Category: Featured Connections

UW-Green Bay Featured stories


UWGB connections provide heavy lifting for art event

UW-Green Bay art faculty member Professor Christine Style, as well as a number of UWGB alumni, staff and current students, found a unique way to put ink on paper recently — a multi-ton steamroller.

The Steamroller Print event on September 5-6 was part of a multifaceted “Exquisite Corpse” project organized by Hardy Gallery in Ephraim, Wis. with Style’s guidance.

The Village of Ephraim steamroller was used as a giant printing press, rolling over the inked boards to transfer an image onto paper to create six-foot high printed figures. Twenty artists carved woodblocks for the steamroller print event included eight UWGB students and alumni along with other Door County artists.

In addition to guiding the steamroller prints, Style was the project organizer for a the Exquisite Corpse Print Exchange. Style solicited and recruited 28 Wisconsin artists from throughout the state to design and produce an original print edition of either the head, torso, waist or legs section — later to be randomly combined to complete seven 44-inch high full figures that are on display in The Hardy Gallery.

Digital images of the exchange prints were then used by Prof. Style to design and produce interactive flipbooks that are for sale at The Hardy Gallery. “The Exquisite Corpse Head-to-Toe and End-to-End” exhibit continues through October 13 at The Hardy Gallery on the Anderson Dock. One full set of 28 11″ x 15″ original prints are now part of the UWGB Printmaking Collection.

“Exquisite corpse” is an early 20th century parlor game by which images are collectively created with each artist knowing only his or her part and where to meet up with the other parts.

UWGB artists who participated in the event were current students Brian Galloway and Natalie Vann, and former UWGB students Billy Wenner, Gena Selby, Donna Bensen, Philip Enderby, Brandon Langer, Nadia Juhnke and Chad Peters. UWGB alumni and art instructors Johanna Winters, Danica Oudeans and Don Kroumpos, and UWGB Arts Management graduate Anne Soderlund, an intern at The Hardy Gallery, also worked with the group.


Photos contributed by Dennis Connolly and Scott Roberts

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UWGB Habitat: Building community for two decades

As UW-Green Bay celebrates its 50th Anniversary another UWGB entity is also celebrating a milestone — The UWGB Collegiate Chapter of Habitat for Humanity is in its 20th year, and with it, a special Anniversary Celebration Alumni Build is in the works.

On Saturday, October 17, in conjunction with Greater Green Bay Habitat for Humanity, UWGB Habitat alumni will work on two neighboring houses on Chicago Street in Green Bay.

Twenty-four volunteers are sought for four-hour shifts in the morning or afternoon (8 a.m. to noon and 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.) with lunch midday provided by current members of the campus chapter.

The event provides an opportunity to reunite and reminisce, while helping the campus archivist fill in gaps on the history of the organization, and at the same time provide homes for two deserving families in Green Bay.

habitat-roofLooking back… on May 25, 1995, UW-Green Bay was granted campus chapter status by Habitat for Humanity International. In the two decades since, literally hundreds of UW-Green Bay students have contributed to the cause of eliminating homelessness and providing safe, decent affordable housing to deserving families — in Green Bay, throughout the United States, and around the world. For many of those students, their participation in Collegiate Challenge trips was among the most significant and memorable experiences of their college careers.

Over the course of 20 years, UWGB students participated in at least 24 winter, spring or summer break trips throughout the United States and to two foreign countries to build homes for families in need.

Destinations included affiliate hosts in the Northeast (Connecticut) the South (Mississippi, Texas, Louisiana, Florida, Alabama), the South Central U.S. (North and South Carolina, Kentucky, Missouri, Virginia). the Eastern U.S. (Pennsylvania, Connecticut) and the West (New Mexico, Arizona). Teams traveled to South Africa and to the Philippines on international trips and many students contributed Saturday hours to local home-building projects with Greater Green Bay Habitat for Humanity or volunteering at the Habitat ReStore.

habitat-framingHabitat builds are far from vacations. Prior to a build, students must first spend a semester conducting fundraisers to raise money to cover trip costs. Then, over winter or spring break, they travel hundreds of miles by bus or van, stay for a week in very modest housing (typically a church basement or volunteer center), share just a couple of showers/bathrooms, and spend the bulk of their “break” time laboring — framing, roofing, putting up siding, insulating, hanging drywall or painting. They return from their college break more exhausted than when they left. But almost to the last one, they say the experience was incomparable, and the satisfaction of working together to provide a deserving family a home is its own reward. So gratifying was the experience that many students participated in three or four Collegiate Challenge trips during their college years.

