Category: Leading & Learning

Star faculty, academic programs, students, campus leaders, student leaders, community leaders, special achievements


Labyrinth walk has deep significance in a year of religious turmoil

Creating and walking a labyrinth has been a capstone activity for award-winning Prof. Regan Gurung’s freshman seminar: “Gods, Ghosts and Goblins,” each year. This year, however, it may take on just a bit more meaning, and move students a bit more deeply.

“Our seminar class will be creating our own labyrinth and walking it to personify many elements of class discussion and experience first hand the wisdom of the ancients,” explains Gurung. “Given the secular nature of the experience and significant current religious turmoil and prejudices abounding, we will highlight a message of acceptance by also adding symbols of many different belief systems. It is important to be knowledgeable about diverse beliefs and respect people’s decision to pick their beliefs. Just like the rotten fruit, we should not allow one bad apple to taint the entire bushel.”

Gurung says strong a college experience always sparks intellectual growth and venturing into new ideas.

“One of the most fascinating topics of growth is belief,” says Gurung. “Humans hold many diverse beliefs and over the centuries gods, ghosts, and goblins have populated world religions, legends, and mythology. One first year seminar class focuses on answering the question of why people believe. What purpose does it serve? How do beliefs grow? This interdisciplinary class examines different disciplines such as psychology, biology, anthropology, and theology, to answer these questions.

Gurung says that at the core of most belief systems is reflection and one of the longest standing means of reflection is the labyrinth.

“Humans have used labyrinths for centuries as a means of meditation and reflection, to take a break from the world walking into its center, before walking back out into the world again (a labyrinth has only one path, unlike a maze which has many),” he explains. “In true interdisciplinary fashion, the labyrinth also blends science, art, and religion, both in the knowledge needed to create one, and in understanding the brain activity that takes place when you walk one.”

From medieval times, monks have traveled labyrinths in prayer. St. Norbert Abbey in De Pere, for instance, maintains a prayer labyrinth.

“The focus on belief reveals many communalities in purpose, and highlights that regardless of the belief is, the underlying reasons for belief and the way they came about are very often the same.

“In a world with significant ethnic and religious strife, the explorations into belief show how, for the most part, that peoples and the religions of the world are similar. Just like apples and oranges (fruits often exemplified to show difference) are vastly more similar than different, so too are the world’s major religions. And just like you do not throw out an entire bushel for one bad fruit, we should not demonize an entire religion for some extremist practitioners of it.”

Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view or view the album on Flickr.

– Photos by Dan Moore, Outreach and Adult Access


43rd Annual Juried Student Art Exhibition

The Lawton Gallery’s annual juried art exhibition is open to any student enrolled at UW-Green Bay. Consisting solely of student work in a variety of media, the recent exhibition was guest juried by Kendra Bulgrin, director of the James May Gallery in Algoma. All Lawton Gallery events are free and open to the public.

Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view or view the album on Flickr.

– Photos by Kayla Ermer, UW-Green Bay Photography Student


UW-Green Bay Theatre presents “It’s a Wonderful Life”

University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s Theatre and Dance and Music presents the beloved holiday classic It’s A Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play.

The performances of It’s A Wonderful Life will take place Thursday and Friday, Nov. 19-20 at 7:30 p.m. in the Cofrin Family Hall at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts, UW-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

Frank Capra’s classic holiday film was adapted for the stage by Joe Landry in 2006 and quickly became an anticipated annual event in cities across the country. Performed as a live radio broadcast set on Christmas Eve, 1946, audiences are transported to the days of Old Time Radio. An ensemble of 11 actors play dozens of characters, perform commercial jingles and create sound effects to tell the story of Bedford Falls’ George Bailey as he is given a great gift by Clarence Oddbody one fateful Christmas Eve.

Feature-Wonderful-LifeProduction Director and Professor of Theatre, Laura Riddle, is excited to bring It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play to the Weidner Center on the UW-Green Bay campus as a part of the University’s 50th Anniversary celebration. “I have always been a fan of Old Time Radio and tune in to Wisconsin Public Radio every Sunday night to hear rebroadcasts of old radio shows, stories told in a way that invite the listeners to imagine the action in great detail through enhanced underscoring and sound effects. Our production of It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play treats the audience to a look “behind-the scenes” for a live radio broadcast. The audience sees actors changing characters using only their voices and sound effects are created live at a Foley table using objects from corn flakes to water basins.”

