Category: Leading & Learning

Star faculty, academic programs, students, campus leaders, student leaders, community leaders, special achievements


After Thoughts speaker Herdman hits on all cylinders with holism and healthcare talk

UW-Green Bay’s After Thoughts is meant for learning, enrichment and fun. Tuesday evening’s speaker Associate Professor of Nursing Heather Herdman hit on all cylinders.

In front of a full house in the Grand Foyer of the Weidner Center, Herdman managed to educate and inspire while giving the audience a new understanding of the history of holism in healthcare, and why our region and our country have a long way to go.

“Holism, health and healing are inextricably linked,” she said. That doesn’t mean that one patient can rely on just one method of treatment or prevention. “After all, when there is a tragic accident, we really do want the trauma surgeon.”

“I am a nurse, and I cannot do a presentation without mentioning Florence Nightingale,” joked Herdman. “Nightingale was the first person who focused on unity and wellness and the interrelationships of human beings to events and environment. She also was the first to use statistics to prove her theories and show the outcomes — that people really do get better care with fresh air, light and quiet, for example.” Another first for Nightingale was her recognition of post-traumatic stress disorder in soldiers and the need to treat more than the physical injury.

Herdman encouraged the need to pursue integrative healthcare — essentially treating the mind, body and spirit at the same time — treating patients as more than the sum of their illnesses. Switching the model from a reductionist model where treatment is given for a symptom to a more holistic model, where prevention and treating the whole person — his or her environment, genetic history, events, situations, life stages — could wipe out some of the top most treatable and debilitating illnesses (diabetes, obesity, heart failure, asthma, for example) to the savings of billions of dollars in healthcare costs.

“Our system doesn’t pay for prevention. It needs to start focusing on paying for prevention and health promotion,” Herdman says. “And evidence-based healthcare should be the only acceptable standard.” As an example, she said that studies showed technology doesn’t always determine consistently better results. A robotics surgery may be no more effective than a surgery performed through traditional methods, but the costs of the new technology is pressuring the healthcare system to the point of financial disaster. “We can’t continue to do what we have been doing.”

Herdman said some hospitals and research centers (Mayo and the University of Minnesota, for instance) are beginning to look at holistic opportunities because solubility of the nation’s healthcare system is going to demand it. Other countries — England and Germany, for instance — have years of documented success with holistic healing.

“We need to pay for prevention, and the healthcare providers that can guide it,” said Herdman. “We need to move to evidence-based healthcare being the only acceptable standard, and we need large demonstration projects – possibly funded by philanthropists or healthcare providers that see this as the sustainable direction.”

“Integrative healthcare puts the patient at the center, focuses on prevention and is preventive, predictive and personalized,” she said.

Herdman has held leadership positions with national and international nursing organizations. She is widely recognized for her expertise in holistic care and has studied clinical aromatherapy, massage and herbal therapies.

Now in its fifth full season, After Thoughts seeks to connect members of the community with UW-Green Bay. The gatherings showcase talented women among University faculty, staff and alumni, and convene men and women after their workday for learning, enrichment and fun.

The next After Thoughts presentation will be by Professors Alison Gates (fiber arts) and Heidi Sherman (history) regarding their collaborative Flax Project — a multi-year interdisciplinary study that recreates the ancient processing of flax to linen, from seed to cloth to paper. Find out more about their upcoming presentation on the After Thoughts website.

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UWGB connections provide heavy lifting for art event

UW-Green Bay art faculty member Professor Christine Style, as well as a number of UWGB alumni, staff and current students, found a unique way to put ink on paper recently — a multi-ton steamroller.

The Steamroller Print event on September 5-6 was part of a multifaceted “Exquisite Corpse” project organized by Hardy Gallery in Ephraim, Wis. with Style’s guidance.

The Village of Ephraim steamroller was used as a giant printing press, rolling over the inked boards to transfer an image onto paper to create six-foot high printed figures. Twenty artists carved woodblocks for the steamroller print event included eight UWGB students and alumni along with other Door County artists.

In addition to guiding the steamroller prints, Style was the project organizer for a the Exquisite Corpse Print Exchange. Style solicited and recruited 28 Wisconsin artists from throughout the state to design and produce an original print edition of either the head, torso, waist or legs section — later to be randomly combined to complete seven 44-inch high full figures that are on display in The Hardy Gallery.

