Category: Leading & Learning

Star faculty, academic programs, students, campus leaders, student leaders, community leaders, special achievements

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From struggle to stand-out: Canzoneri finds success at UW-Green Bay

In a few days communication student William Canzoneri will take his last class at UW-Green Bay and his transformation from undecided major to confident and experienced graduate will be complete. Watch out world.

His happy ending is not something Canzoneri would have pictured while in high school.
“I wasn’t the most diligent student in high school, despite making varsity on both football and wrestling. I think I finished somewhere under a 3.0.”

His college career began inauspiciously. He dropped out of technical college, re-enrolled and then prepared to transfer. Two factors influenced his transfer location: a $25 career assessment test and a visit to a friend at UW-Green Bay.

“The career assessment gave me three top choices: writer, public relations, and FBI agent,” he said, “Not wanting to be a starving artist despite how much I enjoyed writing, and the fact that being an FBI agent sounded intimidating, I chose public relations.”

As for what school to attend, the visit to a friend solidified Canzoneri’s decision to attend UW-Green Bay.

“I fell in love with it,” he said, “The beautiful trails, the nature, the openness. So different from the city.”

After transferring to UW-Green Bay, Canzoneri jumped at the chance to gain even more experience by joining the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA). After serving on the fundraising committee, Canzoneri was elected as Treasurer of the organization for the 2014-2015 academic year.

“The PRSSA has allowed me the chance to work on real PR plans, network with incredible professionals and fellow students around the country, and make great friends.”

Among other opportunities, Canzoneri was invited to join Phi Kappa Phi, the nation’s oldest and most selective honor society for all academic disciplines; he completed an editorial assistant internship; and he and his UWGB classmates were part of the team that won the Edelman Case Study Competition in Chicago, in Spring 2015, competing against college teams from across the nation. Most recently, he was chosen as a finalist for “Talking the Talk,” a competition hosted by Time Warner Sports. See his audition here.

“All of these successes have both challenged me, matured me, and made me more confident,” he said.

When looking to the future, Canzoneri is focused on constant improvement.

“I always tell myself: You need to do better Bill,” he said, “That shapes my thought process. I want to do more, work harder, make better habits.”

This change, from struggling student to stand out success, is something that Canzoneri is thankful his UWGB education provided him.

“From sundown at Lambeau Cottage to getting happily lost somewhere in the Cofrin Arboretum, I salute you UW-Green Bay,” he said, “You’re outstanding, incredible, fantastic. Thanks for everything.”

Story by 2015 UWGB graduate Katelyn Staaben

UW-Green Bay International Education and Study Abroad have banner years

top-story-internationalThey are UW-Green Bay’s ambassadors to the far reaches of the world. A record 229 UWGB students traveled to 30 locations outside the United States in 2014-15. The most popular destinations — Cuernavaca, Mexico, Spain, Italy and South Africa. And 2015-16 enrollment numbers are just as promising.

UWGB’s Office of International Education (OIE) also helped International students navigate life in the United States, the unpredictable weather of Green Bay, and the culture shock of a foreign land. Those students came from 30 countries with nearly 25 percent of them from China, followed by Brazil, Germany, France, Japan and Canada.

Without the OIE, students who often are still learning English as a Second Language (ESL) would be incredibly challenged by instances sometimes even challenging for US residents — airport pick-up and academics, orientation, immigration, programming, financial and health insurance, taxes, driver’s licenses and more.

OIE professionals expect an equally busy year, having already enrolled about 45 new students, with applications still being accepted for 2015-16. New international students are picked up from Green Bay’s Austin Straubel airport on August 24 and 25 and orientation begins almost immediately.

“The students are exposed to community culture with a four-day orientation program designed around local events (Art Street, Farmers Market, Lambeau Field tour) and a trip to Door County,” OIE Student Coordinator Kristy Aoki says. “They also receive an overview of campus services, academic orientation and placement testing. Some international students arrived over summer and are already participating in a summer Intensive English Program.” The mentoring continues all year long and even after students leave UWGB.

“In some ways, we are always their connection to this country,” says Aoki. “The Office of International Education staff becomes an important point of contact for most incoming international students and outgoing study abroad students. Imagine moving to a new country and relearning a completely new system for just about everything from basic cultural norms and creating new friendships to navigating a new educational system, health care and immigration laws. Both studying abroad and international students are brave and courageous for taking the risk to try something new and truly step outside of their comfort zone.”

