Voyageur Magazine Author Talk Series, Feb. 27

“Voyageur: Northeast Wisconsin’s Historical Review” will be hosting its next Author Talk Series event on Thursday, Feb. 27 at 7 p.m. at the Barnes & Noble in Green Bay, 2498 Oneida St. Author Steve Frozena will give a talk on his article, “The Last Yegg of Pulaski: Eddie Bentz and the Robbery of the Pulaski-Chase Co-Op,” from the Winter/Spring 2020 issue of the magazine, which was released last month. Please join us as we learn more about a fascinating story from Northeast Wisconsin’s past. Voyageur is published by the Brown County Historical Society in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

‘Voyageur’ accepting applications for spring 2020 interns

“Voyageur: Northeast Wisconsin’s Historical Review” is now accepting applications for editorial interns for the Spring 2020 semester. “Voyageur,” a nonprofit magazine dedicated to preserving the history of a 26-county area of greater Northeast Wisconsin, is published by the Brown County Historical Society in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

Editorial interns will help prepare the magazine’s articles, photographs and image captions for publication. The position involves editing, writing and some research, as well as collaboration with the magazine’s graphic design students. The internship will be overseen by the magazine’s editors, Associate Prof. Eric J. Morgan (Democracy and Justice Studies) and Associate Prof. Daniel Kallgren (History).

If you have an interest in history or digital and public humanities, or a desire to work in writing or publishing, consider applying for this unique opportunity. The internship will count as three credits in Humanities, or with approval of the History chair, as an elective credit in History.

To apply, complete this very brief Qualtrics survey by Friday, Nov. 29th. If you have any questions about the internship, please contact Associate Prof. Morgan at morgane@uwgb.edu.

‘Voyageur’ to host Author Talk Series event on Thursday, Sept. 12

Voyageur: Northeast Wisconsin’s Historical Review magazine will host its inaugural Author Talk Series event on Thursday, Sept. 12  at Fifth Ward Brewery in Oshkosh beginning at 7 p.m. Author John Harry will give a talk on his article, “The People’s Brewing Company: African American Entrepreneurship in the Civil Rights Era,” which appears in the special 35th anniversary issue on African Americans in Northeast Wisconsin, currently on sale at local retailers. To learn more about the Author Talk event, please visit Voyageur’s website.

Faculty note: Associate Prof. Eric Morgan appointed new editor-in-chief of ‘Voyageur’

Associate Prof. Eric J. Morgan (Democracy and Justice Studies, History) has been appointed as the new editor-in-chief of Voyageur: Northeast Wisconsin’s Historical Review. Published by the Brown County Historical Society in cooperation with the UW-Green Bay, Voyageur is a non-profit magazine dedicated to exploring the history of a 26-county area of greater northeast Wisconsin and has published two issues per year since its beginning in 1984.  Before his appointment as editor-in-chief, Morgan served as the magazine’s review editor, associate editor and member of the editorial board. Morgan replaces Associate Prof. David Voelker (Humanities, History), who served as editor-in-chief for nearly five years, editing nine issues, from Summer/Fall 2015 through Summer/Fall 2019. Voelker’s final issue as editor is a special 35th-anniversary issue of the magazine, focusing on African Americans in northeast Wisconsin, which will be published in June.

“Voyageur: Northeast Wisconsin’s Historical Review” Winter/Spring 2017 issue features UW-Green Bay talent

The Winter/Spring 2017 issue of Voyageur: Northeast Wisconsin’s Historical Review, hit mailboxes and local newsstands in January. The magazine is published by the Brown County Historical Society, in partnership with UW-Green Bay. This issue includes articles on Hotel Northland, the Automobile Gallery, and the UW-Green Bay time capsule and Viking Saga House. Assistant Prof. Eric Morgan (Democracy and Justice Studies and History) is new to the position of Associate Editor of the magazine and Senior Lecturer Addie Sorbo (Design Arts) was the art director for the issue. Sorbo worked with a class of six graphic designers, and Morgan oversaw five editorial interns. Two students, Lucas Wuensch and Sean Gleason, contributed articles to the magazine. Associate Prof. Heidi Sherman (Humanistic Studies and History) co-authored the Viking Saga House piece with 2016 graduate Natalya Jensen. Associate Prof. David Voelker (Humanistic Studies and History), the magazine’s editor-in-chief, contributed an interview with Automobile Gallery founder William “Red” Lewis. For more information or to subscribe, contact the Voyageur manager, Kent Crain, at 920-465-2446 or voyageur@uwgb.edu.

