Author Archives: Roosa Turunen '20

Reminder: Please dispose of batteries properly

Instruction for the disposal of different kind of batteries is as follows: Alkaline batteries are composed primarily of common metals — steel, zinc and manganese — and do not pose a health or environmental risk during normal use or disposal. Proven cost-effective and environmentally safe recycling processes are not yet universally available for alkaline batteries. Battery types include AAA, AA, A, C, D and 9 volt. Disposal: May be placed in normal trash for disposal. Do not dispose of large amounts (more than 3 or 4 handfuls) of alkaline batteries in the trash. Contact Jill Fermanich at 2273 or fermanij@uwgb.edu if you have large amounts of alkaline batteries for disposal.

Button batteries still contain small amounts of mercury and should be recycled through the state’s hazardous waste disposal contractor. Disposal: Place button batteries between two layers of clear packing tape. Place in campus mail to Jill Fermanich, Business & Finance. Rechargeable batteries: The most common types of rechargeable batteries are nickel cadmium (Ni-Cd); nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH);and lithium (Li-ion). Disposal: Tape all battery terminals. Contact Jill Fermanich at 2273 or fermanij@uwgb.edu for disposal. Lead acid batteries: These are not regulated as hazardous waste as long as they are recycled. Used lead acid batteries may be returned to vendor where purchased at no cost for recycling. Battery vendors are required to accept the spent batteries when a new battery is purchased. Disposal: Contact Mike VanLanen (vanlanem@uwgb.edu) in Facilities Management for disposal.

For disposal of other batteries or for disposal of any material for which you have questions, please call or email Jill Fermanich at 2273 or fermanij@uwgb.edu.

Faculty note: Professors Helpap, Littig reflect on Senator McCain

Senator John McCain is remembered by many as a hero and a patriot. Assistant Prof. David Helpap (Public and Environmental Affairs) and retired faculty member David Littig, say McCain was a politician who followed a moral compass; a rare attribute in today’s world of politics. “He had that type of legacy and type of legitimate clout, that he could go toe to toe with the president in a way other people could not,” Helpap says. See the interview by Wearegreenbay.com.

August is ‘Make a Will’ month, alumnus Greg Babcock ’03 has some advice

August is “Make a Will” month. Alumnus Greg Babcock ’03 (Political Science), an attorney with Wanezek, Jaekels, Daul & Babcock, S.C., Green Bay, provides expertise and advice on the subject:

Don’t put it off

“I talk to people nearly every week who tell me that they have wanted to get a will and other estate documents completed for a long time, but for whatever reason they have continued to put it off. I explain to these people the risks of dying without a will or becoming incompetent while they are alive without power Unknown-12of attorneys. When they hear what could happen if they don’t have a will or power of attorneys in place, that is usually all the motivation that a person needs to get these documents completed today.”

A basic plan is a great benefit

“Usually most people want and need a basic estate plan with a will and health care/financial power of attorneys. Your will may address issues such as who the beneficiaries of your estate will be, who will administer the estate should you pass away (i.e. the personal representative) and who will be guardian for your children. In your will, you may also provide charitable giving to individuals and/or organizations. This is a great opportunity for people to give back to those people or organizations that had a large impact on their lives. Sometimes people may want or need a revocable or irrevocable trust depending on their circumstances.”

Don’t risk it

“If you die without a will, you risk that your estate will pass to your heirs according to state law.  You might not like that outcome. You also risk that the state will appoint a guardian for your minor children, a person you might not have chosen or wanted as guardian for your children. If you do not have a power of attorney for your health and finances, should you become incompetent, you can not have a person act on your behalf without a court order usually obtained through a guardianship proceeding.  A guardianship proceeding can be time intensive, costly, and you are at the mercy of the court’s decision as to who is appointed your guardian.”