OIE staff members are rejuvenated by the impact these experiences make on the students they serve — both those that Study Abroad, and those that make UWGB their home for just a short time. Former International Student Niklas Haemer, native of Germany, was so moved by his experience, that he left this grateful post recently on the UWGB Facebook page:

“Unfortunately everything comes to an end and now it is time to leave something behind which has shaped my life a lot… I will never forget this time of my life…I want to thank the people who made this year unbelievably awesome.”

OIE Director Brent Blahnik says the outcomes for students in “mobility programs,” (both study abroad and international students) enrolled at UWGB — have impact beyond cultural competence.

“Studies show that students who study abroad improve their GPA’s and retain higher academic performance in the semesters following a sojourn abroad. Students report greater independence, self-confidence, and maturity; and they also develop skills needed for employment including an ability to problem solve and work through ambiguity,” Blahnik says. “Students learn how to thrive in diverse environments, improve foreign language skills, and take calculated risks. Further national studies show that students who study abroad have higher job placement rates in the 12 months following graduation (nearly double) and earn approximately $7,000 per year more than their peers who do not study abroad.”

Those who report back on their study abroad experiences often have similar themes: life-changing, priceless, confidence-building, but student Ben Freeman seemed to capture it best — “It’s only when you get away from everything you thought defined you that you truly discover who you really are.”

Undergraduate researchers honored and recognized

research-top-storyThe experience is worth celebrating, but so is the recognition.

A number of UW-Green Bay undergraduates had a fantastic opportunity to participate in graduate-level research this year and were honored among the winners of the outstanding presentation awards at the 14th Annual UW-System Symposium for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity.

Their research and presentation was one of 16 finalists selected from among 400 presentations representing undergraduate research from across the UW System.

Their presentation — “Phoenix GPS: A Wholistic College Transition Approach for Underrepresented Students” — reports on the year-one results of an intensive, year-long enrichment program for first year students at UW-Green Bay. Team members were Hannah Blum, Ashley Grant, Jordan Grapentine, Sarah Londo and Alex Wilson. Serving as their mentor was Denise Bartell, UWGB professor of Human Development.

“These students are a shining example of the value of undergraduate research experience for students from all majors,” said Bartell. “Despite coming into the project with very different levels of prior research experience, all developed graduate-level research and group work skills, had the opportunity to present at a national professional conference, and are currently working with me on a manuscript for publication of this data.”

Like her fellow student researchers, Alex Wilson served as a peer mentor in the program. She said the new challenge helped her to grow in ways unexpected: “I came to the realization that the project had a positive effect on my attitude and academics, and that I now place a greater perspective on empathy.”

“I wasn’t sure what to expect, but after the first semester, I found that I was providing to students what I haven’t always had in my life,” she said. “As a low income, first-generation college student, I understand that there are different barriers for every student. Providing opportunities for first-year students to succeed, despite the barriers, became something that I believe in. The types of experiences that the GPS students are having during their first year acts as an equalizer. Our data shows that many of the opportunities that we provide, such as tutoring, relationship building and service learning will create a learning environment that a student is more likely to want to stay in.”

The Gateways to Phirst Year Success (GPS) program provides historically underrepresented students with an engaging learning community experience, a network of mentors, and opportunities to develop academic agency and connections to campus and community.

GPS students earned significantly higher GPA’s, engaged in high impact experiences at higher rates, and were retained at significantly higher rates than similarly situated students who did not participate in GPS, and these results were strongest for students of color.

Underrepresented students who participate in GPS are 17.6% more likely to be retained at UWGB into year two (92.2% vs. 74.6%) and 13.1% more likely to be retained through the end of the second year (81.3% vs. 68.2%), as compared to underrepresented students who don’t participate in GPS.

Underrepresented (UR) GPS students earn significantly higher GPA’s than other underrepresented students in the first year (3.07 vs. 2.74), are significantly more likely to have declared a major (60.9% vs. 49.0%), and report participating in almost twice the number of high impact experiences during their first year (5.4 vs. 3.0). They are also significantly more likely to utilize campus resources in their first year when they need help, and participate in significantly more co-curricular activities, as compared to other UR students.

The GPS program also eliminates the equity gap for UR students in UWGB’s Human Biology 102 course — GPS students performed as well as represented students in this course.

Researching and quantifying the data was only one step in the process for the student researchers. Presenting their data to larger audiences presented a learning curve as well.

“The first few times we presented, we relied heavily on our peer mentor to paint a picture, but we’ve all gotten really comfortable with the numbers and data collection,” Wilson said. “The statistics demonstrate the successes that we saw during the time spent with students.”

