Tag: Center for History and Social Change

30th anniversary of the Historical Perspectives Lecture Series

Prof. Harvey J. Kaye of the Center for History and Social Change advises campus and community to mark their calendars for two big events this fall marking both 50 years of UW-Green Bay and 30 years of the Historical Perspectives Lecture Series:

• Oct. 6, 7 p.m., Christie Theatre
 – Richard Brookhiser, senior editor of the National Review, a prominent conservative and author of biographies of Washington, Hamilton and others, will speak on “Lincoln and the Founders”

• Nov. 3, 2 p.m., Christie Theatre
 – Margaret Somers, professor of sociology and history, University of Michigan, on 20th century political economist and “economic democracy” advocate Karl Polanyi

Socialism gets a bad rap, guest speaker Nichols will argue


Nationally known political writer John Nichols will address the topic “Socialism in America” in the next installment of UW-Green Bay’s long-running Historical Perspectives Lecture Series. Nichols’ talk, free and open to the public, takes place at 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 24, in the Christie Theatre of the University Union. Nichols has worked as associate editor of The Capital Times in Madison since 1993 and is a contributing writer for The Progressive and The Nation magazines. In his UW-Green Bay talk, it is expected Nichols will discuss themes presented in his 2011 book The ‘S’ Word: A Short History of An American Tradition… Socialism. In it, he argues that while the words “socialist” and “socialism” have become widely used as smear terms in American politics, the actual application of socialist principles can be found in successful programs including Social Security and the “sewer socialism” that stressed public works projects and the common good in U.S. cities including Milwaukee. For details.

Author Nichols to address ‘Socialism in America’

Nationally known political writer and journalist John Nichols will address the topic “Socialism in America” as the next installment in UW-Green Bay’s long-running Historical Perspectives Lecture Series.

Nichols’ talk, free and open to the public, takes place at 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 24 in the Christie Theatre of the UW-Green Bay University Union.

Nichols has worked as associate editor of The Capital Times newspaper in Madison since 1993 and is a contributing writer for The Progressive and The Nation magazines. He is regarded as one of Wisconsin’s best-known progressive political voices. The late author Gore Vidal once said of him, “Of all the giant slayers now afoot in the great American desert, John Nichols’ sword is the sharpest.”

Nichols’ work has appeared in The New York Times and Chicago Tribune, among others. He has appeared on “Bill Moyers Now” and has been a regular contributor to MSNBC with appearance on the Ed Schulz and Chris Hayes commentary shows.

In his March 24 talk at UW-Green Bay, it is expected Nichols will discuss themes presented in his 2011 book The ‘S’ Word: A Short History of An American Tradition… Socialism. In it, he argued that while the words “socialist” and “socialism” have become widely used as smear terms in American politics, the actual application of socialist principles is rather widely accepted. Many of its concepts, Nichols writes, remain alive and well in programs including Social Security and the “sewer socialism” that stressed public works projects and the common good in U.S. cities including Milwaukee.

Nichols’ most recent book, Dollarocracy: How the Money and Media Election Complex is Destroying America, co-authored with media critic Robert W. McChesney, examines what they view as the way big money and special interests are challenging the DNA of American democracy. Nichols also is the author of Uprising: How Wisconsin Renewed the Politics of Protest, from Madison to Wall Street.

The lecture series is the foremost activity of the Center for History and Social Change. First organized in 1985, the series brings in a wide variety of historians and social scientists who speak on relevant issues. It is made possible thanks to funds from the University, the Democracy and Justice Studies Student Organization, the UW-Green Bay University League and the UW-Green Bay Founders Association. Supporters hope to create an endowment for continued support of the lecture series.

The Center for History and Social Change promotes historical thought, study and discourse at UW-Green Bay and in the larger community through lectures, seminars and other campus events. It is associated most directly with the University’s academic program in Democracy and Justice Studies, and pursues its activities in relation to that program’s goals. It also works closely with other academic programs to reinforce and support UW-Green Bay’s interdisciplinary mission.

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Performance, literary talk highlight fall offerings for Historical Perspectives series

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s long-running Historical Perspectives Lecture Series will feature live performance and academic discussion during fall 2014, continuing a tradition that dates back nearly 30 years.

The series will kick off Wednesday, Oct. 8, when dramatist and actor Ian Ruskin performs To Begin the World Over Again: The Life of Thomas Paine. Trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, Ruskin has acted in film and television and on stage, and is currently performing his self-written Thomas Paine play across the country. The event will begin at 2:15 p.m. in the Christie Theatre of the University Union on campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

The second Historical Perspectives event of the fall semester will feature UW-Madison History Prof. William J. Reese speaking on his recent book, “Testing Wars in the Public Schools: A Forgotten History.” The book considers the controversy around written tests when they initially were adopted in the 1800s, tracing the exams’ history and political implications through the generations. Reese will take the stage at 2:15 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 23, also in the Christie Theatre.