Digital images of the exchange prints were then used by Prof. Style to design and produce interactive flipbooks that are for sale at The Hardy Gallery. “The Exquisite Corpse Head-to-Toe and End-to-End” exhibit continues through October 13 at The Hardy Gallery on the Anderson Dock. One full set of 28 11″ x 15″ original prints are now part of the UWGB Printmaking Collection.

“Exquisite corpse” is an early 20th century parlor game by which images are collectively created with each artist knowing only his or her part and where to meet up with the other parts.

UWGB artists who participated in the event were current students Brian Galloway and Natalie Vann, and former UWGB students Billy Wenner, Gena Selby, Donna Bensen, Philip Enderby, Brandon Langer, Nadia Juhnke and Chad Peters. UWGB alumni and art instructors Johanna Winters, Danica Oudeans and Don Kroumpos, and UWGB Arts Management graduate Anne Soderlund, an intern at The Hardy Gallery, also worked with the group.


Photos contributed by Dennis Connolly and Scott Roberts

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UW-Green Bay hosts Phuture Phoenix visits Oct. 13, 15

UW-Green Bay will host its 12th annual Phuture Phoenix Days Tuesday, Oct. 13 and Thursday, Oct. 15, welcoming nearly 1,400 area fifth-graders who will tour campus and explore life as potential college students.

UW-Green Bay’s signature Phuture Phoenix program partners with schools that have high percentages of students from low-income families and encourages students to graduate from high school and pursue a college education.

The program has hosted a total of 17,241 fifth grade students since it began in 2003. To help support the large number of participants, there will be more than 250 UW-Green Bay students serving as role models and group leaders for the day and at least 120 faculty and staff members participating.

This year’s campus visit intends to offer the visiting fifth-graders a varied look at the college experience, introducing them to multiple aspects of campus life. Every fifth-grader and their UWGB mentors will visit a lecture, a residence hall, the Kress Events Center, and enjoy a meal in the Weidner Center or the University Union’s Phoenix Room. Additionally, numerous UW-Green Bay students and faculty members have planned special, large-group activities for students to interact with peers from their own and other participating schools. A few of these activities include exploration of the Cofrin Library archives, interactive improvisational games, a “slime laboratory,” printmaking, and “College 101” presentations touching upon financial aid, admissions, advising and social work.

Phuture Phoenix Day is a coordinated effort to inspire academic success and alert children to educational opportunities available to them. Phuture Phoenix programming helps prepare elementary school students for college early, says Jenny Woldt, a fifth-grade teacher at Jefferson Elementary School and fan of the program.

“You have to start in kindergarten, get it in their brain that they are college bound no matter where they come from, and that they just need to work hard in school and work hard in their community, and they can get there,” Woldt says.

New to the Tuesday field trip this year are expanded opportunities for fifth-graders to explore the Kress Events Center and UW-Green Bay’s Office of Residence Life, getting a feel for fitness and recreational options and on-campus housing.

“The Office of Residence Life is happy to be able to participate in the Phuture Phoenix program, as it’s never too early to introduce the concept of attending college,” says UW-Green Bay Director of Residence Life, Gail Sims-Aubert. “It’s so important that today’s youth understand going to college means they will be a part of a vibrant educational experience both inside and outside the classroom. This program is an outstanding opportunity to provide a sneak peak of life on campus.”

Brent Tavis, Assistant Athletics Director for Events and Operations, agrees, adding,  “The Kress Events Center is very excited to be able to host the Phuture Phoenix participants every year. It’s an excellent experience for the participants and for the Kress. We get to expose kids to a great atmosphere of sports, fitness, and activities that we hope will make their time here at UW-Green Bay more memorable.”

For more information about Phuture Phoenix.



New academic year brings new master’s in Data Science

(Photo above courtesy of UW-Extension)

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay marks the Sept. 2 start of the fall semester and the 2015-16 academic year with the debut of the first online master’s degree in data science ever offered in the UW System.

UW-Green Bay is a partner in the new Master’s of Data Science degree with UW-Extension and five other UW System universities, in Eau Claire, La Crosse, Oshkosh, Stevens Point and Superior. Faculty from each of the participating campuses will teach the online classes.

Officials say the new degree responds to one of America’s fastest growing fields as businesses and organizations seek to harness vast amounts of data — newly available through various technological innovations — to make better, data-driven decisions.