Wilson also found that the lessons she learned translated well to outside the project… even outside the University.

“I talk about this program quite a bit,” she said. “The challenges I experienced as a peer mentor come up regularly in my work environment and I have a better idea how to manage. The knowledge I’ve gained as a research assistant is incredibly valuable. It was unexpected, but the growth I’ve witnessed through involvement has been obvious and important in my everyday life.”

Bartell said the program speaks volumes about the power of students’ commitment to helping others maximize their success in college.

“This group of research students represent a diverse set of majors, from Human Development to Spanish to Human Biology,” says Bartell. “They all chose to participate in the research project in order to continue their service to the University and to the underrepresented first-year students who are served by the GPS Program.”
(Pictured in the photo at the top: From left to right, Jordan Grapentine, Ashley Grant, Hannah Blum, Prof. Denise Bartell, Alex Wilson and Sarah Londo at the National Resource Center’s First-Year Experience Conference in Dallas, February 2015)

Lones, Blake pursue competitive summer research opportunities

lorenzo-top-storyWhile some students will spend summer in relaxation mode, UW-Green Bay’s Lorenzo Lones will be working in a lab at one of the top research programs in the nation.

Likewise, UW-Green Bay junior Tresavoya Blake, a History and Democracy and Justice Studies major, will be interning at Loyola University Chicago in its Multicultural Affairs Division this summer as part of a National Undergraduate Fellowship Program.

Each are mentored and encouraged by Justin Mallett, the director of UWGB’s American Intercultural Center.

Lones, a double major in Psychology and Human Biology, will be participating in the University of Iowa Summer Research Opportunity Program throughout June and July. The eight-week program is designed to prepare participants for future doctoral studies through involvement in research and other scholarly activities.

While at the University of Iowa, Lones will be working with Dr. Andrew Pieper, MD, Ph.D. and Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology and Radiation Oncology.

“One of the things that interested me is that the professor I will be working has a very diverse lab team,” said Lones, “He has women, Latinos, African-Americans, so it is just a very diverse team. Also, his research is closely aligned with the type of research I want to do in my career.”

Lones will be working with Pieper to study the effects of two chemicals on mice: One that helps create new brain cells in the memory center of the brain and one that helps stop cell death.

“We have a lot of psychiatric medication that deals with symptoms, but his lab is actually looking at what is causing the symptoms and trying to change the course of the disorder in the brain instead of just alleviating symptoms,” Lones said.

This experience will be a first for Lones who says he has never worked directly in a lab such as this before.

“This will be the first time I’m in the lab actually manipulating things,” he said, “As far as animals are concerned too, I’ll be working with the rats. So that will be a pretty nifty hands-on experience for me.”

Entering UWGB, he thought he would someday be a school psychologist. “I took Prof. Dennis Lorenz’s physiological psychology class and started studying the nervous system and then realized I really like understanding how the brain works.”

He followed that with a molecular biology course with Prof. Uwe Pott, and is honing his career path to research.

“What I want to study is not necessarily the act of giving treatment, but looking at what is the course of treatment… instead of of being a doctor, doing medical research that doctors can benefit from.”

Blake-storyFor Tresavoya Blake, the fellowship is an extension of involvement at UW-Green Bay. She laughs as she begins her list… “Women of Color, Black Student Union, the Diversity Taskforce…”

Her involvement provided a strong case for acceptance into the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program through the National Association for Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA), and the benefits associated with it — such as the eight-week fellowship at Loyola.

“I’ll be actually working with the different staff in different departments, working on any projects they might want me to do,” she said, “Basically learning more about the student affairs field and narrowing down which department or division of student affairs I would be most interested in pursuing when I go to graduate school and eventually start my own career in student affairs.”

Both Lones and Blakes said they understand the need for mentoring and appreciate the faculty and staff who support and encourage them.

“After my experiences here at Green Bay, especially in the American Intercultural Center, and seeing how they helped me just stay here and become more comfortable in the university, that’s the kind of impact I want to make on students in general,” Blake said. “In my future, I want to be the person that helps students of color, underrepresented students, and students in general, navigate through college.”

Lones said he is grateful to the faculty and staff that have helped him prepare for this opportunity, including Prof. Kris Vespia, who worked with him over winter break to help prepare his personal statement.

“The multicultural advisors, Crystal, Justin, and Mai, they do a really good job at keeping me on a straight path,” he said, “The faculty here at the school have been tremendous. They’ve been extremely supportive. I don’t know where I’d be without them.”