First organized in 1985, the Historical Perspectives Lecture Series brings in a wide variety of historians and social scientists who speak on relevant issues. It is made possible thanks to funds from the University, the Democracy and Justice Studies Student Organization, the UW-Green Bay University League and the UW-Green Bay Founders Association. Supporters hope to create an endowment for continued support of the lecture series.

The Center for History and Social Change promotes historical thought, study and discourse at UW-Green Bay and in the larger community through lectures, seminars and other campus events. It is associated most directly with the University’s academic program in Democracy and Justice Studies, and pursues its activities in relation to that program’s goals. It also works closely with other academic programs to reinforce and support UW-Green Bay’s interdisciplinary mission.

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Historical Perspectives lecture to focus on global aid, humanitarianism

The Center for History and Social Change is gearing up for the next installment in its long-running Historical Perspectives Lecture Series, set for 2 p.m. Thursday, April 24 in the Union’s Christie Theatre. Julia Irwin, an assistant professor at the University of South Florida, will present “Foreign Relief as Foreign Relations,” a lecture that focuses on her new book, “Making the World Safe: The American Red Cross and a Nation’s Humanitarian Awakening.” The book examines the history of the Red Cross from its 1881 founding, and also shows that with the organization’s evolution, Americans began to see foreign aid as a critical element in global relations. The event is free and open to the public. More details.

Historical Perspectives lecture to focus on foreign aid, relations in history

An assistant professor from the University of South Florida will present “Foreign Relief as Foreign Relations: The place of Humanitarianism in U.S. International History,” at 2 p.m. Thursday, April 24 in the Christie Theatre of the UW-Green Bay University Union.

Julia Irwin’s talk is the latest installment in UW-Green Bay’s long-running Historical Perspectives Lecture Series, the foremost activity of the Center for History and Social Change at the University. Irwin’s lecture will focus on her new book, “Making the World Safe: The American Red Cross and a Nation’s Humanitarian Awakening.” The book examines the history of the Red Cross from its 1881 founding, and also shows that with the organization’s evolution, Americans began to see foreign aid as a critical element in global relations. More information about Irwin’s book is available on Amazon.

First organized in 1985, the Historical Perspectives Lecture Series brings in a wide variety of historians and social scientists who speak on relevant issues. It is made possible thanks to funds from the University, the Democracy and Justice Studies Student Organization, the UW-Green Bay University League and the UW-Green Bay Founders Association. Supporters hope to create an endowment for continued support of the lecture series.

The Center for History and Social Change promotes historical thought, study and discourse at UW-Green Bay and in the larger community through lectures, seminars and other campus events. It is associated most directly with the University’s academic program in Democracy and Justice Studies, and pursues its activities in relation to that program’s goals. It also works closely with other academic programs to reinforce and support UW-Green Bay’s interdisciplinary mission.

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Labor journalist Pizzigati to headline next Historical Perspectives Lecture event

The long-running Historical Perspectives Lecture Series at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay will feature a veteran labor journalist and Institute For Policy Studies associate fellow during its next event at 3:45 p.m. Wednesday, April 16 in the Christie Theatre of the University Union on campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive. It is free and open to the public.

The Rich Don’t Always Win: The Forgotten Triumph Over Plutocracy That Created the Middle Class, 1900-1970Sam Pizzigati will speak about his recent book, “The Rich Don’t Always Win: The Forgotten Triumph Over Plutocracy That Created the Middle Class, 1900-1970.” Pizzigati’s book takes issue with the widely accepted notion that protests against wealth inequality in the U.S. will have little effect, and that ultimately the rich “always get their way.” He argues that the super-rich of a century ago were even more domineering than the super-rich of today, and that the transformation to a more middle-class nation should be inspiring but remains largely unknown. More information about Pizzigati’s book, including an excerpt, is available on the website of its publisher, Seven Stories Press.

The Historical Perspectives Lecture Series, first organized in 1985, is the foremost activity of the Center for History and Social Change at UW-Green Bay. The annual series of talks by a wide variety of historians and social scientists is made possible thanks to funds from the University, the Democracy and Justice Studies Student Organization, the UW-Green Bay University League and the UW-Green Bay Founders Association. Supporters hope to create an endowment for continued support of the lecture series.

The Center for History and Social Change promotes historical thought, study and discourse at UW-Green Bay and in the larger community through lectures, seminars and other campus events. It is associated most directly with the University’s academic program in Democracy and Justice Studies, and pursues its activities in relation to that program’s goals. It also works closely with other academic programs to reinforce and support UW-Green Bay’s interdisciplinary mission.