“The exponential growth in data generation, and the need to get hands around this data, has led businesses scrambling for ways to hone their strategies, improve existing processes and bolster innovation in their products and services,” says Gaurav Bansal, associate professor of management, information science and statistics at UW-Green Bay.

Adds Bansal, who will direct the Master’s of Data Science program at UW-Green Bay, “This program harnesses not only the faculty expertise from different UW campuses but also different academic disciplines including Computer Science, Statistics, Information Technology Management, Business Management and Communication. The program has been developed with input from Industry leaders and is closely aligned with the business needs in this area.”

The curriculum will be grounded in computer science, math and statistics, management and communication. Students will learn how to clean, organize, analyze and interpret large and complex data sets using the latest tools and analytical methods. Admission to the program will require a bachelor’s degree and a 3.0 GPA. Aptitude tests such as the GMAT and GRE will not be required.

“Our ability to collect and interpret data is crucial to the success of our business,” says Matt Mueller, senior vice president of finance and chief financial officer for Schreiber Foods of Green Bay, an advocate of the new program. “Decisions that we make — from providing market insights, to developing modern capabilities, to creating efficiencies in our manufacturing environment and everything in between — are data-driven. We employ a number of professionals (in this area), and I see this online master’s degree program in Data Science as another great resource for us.”

Bansal says tuition will compares favorably to competing graduate programs from other institutions. Like other collaborative online University of Wisconsin programs, students will pay the same tuition whether they live in Wisconsin or out-of-state.

The Master of Science in Data Science program is intended for students with a bachelor’s degree in math, statistics, analytics, computer science, or marketing; or three to five years of professional experience as a business intelligence analyst, data analyst, financial analyst, information technology analyst, database administrator, computer programmer, statistician or other related position.

Bansal points also to a report by McKinsey Global Institute that predicts demand for “deep analytical talent” in the United States could be 50 to 60 percent greater than projected supply by 2018. Opportunities have been identified in almost every economic sector: manufacturing, construction, transportation, warehousing, communication, science, health care, computer science, information technology, retail, sales, marketing, finance, insurance, education, government, law enforcement, security and more.

The Master of Science in Data Science joins a growing list of online degree and certificate programs available at UW-Green Bay. Prospective students seeking more information about the Master of Science in Data Science program are encouraged to visit the website, call 1-877-895-3276 or email.



Transforming classrooms: UWGB readies campus for fall semester

Awaiting UWGB biology students this year is an upgrade to the Exercise Physiology lab with state-of-the-art treadmill and high-end cycle ergometer to measure oxygen consumption (V02). The ability to measure oxygen consumption (VO2) enables the testing of athletes’ maximum aerobic capacity, or “VO2 max.”

According to Prof. James Marker, knowing VO2 max helps determine fitness levels, assess adaptations to training (increases), and prescribe exercise intensity. (e.g., training at 75% VO2 max.) Since oxygen consumption can easily be converted to caloric expenditure, being able to measure oxygen consumption can be used to determine caloric expenditure of a given activity, i.e., how many calories one burns. One can also use oxygen consumption to determine how efficient a person is when exercising.

Green Bay Cross County Coach Mike Kline helped Professors Marker and Amanda Nelson run some initial graded exercise tests as the manufacturer of the equipment and Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences Scott Furlong look on. The equipment is used in the Exercise Physiology classes and in research by UW-Green Bay faculty.

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 Exercise Physiology Lab gets upgrade with new equipment,  Fall Semester 2015, UW-Green Bay Exercise Physiology Lab gets upgrade with new equipment,  Fall Semester 2015, UW-Green Bay Exercise Physiology Lab gets upgrade with new equipment,  Fall Semester 2015, UW-Green Bay Exercise Physiology Lab gets upgrade with new equipment,  Fall Semester 2015, UW-Green Bay Exercise Physiology Lab gets upgrade with new equipment,  Fall Semester 2015, UW-Green Bay Exercise Physiology Lab gets upgrade with new equipment,  Fall Semester 2015, UW-Green Bay Exercise Physiology Lab gets upgrade with new equipment,  Fall Semester 2015, UW-Green Bay Exercise Physiology Lab gets upgrade with new equipment,  Fall Semester 2015, UW-Green Bay


From struggle to stand-out: Canzoneri finds success at UW-Green Bay

In a few days communication student William Canzoneri will take his last class at UW-Green Bay and his transformation from undecided major to confident and experienced graduate will be complete. Watch out world.