Organizers would appreciate securing volunteers by October 2.

Many trips through the years have been documented on the UWGB Habitat for Humanity Facebook page.

Join the event on Facebook.

Feature by Mike Stearney, former Dean of Enrollment Services and longtime Habitat for Humanity Student Adviser


Reception honors student artist Adam Fulwiler

UW-Green Bay student artist Adam Fulwiler was honored for his work, “Windows” a layered, large-scale acrylic painting chosen for display as the Chancellor’s Holiday Art Scholarship selection for 2015-16. Fulwiler was joined by art faculty and others at a reception hosted by Chancellor Gary L. and Georgia Nix Miller, Sept. 24.

Fulwiler, a graduate of West De Pere High School, has a double major in Art and Design Arts and expects to graduate in spring 2017. His painting was selected by Chancellor and Mrs. Miller from a range of student pieces submitted for juried consideration. Fulwiler will receive a monetary award provided through the Holiday Art Scholarship program established by the Millers.

With its selection, “Windows” will be the featured art on the 2015 year-end holiday cards the Millers and the privately funded UW-Green Bay Foundation Inc. will share with campus and community friends of the University. Additionally, the piece will be publicly displayed for one year in the UW-Green Bay Chancellor’s Office, Suite 810 of the David A. Cofrin Library.

Art Prof. Kristy Deetz says Fulwiler “is a diligent worker who sets a standard of excellence in the quality of the work that he produces and in his commitment to growing as an artist.”

In his artist’s statement accompanying “Windows,” Fulwiler describes how his large-scale paintings explore the elements of form including line, shape, value, color and texture. “I build up surfaces by scraping, layering and dragging paint across the entire canvas with the goal of forming visual passages and ‘doorways’ to spaces that often suggest landscapes,” he writes. He uses five-foot-long squeegees, brooms, metal trowels and oversize brushes to create the paintings.

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Photos by Tammy Resulta



UW-Green Bay hosts Phuture Phoenix visits Oct. 13, 15

UW-Green Bay will host its 12th annual Phuture Phoenix Days Tuesday, Oct. 13 and Thursday, Oct. 15, welcoming nearly 1,400 area fifth-graders who will tour campus and explore life as potential college students.

UW-Green Bay’s signature Phuture Phoenix program partners with schools that have high percentages of students from low-income families and encourages students to graduate from high school and pursue a college education.

The program has hosted a total of 17,241 fifth grade students since it began in 2003. To help support the large number of participants, there will be more than 250 UW-Green Bay students serving as role models and group leaders for the day and at least 120 faculty and staff members participating.

This year’s campus visit intends to offer the visiting fifth-graders a varied look at the college experience, introducing them to multiple aspects of campus life. Every fifth-grader and their UWGB mentors will visit a lecture, a residence hall, the Kress Events Center, and enjoy a meal in the Weidner Center or the University Union’s Phoenix Room. Additionally, numerous UW-Green Bay students and faculty members have planned special, large-group activities for students to interact with peers from their own and other participating schools. A few of these activities include exploration of the Cofrin Library archives, interactive improvisational games, a “slime laboratory,” printmaking, and “College 101” presentations touching upon financial aid, admissions, advising and social work.

Phuture Phoenix Day is a coordinated effort to inspire academic success and alert children to educational opportunities available to them. Phuture Phoenix programming helps prepare elementary school students for college early, says Jenny Woldt, a fifth-grade teacher at Jefferson Elementary School and fan of the program.

“You have to start in kindergarten, get it in their brain that they are college bound no matter where they come from, and that they just need to work hard in school and work hard in their community, and they can get there,” Woldt says.

New to the Tuesday field trip this year are expanded opportunities for fifth-graders to explore the Kress Events Center and UW-Green Bay’s Office of Residence Life, getting a feel for fitness and recreational options and on-campus housing.

“The Office of Residence Life is happy to be able to participate in the Phuture Phoenix program, as it’s never too early to introduce the concept of attending college,” says UW-Green Bay Director of Residence Life, Gail Sims-Aubert. “It’s so important that today’s youth understand going to college means they will be a part of a vibrant educational experience both inside and outside the classroom. This program is an outstanding opportunity to provide a sneak peak of life on campus.”