Story by Katelyn Staaben, editorial intern

Healing habitats: Grant to build comprehensive plan for fish, wildlife

wolf-howe-top-storyMore than a dozen undergraduate and graduate students have a tremendous opportunity to work alongside UW-Green Bay Professors Bob Howe and Amy Wolf on a comprehensive plan to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the region.

Howe, Wolf and UWGB staff, in collaboration with The Nature Conservancy (TNC), are the recipients of a $471,000 Environmental Protection Agency/Department of Natural Resources grant to study fish and wildlife conditions and threats in what is termed the “Lower Green Bay and Fox River Area of Concern” and its immediately contributing watershed.

“This project is important for our region because it will yield one of the most, if not the most, specific plans for improving fish and wildlife habitat in the lower Bay and Fox River,” said Howe.

Howe considers the assessment, and the recommendations vital to the future regional economy and quality of life.

“Although the AOC is clearly degraded, more and more evidence has shown that this is a ‘world class’ site for freshwater fish, colonial and migratory birds, and other wildlife species,” said Howe. “I view Green Bay as comparable to Chesapeake Bay on the East Coast and San Francisco Bay on the West Coast — places where natural resources have experienced degradation, but places where these resources are still very much alive and are vital to the future local economy and quality of life,” he said.

Lower Green Bay and the Fox River below the DePere Dam comprise one of 43 Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOC’s) designated in 1987 by the International Joint Commission of Canada and the United States through the U.S.-Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The ultimate goal of the UWGB/TNC project is to help develop a strategy for improving conditions in the AOC so that it can be removed or “de-listed” from its impaired status.

Loss of fish and wildlife habitat is one of the most significant reasons why the Lower Green Bay and Fox River AOC was designated as an AOC. Documented (WDNR) causes of ecological and economic impairment of the Lower Green Bay and Fox River AOC include:
• habitat destruction and fragmentation due to urban and industrial development and stream channelization;
• dredging and filling of aquatic habitats along the Fox River corridor;
• wetland degradation from human activity and changing water levels;
• disruption of hydrologic connectivity by road construction and other human activities;
• loss of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Duck Creek delta area of the lower Bay because of turbid water and hyper eutrophication;
• destruction of barrier islands in the Cat Island Chain by high water and storms;
• reduction in underwater plants and littoral vegetation by invasive carp;
• silt deposition and re-suspension of sediments in the Lower Bay; and
spread of invasive plant species.

Alongside UWGB staff members Erin Giese, Michael Stiefvater, Kimberlee McKeefry, and Bobbie Webster, Howe and Wolf are working with students on this two-year, two-phase project to comprehensively assess existing habitat conditions and formulate a protection and restoration plan in the affected areas.

In each phase, UW-Green Bay students will be able to assist the faculty and staff members and Wisconsin DNR and TNC collaborators in their comprehensive research and development of the plan.

Phase One, the assessment portion of the project, will focus primarily on finding, organizing and evaluating existing data related to fish and wildlife populations in the AOC. Information will be compiled from a wide variety of sources, including local experts, on historical conditions, habitat dynamics, restoration opportunities and threats in the lower Bay and Fox River.

Phase Two goals include synthesis of the information, creating a blueprint for protection and restoration activities; identifying specific opportunities for protection, restoration and rehabilitation of fish and wildlife habitat; cataloging past projects to assess their contribution towards delisting thresholds and developing monitoring protocols for measuring the status of fish and wildlife habitat to document the success or failure of specific remediation projects.

Proposers say the project will “test the utility of objective metrics for the ultimate purpose of informing decision-makers at local, regional and national levels, particularly those making decisions involving the status, protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat in other Great Lakes Areas of Concern.”

Work began in fall of 2014 and will continue through August of 2016. This project is particularly significant because it adds to a long-standing and growing involvement of UW-Green Bay scientists and students in solving problems of water quality, ecological health, and economic viability of Green Bay and the Great Lakes in general. Other recent grants by UWGB Natural and Applied Sciences professors Kevin Fermanich, Mike Zorn, Matt Dornbush, Patrick Forsythe and others, demonstrates the important role of UWGB in helping improve environmental quality in the Green Bay ecosystem.

UWGB students take to the tracks for real-life gaming experience

top-story-train-JamUniversity of Wisconsin-Green Bay students Alexander Jacob and Dave Sonnier embarked on a ride of a lifetime when they took part in Train Jam, a 52-hour train ride from Chicago to the Game Developer Conference (GDC) in San Francisco this spring.