His happy ending is not something Canzoneri would have pictured while in high school.
“I wasn’t the most diligent student in high school, despite making varsity on both football and wrestling. I think I finished somewhere under a 3.0.”

His college career began inauspiciously. He dropped out of technical college, re-enrolled and then prepared to transfer. Two factors influenced his transfer location: a $25 career assessment test and a visit to a friend at UW-Green Bay.

“The career assessment gave me three top choices: writer, public relations, and FBI agent,” he said, “Not wanting to be a starving artist despite how much I enjoyed writing, and the fact that being an FBI agent sounded intimidating, I chose public relations.”

As for what school to attend, the visit to a friend solidified Canzoneri’s decision to attend UW-Green Bay.

“I fell in love with it,” he said, “The beautiful trails, the nature, the openness. So different from the city.”

After transferring to UW-Green Bay, Canzoneri jumped at the chance to gain even more experience by joining the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA). After serving on the fundraising committee, Canzoneri was elected as Treasurer of the organization for the 2014-2015 academic year.

“The PRSSA has allowed me the chance to work on real PR plans, network with incredible professionals and fellow students around the country, and make great friends.”

Among other opportunities, Canzoneri was invited to join Phi Kappa Phi, the nation’s oldest and most selective honor society for all academic disciplines; he completed an editorial assistant internship; and he and his UWGB classmates were part of the team that won the Edelman Case Study Competition in Chicago, in Spring 2015, competing against college teams from across the nation. Most recently, he was chosen as a finalist for “Talking the Talk,” a competition hosted by Time Warner Sports. See his audition here.

“All of these successes have both challenged me, matured me, and made me more confident,” he said.

When looking to the future, Canzoneri is focused on constant improvement.

“I always tell myself: You need to do better Bill,” he said, “That shapes my thought process. I want to do more, work harder, make better habits.”

This change, from struggling student to stand out success, is something that Canzoneri is thankful his UWGB education provided him.

“From sundown at Lambeau Cottage to getting happily lost somewhere in the Cofrin Arboretum, I salute you UW-Green Bay,” he said, “You’re outstanding, incredible, fantastic. Thanks for everything.”

Story by 2015 UWGB graduate Katelyn Staaben

UW-Green Bay International Education and Study Abroad have banner years

top-story-internationalThey are UW-Green Bay’s ambassadors to the far reaches of the world. A record 229 UWGB students traveled to 30 locations outside the United States in 2014-15. The most popular destinations — Cuernavaca, Mexico, Spain, Italy and South Africa. And 2015-16 enrollment numbers are just as promising.

UWGB’s Office of International Education (OIE) also helped International students navigate life in the United States, the unpredictable weather of Green Bay, and the culture shock of a foreign land. Those students came from 30 countries with nearly 25 percent of them from China, followed by Brazil, Germany, France, Japan and Canada.

Without the OIE, students who often are still learning English as a Second Language (ESL) would be incredibly challenged by instances sometimes even challenging for US residents — airport pick-up and academics, orientation, immigration, programming, financial and health insurance, taxes, driver’s licenses and more.

OIE professionals expect an equally busy year, having already enrolled about 45 new students, with applications still being accepted for 2015-16. New international students are picked up from Green Bay’s Austin Straubel airport on August 24 and 25 and orientation begins almost immediately.

“The students are exposed to community culture with a four-day orientation program designed around local events (Art Street, Farmers Market, Lambeau Field tour) and a trip to Door County,” OIE Student Coordinator Kristy Aoki says. “They also receive an overview of campus services, academic orientation and placement testing. Some international students arrived over summer and are already participating in a summer Intensive English Program.” The mentoring continues all year long and even after students leave UWGB.

“In some ways, we are always their connection to this country,” says Aoki. “The Office of International Education staff becomes an important point of contact for most incoming international students and outgoing study abroad students. Imagine moving to a new country and relearning a completely new system for just about everything from basic cultural norms and creating new friendships to navigating a new educational system, health care and immigration laws. Both studying abroad and international students are brave and courageous for taking the risk to try something new and truly step outside of their comfort zone.”

