellor’s Award, in 2012.

The partnership also played a significant role in Bartel’s transition from student-athlete to athletic trainer. While a Phoenix cross country runner, Bartel established relationships with Cleven and then-UW-Green Bay athletic trainer Emily (Meeuwsen) Johnson, daughter of current UW-Green Bay Trustee Kate Meeuwsen ’76. The pair mentored Bartel and helped her land an internship with Prevea and UW-Green Bay between her first and second year of graduate school. It’s yet another example of how a longstanding partnership has paid off — for everyone involved.

“Callie’s experience has really brought a unique outlook to our sports medicine staff,” LaMere said. “Being a UWGB athlete, she came into the position with more knowledge of the University, the Athletic Department and Prevea than most would. Knowing the ins and outs really helped her hit the ground running quickly.

“Callie has always known she wanted to work with athletes, and it is great that she can continue what she started at UWGB.”