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After Thoughts speaker Herdman hits on all cylinders with holism and healthcare talk

UW-Green Bay’s After Thoughts is meant for learning, enrichment and fun. Tuesday evening’s speaker Associate Professor of Nursing Heather Herdman hit on all cylinders.

In front of a full house in the Grand Foyer of the Weidner Center, Herdman managed to educate and inspire while giving the audience a new understanding of the history of holism in healthcare, and why our region and our country have a long way to go.

“Holism, health and healing are inextricably linked,” she said. That doesn’t mean that one patient can rely on just one method of treatment or prevention. “After all, when there is a tragic accident, we really do want the trauma surgeon.”

“I am a nurse, and I cannot do a presentation without mentioning Florence Nightingale,” joked Herdman. “Nightingale was the first person who focused on unity and wellness and the interrelationships of human beings to events and environment. She also was the first to use statistics to prove her theories and show the outcomes — that people really do get better care with fresh air, light and quiet, for example.” Another first for Nightingale was her recognition of post-traumatic stress disorder in soldiers and the need to treat more than the physical injury.

Herdman encouraged the need to pursue integrative healthcare — essentially treating the mind, body and spirit at the same time — treating patients as more than the sum of their illnesses. Switching the model from a reductionist model where treatment is given for a symptom to a more holistic model, where prevention and treating the whole person — his or her environment, genetic history, events, situations, life stages — could wipe out some of the top most treatable and debilitating illnesses (diabetes, obesity, heart failure, asthma, for example) to the savings of billions of dollars in healthcare costs.

“Our system doesn’t pay for prevention. It needs to start focusing on paying for prevention and health promotion,” Herdman says. “And evidence-based healthcare should be the only acceptable standard.” As an example, she said that studies showed technology doesn’t always determine consistently better results. A robotics surgery may be no more effective than a surgery performed through traditional methods, but the costs of the new technology is pressuring the healthcare system to the point of financial disaster. “We can’t continue to do what we have been doing.”

Herdman said some hospitals and research centers (Mayo and the University of Minnesota, for instance) are beginning to look at holistic opportunities because solubility of the nation’s healthcare system is going to demand it. Other countries — England and Germany, for instance — have years of documented success with holistic healing.

“We need to pay for prevention, and the healthcare providers that can guide it,” said Herdman. “We need to move to evidence-based healthcare being the only acceptable standard, and we need large demonstration projects – possibly funded by philanthropists or healthcare providers that see this as the sustainable direction.”

“Integrative healthcare puts the patient at the center, focuses on prevention and is preventive, predictive and personalized,” she said.

Herdman has held leadership positions with national and international nursing organizations. She is widely recognized for her expertise in holistic care and has studied clinical aromatherapy, massage and herbal therapies.

Now in its fifth full season, After Thoughts seeks to connect members of the community with UW-Green Bay. The gatherings showcase talented women among University faculty, staff and alumni, and convene men and women after their workday for learning, enrichment and fun.

The next After Thoughts presentation will be by Professors Alison Gates (fiber arts) and Heidi Sherman (history) regarding their collaborative Flax Project — a multi-year interdisciplinary study that recreates the ancient processing of flax to linen, from seed to cloth to paper. Find out more about their upcoming presentation on the After Thoughts website.

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Cofrin Center for Biodiversity shares in $10 million Great Lakes grant

Biologist Bob Howe, professor of Natural and Applied Sciences and director of the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity, and Erin Giese, the Center’s data manager, are UW-Green Bay’s participants in a newly announced, multi-state, multi-university grant of $10 million to monitor coastal wetlands around the Great Lakes Basin over the next five years. This project expands an existing grant that has involved Howe, Giese and more than 20 UW-Green Bay undergraduate and graduate students since 2010. Coordinated by researchers at Central Michigan University, the project allocates $222,000 to support field activities and data analysis by UW-Green Bay staff and students. The basin-wide coastal wetland monitoring program evaluates ongoing and future wetland restoration efforts, as well as fish, invertebrates, birds, amphibians, plant communities, and chemical and physical variables at the majority of coastal wetland areas throughout the Great Lakes basin. Results will be used to prevent further wetland degradation and to set priorities for future wetland protection. Along with Central Michigan and UW-Green Bay, the initiative includes collaborators from the University of Minnesota-Duluth, UW-River Falls, Lake Superior State University, University of Notre Dame, Grand Valley State University, University of Windsor, State University of New York at Brockport, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, U.S. Geological Survey, Environment Canada, and Bird Studies Canada.

Fall 2015 Job Fair was major success 

Career Services coordinated and hosted a record number of employers (86, with an overflow room and a lengthy waiting list) for its annual Fall Job and Internship Fair last Wednesday in the University Union. Nearly 400 students attended — a 20 percent-plus increase from the spring event. Immediate feedback from employers was overwhelmingly positive, according to Director Linda Peacock-Landrum. “Students were dressed professionally and came prepared to talk with employers, showing both planning and organization skills, with resumes and great questions,” she said. “Numerous organizations left the event with solid candidate leads. The days following the job fair have resulted in over 90 interviews occurring on campus with more to come in the month of October.”