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Reminder: Civil Rights Movement lecture is Wednesday

The “forgotten history” of the Civil Rights Movement and the landmark 1963 March on Washington will be the topic at 2:15 p.m. Wednesday (Nov. 6) in the Union’s Christie Theatre as part of the long-running Historical Perspectives Lecture Series. Will Jones, an author and professor of history at UW-Madison, is the guest speaker. Read more details.
 

‘Forgotten history’ of 1963 March on Washington is lecture topic

Prof. Will Jones

Prof. Will Jones

The “forgotten history” of the Civil Rights Movement and the landmark 1963 March on Washington will be the topic at UW-Green Bay Wednesday, Nov. 6, in the next installment of the long-running Historical Perspectives Lecture Series.

Will Jones, an author and professor of history at UW-Madison, will speak at 2:15 p.m. in the Christie Theatre on the lower level of the University Union, located on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Drive. Admission is free and open to the general public.

Jones will talk about his research and new book, The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights, published earlier this year by W.W. Norton & Company publishers.

Jones argues that the significance of the March on Washington rests only in part on Martin Luther King’s dazzling “I Have a Dream” speech. He notes that opening keynote on Aug. 28, 1963, actually came from the famous trade union leader A. Philip Randolph, who had first called for a march on Washington at the outset of World War II to press for equal opportunity in employment and the armed forces. Randolph advocated not only an end to segregation but also a living wage for every American. The vision of economic and social justice articulated by Randolph remains an overlooked aspect of the Civil Rights Movement, Jones believes.

Jones has been a member of the UW-Madison faculty since 2005. He is a historian of the 20th century United States, with a particular interest in race, class and work. He has written books on African American industrial workers in the Jim Crow South and the Civil Rights Movement. He has contributed essays and articles to The Nation and other publications, has been a frequent guest on Wisconsin Public Radio, and has been quoted in The New York Times, Christian Science Monitor and an extensive list of national and state media outlets.

The Historical Perspectives Lecture Series, first organized in 1985, is the foremost activity of the Center for History and Social Change at UW-Green Bay. The annual series of talks by a wide variety of historians and social scientists is made possible thanks to funds from the University, the Democracy and Justice Studies Student Organization, the UW-Green Bay University League and the UW-Green Bay Founders Association.

The Center for History and Social Change promotes historical thought, study and discourse at UW-Green Bay and in the larger community through lectures, seminars and other campus events. It is associated most directly with the University’s academic program in Democracy and Justice Studies, and pursues its activities in relation to that program’s goals. It also works closely with other academic programs to reinforce and support UW-Green Bay’s interdisciplinary mission.

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UW-Green Bay hosts lecture by Yale scholar on memory, identity in Black America

A Yale University scholar will visit UW-Green Bay Monday, Oct. 21, to speak on the topic of his new book, Jim Crow Wisdom: Memory and Identity in Black America Since 1940, as part of the long-running Historical Perspectives Lecture Series.

Jonathan Scott Holloway is a professor of history, African American studies, and American studies at Yale University. He will speak at 2:15 p.m. in the Christie Theatre on the lower level of the University Union, located on the campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive. Admission is free and open to the general public.

Holloway’s book was released in mid-October by UNC Press. In it, he explores race memory from the dawn of the modern civil rights era to the present, weaving first-person and family memories — including discoveries about his own past — into a traditional, objective historian’s perspective.

The book poses the question: How does Black America balance the desire for tales of exceptional accomplishment with the need for painful doses of reality? How hard does a society work to remember its past or to forget it? Relying on social science, documentary film, dance, popular literature, museums, memoir, and the tourism trade, Holloway explores the stories black Americans have told about their past and why these stories are vital to understanding a modern black identity.

Holloway is also the author of Confronting the Veil (2002), about New Deal-era black scholars who formed the leading edge of American social science radicalism. He edited Ralph Bunche’s A Brief and Tentative Analysis of Negro Leadership (2005) and co-edited the anthology, Black Scholars on the Line: Race, Social Science, and American Thought in the 20th Century (2007).

Holloway’s address will be the first of fall semester 2013 for the Historical Perspectives Lecture Series. The second, on Nov. 6, will feature Will Jones, associate professor of history at UW-Madison, discussing his new book on civil rights and The March on Washington.

The Historical Perspectives Lecture Series, first organized in 1985, is the foremost activity of the Center for History and Social Change at UW-Green Bay. The annual series of talks by a wide variety of historians and social scientists is made possible thanks to funds from the University, the Democracy and Justice Studies Student Organization, the UW-Green Bay University League and the UW-Green Bay Founders Association.

The Center for History and Social Change promotes historical thought, study and discourse at UW-Green Bay and in the larger community through lectures, seminars and other campus events. It is associated most directly with the University’s academic program in Democracy and Justice Studies, and pursues its activities in relation to that program’s goals. It also works closely with other academic programs to reinforce and support UW-Green Bay’s interdisciplinary mission.

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