Voyageur offers special subscription rate to employees, students 


Are you familiar with Voyageur: Northeast Wisconsin’s Historical Review — a magazine about Northeast Wisconsin history that’s created right here on the UW-Green Bay campus? We’ll have a feature on the special partnership behind this publication in a future issue… but right now we’ll take this opportunity to extend a special introductory Voyageur subscription offer to all University of Wisconsin–Green Bay staff and students. For just $20 you can get a two-year subscription (four issues) to Voyageur magazine. That’s a savings of 37.5% over the cover price (after your first two years the annual renewal rate is $15.00). To take advantage of this offer please contact Voyageur’s manager, Kent Crain, at 465-2446. Or stop by the Voyageur office located in Studio Arts 224.

New ‘Voyageur’ issue marks transition from Goff to Voelker

Voyageur: Northeast Wisconsin’s Historical Review, has just published its Summer/Fall 2015 issue. Included are articles on James Doty and early Wisconsin politics; the first documented commercial sawmill in Wisconsin (including discussion of negotiations with the Menominee Nation); the decline of a mission on the Stockbridge-Munsee reservation; a Dutch émigré’s adventures in 19th century Green Bay; and a controversy over a road-building project in New Franken.

The magazine, in its 32nd year, is published cooperatively by the Brown County Historical Society and UWGB. Associate Prof. David Voelker (Humanistic Studies/History) currently edits the magazine, having recently replaced emerita faculty member Victoria Goff, who served as editor for 20 years. The senior art director for this issue was Toni Damkoehler (Art and Design/Design Arts). Several UWGB students were involved in the production as graphic designers and editorial interns, and a number of faculty and staff serve on the Editorial Committee. If you are interested in ordering a copy of the magazine or would like to subscribe, call or email Voyageur‘s manager, Kent Crain, at 920-465-2446 or voyageur@uwgb.edu.
 

Rockwood Lodge story, repeated, with accessible links

The following two stories are repeated from yesterday for the benefit of those who reported back they were unable to access the links provided. The URL links are corrected here.
Does Packers’ proud history include arson? Voyageur helps address mystery

Voyageur magazine, the Northeast Wisconsin historical review, was co-founded on campus, has offices here and relies greatly on UW-Green Bay talent. (Editor Victoria Goff and art directors Jeff Benzow and Toni Damkoehler are faculty members, and numerous student interns contribute to the publication, as well.) That’s why it’s especially exciting that ESPN The Magazine has picked up on a Voyageur story involving a key turning point in Green Bay Packers history. The local story by Cliff Christl and Ellyn Katch Kehoe revisited the 1950 fire that destroyed Rockwood Lodge — the team’s former training site and headquarters overlooking the bay near Dyckesville —and greased the skids for Curly Lambeau’s departure as head coach. The ESPN story, headlined “Blaze of Glory,” revisits the mystery but comes down firmly on the side of those who suspect the fire was intentional, meant to collect $50,000 in insurance money, cover the team’s debt and keep its place in the NFL. Kent Crain, manager of Voyageur, was the liaison to ESPN reporter Dave Fleming, who did additional research and interviewed subjects suggested by Crain. “It was exciting for Voyageur,” Crain says, “to the extent that we had helped him in a small manner and that the magazine was mentioned in a national publication.” Now the site of Bayshore County Park, the former Rockwood Lodge was a magnificent structure but a “total disaster” as a Green Bay Packers training site. The thin soil over the limestone bedrock contributed to a wave of injuries, and expenses associated with the facility were bleeding the franchise dry. You can read more in the ESPN The Magazine piece. An additional piece on Rockwood is here.

Does Packers’ proud history include arson? Voyageur helps address mystery


Voyageur magazine, the Northeast Wisconsin historical review, was co-founded on campus, has offices here and relies greatly on UW-Green Bay talent. (Editor Victoria Goff and art directors Jeff Benzow and Toni Damkoehler are faculty members, and numerous student interns contribute to the publication, as well.) That’s why it’s especially exciting that ESPN The Magazine has picked up on a Voyageur story involving a key turning point in Green Bay Packers history. The local story by Cliff Christl and Ellyn Katch Kehoe revisited the 1950 fire that destroyed Rockwood Lodge — the team’s former training site and headquarters overlooking the bay near Dyckesville —and greased the skids for Curly Lambeau’s departure as head coach. The ESPN story, headlined “Blaze of Glory,” revisits the mystery but comes down firmly on the side of those who suspect the fire was intentional, meant to collect $50,000 in insurance money, cover the team’s debt and keep its place in the NFL. Kent Crain, manager of Voyageur, was the liaison to ESPN reporter Dave Fleming, who did additional research and interviewed subjects suggested by Crain. “It was exciting for Voyageur,” Crain says, “to the extent that we had helped him in a small manner and that the magazine was mentioned in a national publication.” You can read more in the ESPN The Magazine piece. An additional piece on Rockwood is here.