OIE staff members are rejuvenated by the impact these experiences make on the students they serve — both those that Study Abroad, and those that make UWGB their home for just a short time. Former International Student Niklas Haemer, native of Germany, was so moved by his experience, that he left this grateful post recently on the UWGB Facebook page:

“Unfortunately everything comes to an end and now it is time to leave something behind which has shaped my life a lot… I will never forget this time of my life…I want to thank the people who made this year unbelievably awesome.”

OIE Director Brent Blahnik says the outcomes for students in “mobility programs,” (both study abroad and international students) enrolled at UWGB — have impact beyond cultural competence.

“Studies show that students who study abroad improve their GPA’s and retain higher academic performance in the semesters following a sojourn abroad. Students report greater independence, self-confidence, and maturity; and they also develop skills needed for employment including an ability to problem solve and work through ambiguity,” Blahnik says. “Students learn how to thrive in diverse environments, improve foreign language skills, and take calculated risks. Further national studies show that students who study abroad have higher job placement rates in the 12 months following graduation (nearly double) and earn approximately $7,000 per year more than their peers who do not study abroad.”

Those who report back on their study abroad experiences often have similar themes: life-changing, priceless, confidence-building, but student Ben Freeman seemed to capture it best — “It’s only when you get away from everything you thought defined you that you truly discover who you really are.”

Undergraduate researchers honored and recognized

research-top-storyThe experience is worth celebrating, but so is the recognition.

A number of UW-Green Bay undergraduates had a fantastic opportunity to participate in graduate-level research this year and were honored among the winners of the outstanding presentation awards at the 14th Annual UW-System Symposium for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity.

Their research and presentation was one of 16 finalists selected from among 400 presentations representing undergraduate research from across the UW System.

Their presentation — “Phoenix GPS: A Wholistic College Transition Approach for Underrepresented Students” — reports on the year-one results of an intensive, year-long enrichment program for first year students at UW-Green Bay. Team members were Hannah Blum, Ashley Grant, Jordan Grapentine, Sarah Londo and Alex Wilson. Serving as their mentor was Denise Bartell, UWGB professor of Human Development.

“These students are a shining example of the value of undergraduate research experience for students from all majors,” said Bartell. “Despite coming into the project with very different levels of prior research experience, all developed graduate-level research and group work skills, had the opportunity to present at a national professional conference, and are currently working with me on a manuscript for publication of this data.”

Like her fellow student researchers, Alex Wilson served as a peer mentor in the program. She said the new challenge helped her to grow in ways unexpected: “I came to the realization that the project had a positive effect on my attitude and academics, and that I now place a greater perspective on empathy.”

“I wasn’t sure what to expect, but after the first semester, I found that I was providing to students what I haven’t always had in my life,” she said. “As a low income, first-generation college student, I understand that there are different barriers for every student. Providing opportunities for first-year students to succeed, despite the barriers, became something that I believe in. The types of experiences that the GPS students are having during their first year acts as an equalizer. Our data shows that many of the opportunities that we provide, such as tutoring, relationship building and service learning will create a learning environment that a student is more likely to want to stay in.”

The Gateways to Phirst Year Success (GPS) program provides historically underrepresented students with an engaging learning community experience, a network of mentors, and opportunities to develop academic agency and connections to campus and community.

GPS students earned significantly higher GPA’s, engaged in high impact experiences at higher rates, and were retained at significantly higher rates than similarly situated students who did not participate in GPS, and these results were strongest for students of color.

Underrepresented students who participate in GPS are 17.6% more likely to be retained at UWGB into year two (92.2% vs. 74.6%) and 13.1% more likely to be retained through the end of the second year (81.3% vs. 68.2%), as compared to underrepresented students who don’t participate in GPS.

Underrepresented (UR) GPS students earn significantly higher GPA’s than other underrepresented students in the first year (3.07 vs. 2.74), are significantly more likely to have declared a major (60.9% vs. 49.0%), and report participating in almost twice the number of high impact experiences during their first year (5.4 vs. 3.0). They are also significantly more likely to utilize campus resources in their first year when they need help, and participate in significantly more co-curricular activities, as compared to other UR students.

The GPS program also eliminates the equity gap for UR students in UWGB’s Human Biology 102 course — GPS students performed as well as represented students in this course.

Researching and quantifying the data was only one step in the process for the student researchers. Presenting their data to larger audiences presented a learning curve as well.

“The first few times we presented, we relied heavily on our peer mentor to paint a picture, but we’ve all gotten really comfortable with the numbers and data collection,” Wilson said. “The statistics demonstrate the successes that we saw during the time spent with students.”