Brent Tavis, Assistant Athletics Director for Events and Operations, agrees, adding,  “The Kress Events Center is very excited to be able to host the Phuture Phoenix participants every year. It’s an excellent experience for the participants and for the Kress. We get to expose kids to a great atmosphere of sports, fitness, and activities that we hope will make their time here at UW-Green Bay more memorable.”

For more information about Phuture Phoenix.



Scholarship receptions: Bringing donors and recipients together

UW-Green Bay Chancellor Chancellor Gary L. and Georgia Nix Miller hosted a series of smaller, more intimate receptions at various venues this fall to give donors, recipients, and others more of an opportunity to engage. Enjoy the photo gallery. Photos by UW-Green Bay graduate Tammy Resulta.

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Joyous reunion: BlueWhale Coffeehouse returning to UWGB

If ever a joyous reunion can be
Let us share what we’ve gained and lost in between
We’ll find that the years, both kindly and cruel
Have failed to put distance between you and me

-Claudia Schmidt

And a joyous reunion it will be on Friday, October 16, 2015, when the friends of the former BlueWhale Coffeehouse gather at the Shorewood Golf Course Clubhouse for the return of Claudia Schmidt, Mark Dvorak, Skip Jones and Randal Harris. The event is in celebration of both Alumni Days and UW-Green Bay’s 50th anniversary celebration.

While the reunion cannot take place in the original Shorewood Club building that housed the BlueWhale Coffeehouse (it was torn down years ago), the concert will take place nearby in what was formerly the Shorewood Annex, directly across the sidewalk from where the former Shorewood Club stood.

And while there won’t be the knotty pine paneling, large stone fireplace, well-worn couches or frost-covered windows that gave the coffeehouse its unique ambiance, the original BlueWhale sign (painted by Mike Tincher and Teresa Bargielski in the late 1970’s) will grace the stage. It was rescued from a dumpster after the Club was torn down, and has been hanging in a barn in Bowler, Wis. for the last 35 years.

The showcase artist of the evening will be Schmidt, one of the premiere performers from the BlueWhale days, now an international performer known for her lively folk, jazz and blues and playful humor.

Schmidt, a student at UWGB for a time, played her 12-string guitar and dulcimer to standing-room-only crowds for many years, and went on to a remarkable career traveling the world as a folk singer and spoken word performer. The master of ceremonies for the evening will be folk singer Jones, a UWGB alumnus and BlueWhale regular. He will be joined by Harrison, a remarkable jazz violinist from Madison and Dvorak, a member of the faculty at the Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago and popular guitar and banjo player who has toured throughout the Midwest and East Coast.

Many alumni have fond memories of Saturday evenings at the BlueWhale — in the 70s and early 80s considered one of the premiere folk music venues in the upper Midwest. Artists from all over the country would come through on tour, playing at Café Extempore in Minneapolis, then at the BlueWhale in Green Bay, and then on to venues in Madison or Chicago.

Some of those acts became folk music icons (Utah Phillips, Bill Staines, Gordon Bok and John McCutcheon all played at the Whale) and many others achieved regional and national acclaim (Greg Brown, Paul Cebar and Jones, among them).

It wasn’t just the music that drew students and community members to the BlueWhale, however. There was something magical about the place in its heyday — the music, the fireplace and the fellowship all flowed together to create a warm and friendly gathering place for a particular crowd of people who shared some common values and interests — the environment, folk music, art and social justice.

As that crowd reunites on Friday October 16, perhaps a few pounds heavier and with a little more gray, maybe a little of that magic can be recreated.

Doors open at 6:15 p.m. for socializing and reminiscing. The public is asked to bring memorabilia from the BlueWhale days (posters, programs, handbills, photos, etc) to share, and perhaps contribute to the UWGB archives. The concert begins at 7:00 p.m. Price of admission is $15 (cash or check only—no credit cards), or free to those purchasing an Alumni Days admissions bracelet (entrance for two for $25) for all Alumni Days activities.