All elements are performed live and include a live band playing popular music and holiday songs from the 1940’s. It’s a Wonderful Life is a collaboration of UW-Green Bay Theatre and Dance and UW-Green Bay Music. The original score by Kevin Connors has been custom tailored for the UWGB production by Nick Schommer and Kelsie Holtzheimer, UW-Green Bay Music students who have composed new arrangements and original compositions.

It’s a Wonderful Life directorial/production team: Laura Riddle (Director), Courtney Sherman (Musical Director), Denise Carlson-Gardner (Choreographer), Nick Schommer and Kelsie Holtzheimer (original compositions and arrangements) Jeffrey Paul Entwistle (Scenic Designer), Kaoime E. Malloy (Costume/Make Up Designer), R. Michael Ingraham (Lighting Designer, Technical Designer), Dana Mehlhorn (Sound Designer), Jeff Chesebro and Paul Heim (Foley Designers), David Cook (Assistant Technical Director) Bri Wolfe (Stage Manager).

Wonderful-life2It’s a Wonderful Life cast: Emily Ahrens (Roscoe, IL), Selena Deer (New Berlin, WI), Max Frost (De Pere, WI), Ashley Gutting (Ashwaubenon, WI), Nick Schommer (Jackson, WI), Millie Haushalter (Brillion, WI), Adam Rosenow (Shawano, WI), Talor Sohr (Green Bay, WI), Kit Honkanen (Green Bay, WI), Daniel Taddy (Sturgeon Bay, WI), Tyler Wood (Pulaski, WI)

It’s a Wonderful Life orchestra: Courtney Sherman (Conductor), Laura Cortright, flute (Green Bay, WI), Keton Jennings, sax (Poynette, WI), Gatlin Grimm, trumpet (Green Bay, WI), Joe Russett, trombone (Green Bay, WI), Collin Catalano, upright bass; Bobby Magers, drums (Green Bay, WI), Kyle Sweeney, piano (Fox Point, WI), Ryan Dummer, piano (Green Bay, WI)

It’s a Wonderful Life crew: Matthew Beecher (Assistant Stage Manager) (Milwaukee, WI), Erin Pagenkopf (Assistant Stage Manager) (Sussex, WI), Jake Gerlikovski (Master Electrician) (Green Bay, WI), David Cook (Scene Shop Supervisor), Elizabeth Galba (Costume Shop Supervisor) (Cascade, WI), Cody Von Ruden (Wardrobe Head, Makeup Crew) (Cashton, WI), Katy Kluever (Menasha, WI) and Cody Galligan (Campbellsport, WI) (Wardrobe Crew), Zeb Burks (Sound Technician) (Ettrick, WI), Scene Shop Practicum Students (Carpenters and Costume Technicians), (Electricians and Paint Crew).

Tickets for It’s A Wonderful Life range from $25 to $35. Special pricing for UWGB students is $20. To purchase tickets.



Flax Project: ‘Fiber is not for the weak’

A sizeable campus and community audience learned more Tuesday (Nov. 3) about a hands-on history and art project that is teaching UW-Green Bay students the facts about an industrial-strength plant that shaped life in the ancient and medieval world.

“The Flax Project” was the topic of UW-Green Bay Profs. Heidi Sherman and Alison Gates in a slide-illustrated presentation offered as part of the After Thoughts series at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts.

Historian Sherman and textile artist Gates talked about their efforts since 2011 to perfect the ancient art and practice of turning flax into linen by growing a fiber crop and processing the harvest on a college campus. Although they have planted successful crops each year with teams of new students from History, Art and several other majors, it has never been easy. Especially the processing.

“In the Middle Ages, it was called ‘the agony of the flax,’” Sherman told the audience.
“Fiber is not for the weak,” Gates said. She drew a laugh when she described “scutching,” one of the steps in the process, “as basically just whacking the hell out of the fiber.”

The interdisciplinary work by Sherman and Gates grew out of earlier research at UW-Green Bay suggesting linen made from flax was a history-changing development for societies including the ancient Greeks, who used it to construct lightweight, virtually impenetrable battle armor.

Sherman described her work as “experiential archeology.” She has led student travel trips to Russia where they worked with 1,000-year-old tools and learned that the arduous task of creating linen was something that frequently demanded the communal cooperation of entire villages.

