Prof. Luczaj talks with Wisconsin Public Radio about the new Water Science program

“As the world continues to deal with an increasing amount of water quality and quantity issues, there’s a growing demand for workers with a water science background. We hear about one Wisconsin university’s new effort to try and meet that demand.” Listen to host Kate Archer Kent and guest UW-Green Bay Prof. John Luczaj, as they discuss UW-Green Bay’s news Water Science degree.

Visiting astronomy professor to give three talks this week

Albion College’s Prof. Nicolle Zellner, one of the American Astronomical Society’s Shapley Lecturers, will give three astronomy and geology talks in Green Bay next week:

  • “50 Years Since Apollo: What We Learned About the Moon and Why We Should Go Back,” Neville Public Museum Astronomical Society meeting, Wednesday, Mar. 6, 2019 at 6:30 p.m. in Room 122/123. Free and open to the public.
  • “Space Rocks: To the Moon – and Beyond!”, UW-Green Bay Geology Club Meeting, Thursday, Mar. 7, 2019 at 6:30 p.m. in UW-Green Bay’s Mary Ann Cofrin (MAC) Hall, Room 208. Free and open to the public.
  • Natural & Applied Sciences Seminar, “Impacts in the Earth-Moon System: What, When and Why Should We Care?”, Friday, Mar. 8, 2019 at 3:10 p.m. in UW-Green Bay’s Environmental Sciences (ES) building, Room 30. Free and open to the public.

Faculty note: Luczaj, Houghton and Shea receive grant for bedrock mapping

Professor John Luczaj (Geoscience), research scientist Chris Houghton, and graduate student Abby Shea will be working on constructing a depth to bedrock map for the county, along with an analysis of the groundwater chemistry in a deeper sandstone aquifer accessible in the northwestern portion of the county. The researchers received a grant for $34,580 from the Wisconsin DNR for the project entitled A Depth-to-Bedrock Map and Deep Aquifer Characterization for Kewaunee County, WI.

Geology Club President leads Baird Creek walk, Saturday, Nov. 18

On Saturday, Nov. 18 at 1 p.m., join UW-Green Bay graduate student and Geology Club President, Zachary Ashauer, at Christa McAuliffe Park (3100 Sitka St.) to learn about glacial formations and the landscape of the past on the Geology Hike through the Baird Creek Greenway. Remember to dress for the weather, and be prepared to encounter a few hills and unpaved trails. For parties of six or more, please call Holly at 920.328.3505.

Faculty note: Prof. Luczaj is coauthor

UW-Green Bay Prof. John Luczaj (Geology, Geoscience) is one of several coauthors of the invited review article “Paleozoic reactivation structures in the Appalachian-Ouachita-Marathon foreland: Far-field deformation across Pangea,” which appears in the June 2017 issue of Earth-Science Reviews, published by Elsevier. The article describes how fold and fault structures in the middle of the continent were influenced by Appalachian Mountain building events on the east coast during formation of the supercontinent Pangea. Full access can be obtained here.

WFRV previews “The Great Ledge” featuring Prof. Luczaj

It’s a documentary that takes viewers across Northeast Wisconsin to the Niagara Escarpment. It is a ridge of rock millions of years old — reaching from east-central Wisconsin all the way to Upstate New York. UW-Green Bay Prof. John Luczaj (Geology) is one of many experts in the film telling the story of the natural rock ledge — filled with caves, waterfalls and rocks slopes formed over time, carved through erosian by rivers and glaciers, “People should know the aspects of the geology and biology that are relative to their region,” said Luczaj. “The Great Ledge” premieres Wednesday, April 26 at 6:30 p.m. at the De Pere Cinema. Tickets for the event, a fundraiser for that school curriculum project, are $10. WFRV-TV previewed the documentary.

Faculty note: Prof. Luczaj publication

UW-Green Bay Prof. John Luczaj (Geology, Natural & Applied Sciences) is a co-author of a recent peer-reviewed work. “Groundwater Management Area, Wisconsin, USA: A Century of Groundwater Use,” published in the journal Geosciences in March 2017.  The article is culmination of 10 years of researching the water levels in the deep sandstone aquifer beneath Green Bay and the Fox Cities.