Feature written by Mike Stearney, a former BlueWhale patron and former UWGB Dean of Enrollment Services


Spawning Run to raise funds, awareness for local fisheries conservation

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay student chapter of the American Fisheries Society is hosting its first ever UWGB Spawning Run at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 17. The run will take place on the UW-Green Bay campus along the paths of the Cofrin Arboretum. The race route is 3.1 miles of winding trails through a campus forest (wood-chipped trails, grass and gravel) beginning and ending behind the Kress Events Center.

All proceeds from the run benefit American Fisheries Society student research and local habitat restoration projects. The American Fisheries Society is the world’s oldest and largest organization dedicated to strengthening the fisheries profession, advancing fisheries science and conserving fisheries resources.

Race day registration and packet pickup begins at 8 a.m. near the starting line. Participants will receive a t-shirt with registration and have a chance to participate in a raffle. Awards will be given to the top three finishers. The cost to register is $20 before Oct. 3 and $25 after. Members of the American Fisheries Society as well as UW-Green Bay alumni, students and staff receive a $5 discount.

The Spawning Run is being held in conjunction with the third annual Alumni Days on Oct.16 and 17 on the UW-Green Bay campus. Following the race, participants can join with the community for “Phoenix Fest,” in the green space between the Kress Events Center and the University Union. Phoenix Fest will be held from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with free food, refreshments and live music. Families can enjoy bounce houses, zip lines, ultimate Frisbee, scavenger hunts, athletics events and more.

Registration is being accepted online. Registration forms are available on the UW-Green Bay campus at the University Union and the Alumni Office, or contact organizer Marian Shaffer. General information can be found on their Facebook page.



Commemorating 50 with a city-wide celebration

UW-Green Bay set out to share its 50th Anniversary celebration with the City of Green Bay Wednesday evening, Sept. 2 with a “Turn the Market Green” event at the Broadway District’s Farmers Market. Mission accomplished.

Following a series of events on campus, faculty, staff and students joined UW-Green Bay alumni and friends, city leaders, including Mayor Jim Schmitt and local business to celebrate the strong and growing partnership between UW-Green Bay and the City.

captains-walkTwo downtown businesses — Captain’s Walk Winery (owned by UWGB alumni Brad and Aric Schmiling) and Titletown Brewing — joined in the festivities. The Schmilings presented Chancellor Miller with the first bottle of UW-Green Bay 50th commemorative limited edition Cabernet Sauvignon to be sold at Captain’s Walk.

gb-golden-final-150Brent Weycker, president and founder of Titletown Brewing and Chancellor Miller tapped the first keg of “GB Golden” a beer now on tap and on the menu at Titletown through the fall, with proceeds benefiting UWGB student scholarships.

The crowd was entertained by the band Brass Differential, playing its 50th show and featuring members of the UWGB faculty and UWGB alumni.

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Celebrating the 50th, ’70s style

They were UWGB’s first students — watching the campus grow from corn field to conglomerate — and some even helped move in the furniture that can still be found in remote pockets of campus. They are the UW-Green Bay graduates of the Class of 1970, and they returned to campus recently to celebrate the University’s 50th anniversary with the faculty members who inspired them, and to trade stories about the good ol’ days. In a casual environment at the Shorewood Clubhouse, nearly two dozen alumnimade the return trip. They enjoyed a trip down memory lane via a photo and memorabilia display provided by University Archives. They shared many, many stories from UW-Green Bay’s earliest days and the school’s “Eco U” roots.  Among the treasured memories? The time maintenance workers knocked on the classroom door to install the University’s first blackboards… while class was in session. Being welcomed beyond imagination as returning adult students. Being led by a chancellor (Ed Weidner) who wanted to know them personally.  And, of course the relationships… favorite faculty, mentors and friends.

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That’s a whole lot of green

They came back to the UW-Green Bay campus green from head-to-toe, but the UWGB chalk team members said it was well worth it. They had a ball helping turn the city of Green Bay green following the renaming of Broadway (and Hubbard) to Phoenix Way on Monday, August 31. The activities were part of UW-Green Bay’s 50th Anniversary kick-off. Acknowledging it would take a team of 50 to canvas a town, the group managed to spread Phoenix spirit at about two dozen high traffic locations downtown, and in front of businesses owned or led by UWGB alumni in Brown County. The 50th committee extends thanks to the chalk team, and special thanks to the many businesses that support UW-Green Bay, both with bright green storefront visibility and behind-the-scenes acknowledgement and support.

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