Lessons learned there only amplify the experiences students encounter in harvesting and processing the plants from UW-Green Bay’s small, central-campus plots. Students learn about “rippling” seed bolls from the fiber tips, which must be done before the flax is laid in water to rett (to soak and separate the fiber from the stem) followed by breaking the stem into short segments, scutching to extracting the fibers and “heckling” (combing) the flax before it is spun and woven for use.

Sherman says her history students — relatively few of whom will be professional, Ph.D. historians but many of whom will go on to teach K-12 history or serve as historical interpreters — will occasionally offer up a good-natured grumble if crop-pulling day is hot, or when the harvested flax fibers soaking in children’s wading pools emit powerfully pungent odors. Mostly, though, the students are big fans.

“They love this,” Sherman said. “It’s a way to learn history by getting your hands dirty.”
Gates said that, over the course of the “Flax Project,” she has been learning right alongside her Introduction to Textile students. A trained artist, she said had never much paid attention to the history of textile art created before the first decade or so of the 1900s. The quality of Sherman’s medieval scholarship on flax and linen and the people who worked those materials drew her into the topic, Gates said.

The idea of “growing our own arts supplies here on campus,” was another plus, Gates said. (It became even more appealing when the UWGB Medieval Dye Garden succeeded in growing plants historically used for their ability to yield naturally occurring red, blue and yellow dye for the linen.)

The biggest breakthrough for fiber and textile artists on campus, however, came with the acquisition of a 21st century Hollander beater. Based on a 17th century design, it’s basically an industrial blender that’s “a two-gallon version of what’s in every local paper mill,” Gates said.
As a final result, art students are honing their artisanal skills in creating high-grade linen paper and fine art from material grown at the heart of campus.

(The vivid green flax stands and their pretty blue flowers add visual interest to the decorative planters on the rooftop plaza atop the Student Services Building.)

While linen paper is being created now, production of linen fabric from the Flax Project isn’t likely any time soon, the presenters indicated in response to audience questions. The reasons involve limitations of time, resources and machinery. It was noted that the Vikings are said to have needed seven years to hand-make a single sail of linen, with eight or more “spinners” needed to feed one loom.

UW-Green Bay Dean of Professional Studies Sue Mattison introduced the presentation by noting that Sherman and Gates have presented at national and international conferences. Eva Andersson Strand, one of the world’s leading specialists on Viking-age textile production, visited UW-Green Bay last fall for workshops with faculty and students. Additionally, Mattison noted that Sherman’s hands-on experience with the Flax Project has persuaded some scholars to reexamine long-held notions about the tools and processes used to make early linen fabric.

Photos by student intern Kayla Erma, Office of Marketing and University Communication

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Innovative teaching methods lead to heartfelt relationships, practical learning

It started out as an idea, and worked into a cross-campus, cross-disciplinary, cross-town collaboration with deep relational benefits and stories that span and can be shared for generations to come.

class-unityThe University of Wisconsin-Green Bay class, HUS 483: Documenting Memory, involves students working on multiple projects in oral history and story collection. Led by English Prof. Rebecca Meacham, in coordination with Social Work Professor Gail Trimberger, UW-Green Bay English, Education and Humanistic Studies majors worked with interns from UWGB’s Social Work program to document the lives of Unity palliative patients. Students met with interview subject multiple times, interviewed them, and created transcripts and audio files for the UWGB archives. Unity-partnered students prepared a full-color, hardbound, professionally printed Life Journal, which was proudly presented to the patient.

unity-presents-book“I knew walking in that going out to document a 92 year-old’s life story would be life changing,” reflected UWGB student Hannah Stepp. “Having only lived 21 years myself, adding another 70 years gives you plenty more stories to tell and lessons to share. I think the most moving moment of it all was learning that no matter how many years you’ve lived, there are still moments or people or conversations that ignite feelings that are still very raw. My interviewee in particular began to cry when talking about a member of her family who had been deployed, and it was incredible to me that 70 years after this had occurred it still could bring tears.”

English major Jamie Stahl worked as a photographer throughout the project and said the impact was profound.