Hutchison invited to help organize 2016 European Sociological conference

Prof. Ray Hutchison of Sociology has been tagged to serve on the Scientific Committee for the next mid-term conference of the RN-37 research network of the European Sociological Association. “Moving cities: Contested views on urban life” will be held June 29-July 1, 2016 at the Jagiellonian University, in Krakow. (That’s the old city of Krakow, Poland, not the more recently settled Krakow, Wis., which is north of Pulaski on Highway 32.) Jagiellonian University is the oldest institution of higher education in Eastern Europe, founded by Casimir the Great in 1364. Hutchison notes that sociology conferences in Europe are much different from those in the United States, drawing scholars from many different countries with vastly different research traditions, much more informed by social theory, and much more interdisciplinary than what one would find here.

Katers, Holzem contribute articles on waste management to dairy publication

Natural and Applied Sciences Profs. John Katers (of EMBI) and Ryan M. Holzem (of the new Environmental Engineering Technology program) recently wrapped up a three-article series for the Progressive Dairyman magazine. Karen Lee, the editor, asked Katers and Holzem to address considerations for using digesters on large dairy farms. The Progressive Dairyman print and online editions reach more than 25,000 large-herd, forward-thinking producers throughout the United States. The articles are summarized below:

* “Considerations for sizing an anaerobic digester,” published online on April 28, 2015, described the need to properly quantify and characterize the manure and water sources that would end up in the digester, and use the appropriate hydraulic and solids retention times to obtain optimal digestion.
* “Four reasons why anaerobic digesters fail,” published online on June 29, examined issues of poor design and equipment selection, lack of technical expertise, maintenance, and inadequate follow-through.
* “Co-digestion considerations for anaerobic digestion systems,” published online Sept. 30, was created as a tear sheet (found at the link). The article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using off-farm substrates (i.e., distillery waste, dairy waste, food waste, energy crops, and fats oils and greases) in a farms anaerobic digester. The article ends with several important questions that farmers should ask themselves prior to initiating co-digestion with their digester.

Forbes ’30 under 30’ honoree speaks Thursday on innovation

Here’s a final reminder that visiting Common Theme speaker Brian Bordainick will make a free public presentation on campus at 7 p.m. Thursday (Oct. 8) in the Phoenix Room of the University Union. The young entrepreneur learned how to involve local communities and solicit financial support during his Teach for America placement in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, where he won support for not only rebuilding but making better learning environments for the city’s youth. Since then, Bordainick has won Forbes “30 under 30” recognition as creator and CEO of an innovative restaurant-industry venture called Dinner Lab. In select cities, chefs from local restaurants create a specific, creative menu for a specific off-site setting (never in the same place twice), inviting adventurous patrons to try new creations and enjoy the experience with fellow diners they’ve not met before, and then to provide feedback for the next Dinner Lab.

UW-Green Bay presents Wilder’s ‘Theophilus North’ as first play

We’ll have a link to full details in our Log Extra later this week, but we’re one week out from the UW-Green Bay Theatre and Dance program’s production of the charming comedy-drama Theophilus North, which opens at 7:30 p.m. next Thursday (Oct. 15) in the Jean Weidner Theatre. Performances are Oct. 15-17 and 21-24. Set in 1926 during the height of the Jazz Age, the play follows the character Theophilus North as he quits his teaching position in New Jersey and embarks on a quest for fun, adventure and a place in the world. When his broken-down car strands him in Newport, Rhode Island, he makes do by doing odd jobs in homes of the wealthy. It’s a Matthew Burnett play based upon the semi-autobiographical final work of Pulitzer Prize-winner Thornton Wilder. For ticket info.

Also next Thursday: Rector-Hong piano duo

Again, full detail in our upcoming issue, but next Thursday (Oct. 15) marks the return of the UW-Green Bay Music Program’s ‘6:30 Thursdays’ program. The two-piano duo/husband and wife team of Sylvia Hong and Michael Rector (of the faculty), winners of the Ellis Duo Piano Competition, will offer an attractive program illuminating the power of harmony and repetition to create intense musical effects.

‘Phlash Talks’ (part of Alumni Days) include reflections by standout grads

There’s a long list of Alumni Days events (again, more on that later), but here’s one we want to call special attention to, in advance: “Phlash Talks,” set for 2 to 3 p.m. next Friday, Oct. 16, in the Union’s Christie Theatre. Four award-winning alumni are returning to campus to offer their own short “Phlash Talk” (sort of in the spirit of a TED Talk) on how UWGB influenced their careers. The audience will be invited to interact with the guests over the course of the hour. The invited alumni presenters:
• Dr. Jack Potts, 1971, Humanism and Cultural Change
• Kelly Ruh, 2001, Accounting and Business Administration
• Andy Rosendahl, 2007, Public Administration
• Patrick Madden, 1971, Modernization Processes