Wilson also found that the lessons she learned translated well to outside the project… even outside the University.

“I talk about this program quite a bit,” she said. “The challenges I experienced as a peer mentor come up regularly in my work environment and I have a better idea how to manage. The knowledge I’ve gained as a research assistant is incredibly valuable. It was unexpected, but the growth I’ve witnessed through involvement has been obvious and important in my everyday life.”

Bartell said the program speaks volumes about the power of students’ commitment to helping others maximize their success in college.

“This group of research students represent a diverse set of majors, from Human Development to Spanish to Human Biology,” says Bartell. “They all chose to participate in the research project in order to continue their service to the University and to the underrepresented first-year students who are served by the GPS Program.”
(Pictured in the photo at the top: From left to right, Jordan Grapentine, Ashley Grant, Hannah Blum, Prof. Denise Bartell, Alex Wilson and Sarah Londo at the National Resource Center’s First-Year Experience Conference in Dallas, February 2015)

Lones, Blake pursue competitive summer research opportunities

lorenzo-top-storyWhile some students will spend summer in relaxation mode, UW-Green Bay’s Lorenzo Lones will be working in a lab at one of the top research programs in the nation.

Likewise, UW-Green Bay junior Tresavoya Blake, a History and Democracy and Justice Studies major, will be interning at Loyola University Chicago in its Multicultural Affairs Division this summer as part of a National Undergraduate Fellowship Program.

Each are mentored and encouraged by Justin Mallett, the director of UWGB’s American Intercultural Center.

Lones, a double major in Psychology and Human Biology, will be participating in the University of Iowa Summer Research Opportunity Program throughout June and July. The eight-week program is designed to prepare participants for future doctoral studies through involvement in research and other scholarly activities.

While at the University of Iowa, Lones will be working with Dr. Andrew Pieper, MD, Ph.D. and Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology and Radiation Oncology.

“One of the things that interested me is that the professor I will be working has a very diverse lab team,” said Lones, “He has women, Latinos, African-Americans, so it is just a very diverse team. Also, his research is closely aligned with the type of research I want to do in my career.”

Lones will be working with Pieper to study the effects of two chemicals on mice: One that helps create new brain cells in the memory center of the brain and one that helps stop cell death.

“We have a lot of psychiatric medication that deals with symptoms, but his lab is actually looking at what is causing the symptoms and trying to change the course of the disorder in the brain instead of just alleviating symptoms,” Lones said.

This experience will be a first for Lones who says he has never worked directly in a lab such as this before.

“This will be the first time I’m in the lab actually manipulating things,” he said, “As far as animals are concerned too, I’ll be working with the rats. So that will be a pretty nifty hands-on experience for me.”

Entering UWGB, he thought he would someday be a school psychologist. “I took Prof. Dennis Lorenz’s physiological psychology class and started studying the nervous system and then realized I really like understanding how the brain works.”

He followed that with a molecular biology course with Prof. Uwe Pott, and is honing his career path to research.

“What I want to study is not necessarily the act of giving treatment, but looking at what is the course of treatment… instead of of being a doctor, doing medical research that doctors can benefit from.”

Blake-storyFor Tresavoya Blake, the fellowship is an extension of involvement at UW-Green Bay. She laughs as she begins her list… “Women of Color, Black Student Union, the Diversity Taskforce…”

Her involvement provided a strong case for acceptance into the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program through the National Association for Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA), and the benefits associated with it — such as the eight-week fellowship at Loyola.

“I’ll be actually working with the different staff in different departments, working on any projects they might want me to do,” she said, “Basically learning more about the student affairs field and narrowing down which department or division of student affairs I would be most interested in pursuing when I go to graduate school and eventually start my own career in student affairs.”

Both Lones and Blakes said they understand the need for mentoring and appreciate the faculty and staff who support and encourage them.

“After my experiences here at Green Bay, especially in the American Intercultural Center, and seeing how they helped me just stay here and become more comfortable in the university, that’s the kind of impact I want to make on students in general,” Blake said. “In my future, I want to be the person that helps students of color, underrepresented students, and students in general, navigate through college.”

Lones said he is grateful to the faculty and staff that have helped him prepare for this opportunity, including Prof. Kris Vespia, who worked with him over winter break to help prepare his personal statement.