They were accompanied by lecturer Ben Geisler of UWGB’s Computer Science academic unit. The 124 participants met in Chicago and split into groups. The groups were then given the theme “On Track” and tasked with creating a game that incorporated this theme in the time it took to travel to the conference.

Jacob and Sonnier joined forces with Jonathan Evraire, a programmer from Canada, to create their game, “Trivial Track.”

“It’s a top-down, Zelda style, game,” said Jacob, “You’re this hero, you have a sword, and there’s traps and dangers all over the level. You’re on a train trying to get to the front of the train where a mustachioed villain has control of the train and if you don’t stop him it runs over the damsel in distress.”

With a time limit of 52 hours, both Sonnier and Jacob focused on keeping the game simple. They had a working version of the game after 12 hours and a complete game finished after 40 hours.

“We were worried about going over scope because it’s easy to make a game were you have too many ideas and it always takes more time to make a game than you think it will,” said Sonnier, “We actually ended up having a complete game a day early. It didn’t look like much, so we actually had time to polish it up, make it look decent.”

in-story-train-jamThroughout the process, Jacob served as lead programmer, Sonnier was the artist and game designer, and Evraire served as a second programmer. All of the games were displayed at the Game Developer Conference and are now playable online.

“I now have a game that I made,” said Jacob, “Not only that but displaying it at the Game Developer Conference… being able to say that, it just feels amazing.”

Jacob and Sonnier were part of the Student Ambassador program on the Train Jam.

Through this experience, 40 students from universities across the United States were provided free transportation and a free ticket to the conference.

For both Jacob and Sonnier, a love of video games came early in life.

“I’ve always loved video games, but in middle school my cousin showed me this program called RPG maker,” said Jacob, “It wasn’t really programming per say. You just clicked buttons to make things happen. But, it was still making games and I put hours into that. It was so much fun, and ever since then I’ve had a desire to get into video game programming.”

For Sonnier, that love of gaming began with art.

“My dad bought the Super Nintendo when it came out in the early nineties and I kind of grew up with that,” said Sonnier, “I used to do a lot of drawing from video games. I was going to be an art major, but that wasn’t quite working out well for me. I didn’t want to do it as a career. So, I revisited that idea, started teaching myself programming, and now I’m almost done with a computer science degree.”

Both Jacob and Sonnier were able to gain experience at UW-Green Bay from lecturer Ben Geisler.

“He’s just been the greatest resource I’ve ever had in game development,“ said Jacob, “He is such a good guy and so fun to work with.”

With experiences such as these, Sonnier has been able to see an improvement in his programming skills.

“I can definitely tell that I was a terrible programmer before I came to Green Bay, having taught myself,” he said. “I’ve learned how to be better at it and become more readable for other people. I can’t even read the stuff that I used to write before.”

Looking to the future, Jacob, a May 2015 graduate, is hopeful that the experience will provide a solid base of networks to begin his career.

“The whole experience not only looks great on my resume, but you should see the stack of business cards I have,” he said, “I’ve started talking to an artist I met out there to make art for a game I’m currently working on. So, lots of contacts and just really good experience.”

His advice for future students? Get hands-on experience both in and out of the classroom.

“You will need to do side projects and make your own games on the side,” he said, “People are looking for that.”

(Photo at top — from left to right: Curtis Zuehls, Raven Software; Alexander Jacob, UWGB; Dave Sonnier, UWGB; Norm Nazaroff, Human Head; Ben Geisler, UWGB instructor; Mac Diedrich, Anvil Drop.)
Photos submitted by Ben Geisler. Story by Katelyn Staaben.

Jasen transitioned from homeschool to college with help from faculty

top-story-home-schoolFor many students, the transition from high school to college can be daunting. But for homeschooled students, that switch comes with an even potentially deeper set of challenges.

That was the experience initially for Education major Lexi Jasen. “I was very used to doing my own thing,” said the senior who will graduate in May 2015 with highest of honors. “My mom gave me a lot of control as far as planning my own curriculum and my schedule, as long as she approved it. But she gave me a lot of freedom. She knew I would be very responsible and I would get it done.”

After homeschooling through high school, Jasen began her college experience at UW-Sheboygan before transferring to UW-Green Bay.

“It is very different to have your own expectations and then to adapt to multiple professors with different expectations for different classes,” she said, “But honestly, the hardest thing for me is the actual sitting in class. I don’t take notes. I’m a doodler. Notes don’t help me at all. That’s not how I learn.”