“Life-changing seems such a hollow term, but the best under the circumstances,” she said, after sitting in on a number of interviews. “It truly opened my eyes to the treasure of each life, the value in truly listening to another, and the wealth gained in such an exchange. The Documenting Memories class is one I have discussed endlessly in my home community as revolutionary for students, but it also works towards building and valuing the community in which we live. As a future English teacher this will be a lesson I hope to bring a version of into my own classroom!”

unity-second-photoStepp said the experience provided a new perspective for her. As one who is busy with with Student Government, volunteering, school and a job, she said the experience taught her to slow down.

“In my crazy busy life I forgot to slow down and really appreciate my life and observe what is going on around me,” she said. “Life moves so quickly, and one day if you’re lucky like my interviewee, you get to sit back and reminisce on those times. Don’t let it fly past you. I talk about this project nearly every day to my friends and family, because it really had an impact, and I told my interviewee this when we last talked.”

Other members of the class partnered with military veterans, as well as UWGB alumni and notable community liaisons, providing them with similar opportunities. University Archivist Deb Anderson worked with the class as well. The class will be offered again in Spring 2016.

Photos by UWGB student Jamie Stahl and Prof. Rebecca Meacham
Top photo: UWGB student Katie Nieman and Delores, a Unity palliative respite patient
Second photo: Rebecca Meacham (left) and Deb Anderson (second left) with the Documenting Memories class
Third photo: Nieman presents Delores with the life journal she made for her; Lizzie, a Unity Hospice social worker is to the right
Fourth photo: From left to right, Delores, Nieman, Meacham, and Unity’s Christy Brozak

Phuture Phoenix Day 2015

Slideshow: Phuture Phoenix Day I, 2015

The first of two Phuture Phoenix Days this fall brought 950 fifth-graders from across Northeastern Wisconsin to the UW-Green Bay campus on Oct. 13 for a full day of tours, activities and fun. The program builds connections with young students to promote educational attainment and get them thinking about secondary education at a younger age. Student photography interns captured the day in photos.

Photos by Kayla Ermer and Kayla Teske, photo interns, Marketing and University Communications

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After Thoughts speaker Herdman hits on all cylinders with holism and healthcare talk

UW-Green Bay’s After Thoughts is meant for learning, enrichment and fun. Tuesday evening’s speaker Associate Professor of Nursing Heather Herdman hit on all cylinders.

In front of a full house in the Grand Foyer of the Weidner Center, Herdman managed to educate and inspire while giving the audience a new understanding of the history of holism in healthcare, and why our region and our country have a long way to go.

“Holism, health and healing are inextricably linked,” she said. That doesn’t mean that one patient can rely on just one method of treatment or prevention. “After all, when there is a tragic accident, we really do want the trauma surgeon.”

“I am a nurse, and I cannot do a presentation without mentioning Florence Nightingale,” joked Herdman. “Nightingale was the first person who focused on unity and wellness and the interrelationships of human beings to events and environment. She also was the first to use statistics to prove her theories and show the outcomes — that people really do get better care with fresh air, light and quiet, for example.” Another first for Nightingale was her recognition of post-traumatic stress disorder in soldiers and the need to treat more than the physical injury.

Herdman encouraged the need to pursue integrative healthcare — essentially treating the mind, body and spirit at the same time — treating patients as more than the sum of their illnesses. Switching the model from a reductionist model where treatment is given for a symptom to a more holistic model, where prevention and treating the whole person — his or her environment, genetic history, events, situations, life stages — could wipe out some of the top most treatable and debilitating illnesses (diabetes, obesity, heart failure, asthma, for example) to the savings of billions of dollars in healthcare costs.

“Our system doesn’t pay for prevention. It needs to start focusing on paying for prevention and health promotion,” Herdman says. “And evidence-based healthcare should be the only acceptable standard.” As an example, she said that studies showed technology doesn’t always determine consistently better results. A robotics surgery may be no more effective than a surgery performed through traditional methods, but the costs of the new technology is pressuring the healthcare system to the point of financial disaster. “We can’t continue to do what we have been doing.”

Herdman said some hospitals and research centers (Mayo and the University of Minnesota, for instance) are beginning to look at holistic opportunities because solubility of the nation’s healthcare system is going to demand it. Other countries — England and Germany, for instance — have years of documented success with holistic healing.