“The multicultural advisors, Crystal, Justin, and Mai, they do a really good job at keeping me on a straight path,” he said, “The faculty here at the school have been tremendous. They’ve been extremely supportive. I don’t know where I’d be without them.”

Story by Katelyn Staaben, editorial intern

Healing habitats: Grant to build comprehensive plan for fish, wildlife

wolf-howe-top-storyMore than a dozen undergraduate and graduate students have a tremendous opportunity to work alongside UW-Green Bay Professors Bob Howe and Amy Wolf on a comprehensive plan to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the region.

Howe, Wolf and UWGB staff, in collaboration with The Nature Conservancy (TNC), are the recipients of a $471,000 Environmental Protection Agency/Department of Natural Resources grant to study fish and wildlife conditions and threats in what is termed the “Lower Green Bay and Fox River Area of Concern” and its immediately contributing watershed.

“This project is important for our region because it will yield one of the most, if not the most, specific plans for improving fish and wildlife habitat in the lower Bay and Fox River,” said Howe.

Howe considers the assessment, and the recommendations vital to the future regional economy and quality of life.

“Although the AOC is clearly degraded, more and more evidence has shown that this is a ‘world class’ site for freshwater fish, colonial and migratory birds, and other wildlife species,” said Howe. “I view Green Bay as comparable to Chesapeake Bay on the East Coast and San Francisco Bay on the West Coast — places where natural resources have experienced degradation, but places where these resources are still very much alive and are vital to the future local economy and quality of life,” he said.

Lower Green Bay and the Fox River below the DePere Dam comprise one of 43 Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOC’s) designated in 1987 by the International Joint Commission of Canada and the United States through the U.S.-Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The ultimate goal of the UWGB/TNC project is to help develop a strategy for improving conditions in the AOC so that it can be removed or “de-listed” from its impaired status.

Loss of fish and wildlife habitat is one of the most significant reasons why the Lower Green Bay and Fox River AOC was designated as an AOC. Documented (WDNR) causes of ecological and economic impairment of the Lower Green Bay and Fox River AOC include:
• habitat destruction and fragmentation due to urban and industrial development and stream channelization;
• dredging and filling of aquatic habitats along the Fox River corridor;
• wetland degradation from human activity and changing water levels;
• disruption of hydrologic connectivity by road construction and other human activities;
• loss of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Duck Creek delta area of the lower Bay because of turbid water and hyper eutrophication;
• destruction of barrier islands in the Cat Island Chain by high water and storms;
• reduction in underwater plants and littoral vegetation by invasive carp;
• silt deposition and re-suspension of sediments in the Lower Bay; and
spread of invasive plant species.

Alongside UWGB staff members Erin Giese, Michael Stiefvater, Kimberlee McKeefry, and Bobbie Webster, Howe and Wolf are working with students on this two-year, two-phase project to comprehensively assess existing habitat conditions and formulate a protection and restoration plan in the affected areas.

In each phase, UW-Green Bay students will be able to assist the faculty and staff members and Wisconsin DNR and TNC collaborators in their comprehensive research and development of the plan.

Phase One, the assessment portion of the project, will focus primarily on finding, organizing and evaluating existing data related to fish and wildlife populations in the AOC. Information will be compiled from a wide variety of sources, including local experts, on historical conditions, habitat dynamics, restoration opportunities and threats in the lower Bay and Fox River.

Phase Two goals include synthesis of the information, creating a blueprint for protection and restoration activities; identifying specific opportunities for protection, restoration and rehabilitation of fish and wildlife habitat; cataloging past projects to assess their contribution towards delisting thresholds and developing monitoring protocols for measuring the status of fish and wildlife habitat to document the success or failure of specific remediation projects.

Proposers say the project will “test the utility of objective metrics for the ultimate purpose of informing decision-makers at local, regional and national levels, particularly those making decisions involving the status, protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat in other Great Lakes Areas of Concern.”

Work began in fall of 2014 and will continue through August of 2016. This project is particularly significant because it adds to a long-standing and growing involvement of UW-Green Bay scientists and students in solving problems of water quality, ecological health, and economic viability of Green Bay and the Great Lakes in general. Other recent grants by UWGB Natural and Applied Sciences professors Kevin Fermanich, Mike Zorn, Matt Dornbush, Patrick Forsythe and others, demonstrates the important role of UWGB in helping improve environmental quality in the Green Bay ecosystem.