Jasen turned to her UWGB faculty members for guidance.

“There are some professors, especially in the Education department, who have really gotten to know me and that has been wonderful.”

Their support motivated Jasen to become an active participant in her own learning and to the betterment of those around her. She is a mentor in the Phuture Phoenix program, serves as the president of UW-Green Bay’s Student Wisconsin Education Association and is in the process of creating an honor society for the Education department.

After graduating this May and completing her student teaching, Jasen hopes to find a position as a teacher and one day open her own charter school.

“I want to do something fairly similar to the Phantom Knight charter school which I’ve worked with through Phuture Phoenix,” she said, “They are very project based and inspire independent learning — very similar to how I learned — and I know there are many other people out there like me. My goal, eventually, is to give students more of a say in their learning, because then they’re going to be more motivated to do it and more interested in it.”

Jasen feels other homeschooled students can be just as successful if they speak up and ask for the help that they need.

“The homeschoolers that I know and grew up with are kind of like me and they know how they learn and they now what they need in order to succeed. The more I communicated that with my professors, the more successful I was in those classes, and I think that that is something a lot of people are really hesitant to do.”
Photo and story by Katelyn Staaben.

Photos: UW-Green Bay at Posters in the Rotunda 2015

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Seven standout student researchers from UW-Green Bay were selected to join fellow students from across the state in exhibiting at the 12th Annual “Posters in the Rotunda” spotlight event at the State Capitol in Madison on April 22.

Undergraduates from each of the System’s 26 campuses set up poster displays to share the findings of their diverse research subjects which, in many cases, are the culmination of multiple academic years of study and collaboration with faculty mentors and community partners throughout Wisconsin.

The UW-Green Bay delegation was led by Chancellor Gary L. Miller, Provost Stephen Fritz and faculty members Jennifer Lanter and Gabriel Saxton-Ruiz. Students presenting were:

  • Lauren Anderson of Green Bay and Noel Craig of Shawano, Efforts Directed Toward the Synthesis of Obolactone, faculty adviser Julie Wondergem, Natural and Applied Sciences;
  • Katharine Bright of Green Bay and Kayla Hucke of Hartland, Impact of Phonology and Number on Children’s Novel Plural Production, faculty advise 
Jennifer Lanter, Human Development.
  • Lindsay Hansen of Kiel, Monitoring the Importance of River Mouth and Shoreline Habitats for Migratory Birds at Kingfisher Farm and Nearby Natural Areas in Manitowoc County, faculty adviser Robert Howe;
  • Christa Kananen of Sobieski, Drawdown of the Potentiometric Surface in the Cambrian-Ordovician Aquifer in Marinette County, faculty adviser John Luczaj, Natural and Applied Sciences;
  • Julia Rose Shariff, of Green Bay, The Lost Connection: Benefits of Being a Bilingual Professional in the U.S. Healthcare System
, with faculty adviser Christina Ortiz, Humanistic Studies.

(Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)

Photos by Cassie Alfheim, Office of Grants and Research

UWGB senior artwork now on display at Lawton Gallery

top-senior-showIt’s that time of year again — we’re getting ready to bid farewell to another group of graduating seniors, and many of those students are showing their tremendous talent before they leave us next month. In that vein, the Lawton Gallery in Theatre Hall is featuring the works of five graduating Art and Graphic Design majors through April 23. They are Holly Free: installation with ceramics and sand, Brandon Langer: light installation titled “Live Nude GIFs”, Laura Schley: oil painting portraits, Gena Selby: prints, and Phil Putzer: metal work. It is the first of two senior exhibitions, the second scheduled from May 3 to 14. We’ve captured some of the work in this photo gallery, but encourage you to stop by the Lawton in person. All Lawton Gallery events are free and open to the public. The Gallery is open Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

(Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)
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Photos by Sam Zingsheim, photo intern, Marketing and University Communication

Academic Excellence Symposium spotlights student stars of 2015

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Select students representing academic fields from across campus gathered in the Phoenix Room Tuesday (April 7) for the 14th annual UW-Green Bay Academic Excellence Symposium spotlighting student research and art. About 60 students presented 35 exhibits, including students (above) of Human Biology Prof. Craig Hanke who displayed a poster detailing their group research on “The Physiologic Effects of Video and Audio Stimuli on the Human Body.” (Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)
 14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015   14th Annual Academic Excellence Symposium, University Union, UW-Green Bay, April 7, 2015
Photos by Eric Miller, Marketing and University Communication