“We need to pay for prevention, and the healthcare providers that can guide it,” said Herdman. “We need to move to evidence-based healthcare being the only acceptable standard, and we need large demonstration projects – possibly funded by philanthropists or healthcare providers that see this as the sustainable direction.”

“Integrative healthcare puts the patient at the center, focuses on prevention and is preventive, predictive and personalized,” she said.

Herdman has held leadership positions with national and international nursing organizations. She is widely recognized for her expertise in holistic care and has studied clinical aromatherapy, massage and herbal therapies.

Now in its fifth full season, After Thoughts seeks to connect members of the community with UW-Green Bay. The gatherings showcase talented women among University faculty, staff and alumni, and convene men and women after their workday for learning, enrichment and fun.

The next After Thoughts presentation will be by Professors Alison Gates (fiber arts) and Heidi Sherman (history) regarding their collaborative Flax Project — a multi-year interdisciplinary study that recreates the ancient processing of flax to linen, from seed to cloth to paper. Find out more about their upcoming presentation on the After Thoughts website.

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UWGB connections provide heavy lifting for art event

UW-Green Bay art faculty member Professor Christine Style, as well as a number of UWGB alumni, staff and current students, found a unique way to put ink on paper recently — a multi-ton steamroller.

The Steamroller Print event on September 5-6 was part of a multifaceted “Exquisite Corpse” project organized by Hardy Gallery in Ephraim, Wis. with Style’s guidance.

The Village of Ephraim steamroller was used as a giant printing press, rolling over the inked boards to transfer an image onto paper to create six-foot high printed figures. Twenty artists carved woodblocks for the steamroller print event included eight UWGB students and alumni along with other Door County artists.

In addition to guiding the steamroller prints, Style was the project organizer for a the Exquisite Corpse Print Exchange. Style solicited and recruited 28 Wisconsin artists from throughout the state to design and produce an original print edition of either the head, torso, waist or legs section — later to be randomly combined to complete seven 44-inch high full figures that are on display in The Hardy Gallery.

Digital images of the exchange prints were then used by Prof. Style to design and produce interactive flipbooks that are for sale at The Hardy Gallery. “The Exquisite Corpse Head-to-Toe and End-to-End” exhibit continues through October 13 at The Hardy Gallery on the Anderson Dock. One full set of 28 11″ x 15″ original prints are now part of the UWGB Printmaking Collection.

“Exquisite corpse” is an early 20th century parlor game by which images are collectively created with each artist knowing only his or her part and where to meet up with the other parts.

UWGB artists who participated in the event were current students Brian Galloway and Natalie Vann, and former UWGB students Billy Wenner, Gena Selby, Donna Bensen, Philip Enderby, Brandon Langer, Nadia Juhnke and Chad Peters. UWGB alumni and art instructors Johanna Winters, Danica Oudeans and Don Kroumpos, and UWGB Arts Management graduate Anne Soderlund, an intern at The Hardy Gallery, also worked with the group.


Photos contributed by Dennis Connolly and Scott Roberts

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UW-Green Bay hosts Phuture Phoenix visits Oct. 13, 15

UW-Green Bay will host its 12th annual Phuture Phoenix Days Tuesday, Oct. 13 and Thursday, Oct. 15, welcoming nearly 1,400 area fifth-graders who will tour campus and explore life as potential college students.

UW-Green Bay’s signature Phuture Phoenix program partners with schools that have high percentages of students from low-income families and encourages students to graduate from high school and pursue a college education.

The program has hosted a total of 17,241 fifth grade students since it began in 2003. To help support the large number of participants, there will be more than 250 UW-Green Bay students serving as role models and group leaders for the day and at least 120 faculty and staff members participating.

This year’s campus visit intends to offer the visiting fifth-graders a varied look at the college experience, introducing them to multiple aspects of campus life. Every fifth-grader and their UWGB mentors will visit a lecture, a residence hall, the Kress Events Center, and enjoy a meal in the Weidner Center or the University Union’s Phoenix Room. Additionally, numerous UW-Green Bay students and faculty members have planned special, large-group activities for students to interact with peers from their own and other participating schools. A few of these activities include exploration of the Cofrin Library archives, interactive improvisational games, a “slime laboratory,” printmaking, and “College 101” presentations touching upon financial aid, admissions, advising and social work.

Phuture Phoenix Day is a coordinated effort to inspire academic success and alert children to educational opportunities available to them. Phuture Phoenix programming helps prepare elementary school students for college early, says Jenny Woldt, a fifth-grade teacher at Jefferson Elementary School and fan of the program.

“You have to start in kindergarten, get it in their brain that they are college bound no matter where they come from, and that they just need to work hard in school and work hard in their community, and they can get there,” Woldt says.

New to the Tuesday field trip this year are expanded opportunities for fifth-graders to explore the Kress Events Center and UW-Green Bay’s Office of Residence Life, getting a feel for fitness and recreational options and on-campus housing.

“The Office of Residence Life is happy to be able to participate in the Phuture Phoenix program, as it’s never too early to introduce the concept of attending college,” says UW-Green Bay Director of Residence Life, Gail Sims-Aubert. “It’s so important that today’s youth understand going to college means they will be a part of a vibrant educational experience both inside and outside the classroom. This program is an outstanding opportunity to provide a sneak peak of life on campus.”

Brent Tavis, Assistant Athletics Director for Events and Operations, agrees, adding,  “The Kress Events Center is very excited to be able to host the Phuture Phoenix participants every year. It’s an excellent experience for the participants and for the Kress. We get to expose kids to a great atmosphere of sports, fitness, and activities that we hope will make their time here at UW-Green Bay more memorable.”

For more information about Phuture Phoenix.



New academic year brings new master’s in Data Science

(Photo above courtesy of UW-Extension)

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay marks the Sept. 2 start of the fall semester and the 2015-16 academic year with the debut of the first online master’s degree in data science ever offered in the UW System.

UW-Green Bay is a partner in the new Master’s of Data Science degree with UW-Extension and five other UW System universities, in Eau Claire, La Crosse, Oshkosh, Stevens Point and Superior. Faculty from each of the participating campuses will teach the online classes.

Officials say the new degree responds to one of America’s fastest growing fields as businesses and organizations seek to harness vast amounts of data — newly available through various technological innovations — to make better, data-driven decisions.

“The exponential growth in data generation, and the need to get hands around this data, has led businesses scrambling for ways to hone their strategies, improve existing processes and bolster innovation in their products and services,” says Gaurav Bansal, associate professor of management, information science and statistics at UW-Green Bay.

Adds Bansal, who will direct the Master’s of Data Science program at UW-Green Bay, “This program harnesses not only the faculty expertise from different UW campuses but also different academic disciplines including Computer Science, Statistics, Information Technology Management, Business Management and Communication. The program has been developed with input from Industry leaders and is closely aligned with the business needs in this area.”

The curriculum will be grounded in computer science, math and statistics, management and communication. Students will learn how to clean, organize, analyze and interpret large and complex data sets using the latest tools and analytical methods. Admission to the program will require a bachelor’s degree and a 3.0 GPA. Aptitude tests such as the GMAT and GRE will not be required.

“Our ability to collect and interpret data is crucial to the success of our business,” says Matt Mueller, senior vice president of finance and chief financial officer for Schreiber Foods of Green Bay, an advocate of the new program. “Decisions that we make — from providing market insights, to developing modern capabilities, to creating efficiencies in our manufacturing environment and everything in between — are data-driven. We employ a number of professionals (in this area), and I see this online master’s degree program in Data Science as another great resource for us.”

Bansal says tuition will compares favorably to competing graduate programs from other institutions. Like other collaborative online University of Wisconsin programs, students will pay the same tuition whether they live in Wisconsin or out-of-state.

The Master of Science in Data Science program is intended for students with a bachelor’s degree in math, statistics, analytics, computer science, or marketing; or three to five years of professional experience as a business intelligence analyst, data analyst, financial analyst, information technology analyst, database administrator, computer programmer, statistician or other related position.

Bansal points also to a report by McKinsey Global Institute that predicts demand for “deep analytical talent” in the United States could be 50 to 60 percent greater than projected supply by 2018. Opportunities have been identified in almost every economic sector: manufacturing, construction, transportation, warehousing, communication, science, health care, computer science, information technology, retail, sales, marketing, finance, insurance, education, government, law enforcement, security and more.

The Master of Science in Data Science joins a growing list of online degree and certificate programs available at UW-Green Bay. Prospective students seeking more information about the Master of Science in Data Science program are encouraged to visit the website, call 1-877-895-3276 or email.