Applications for UW System Symposium close on Feb. 21

The Office of Grants & Research and the Office of the Provost encourages you to advertise the following opportunity to your students and their faculty mentors! The 19th Annual UW System Symposium for Undergraduate Research, Scholarly and Creative Activity will take place Friday, April 24, 2020 at UW-Whitewater. The Office of Grants and Research will be providing transportation for this event and covering the registration fee for selected participants.

The final application deadline is 4:30 p.m., Friday, Feb. 21, 2020. Applicants must complete the Qualitrics survey in order to be considered as a presenter for this event. Please help us demonstrate the exceptional quality of research conducted by all UW- Green Bay campuses by encouraging your students to apply for this once-in-a-lifetime experience. To apply via Qualtrics survey, please follow the link. For more information about this event please visit https://www.uwgb.edu/research/uw-system-symposium/.

UW-Green Bay student and former professor publish article

Current UW-Green Bay undergraduate Rosalyn Stoa (Psychology and Business Administration) and former UW-Green Bay Prof. Regan Gurung (Psychology) recently published an article in Teaching of Psychology titled, “A National Survey of Teaching and Learning Research Methods: Important Concepts and Faculty and Student Perspectives.” This study investigated both instructor course design and student attitudes and knowledge of the course across the nation. For Stoa, this is her second peer-reviewed published article as a UW-Green Bay undergraduate student.

Abstract: In this study, we assessed instructor and student attitudes and knowledge toward research methods (RM). Instructors (N = 62) answered questions about course format, topic importance and resources. Students (N = 166) of some of those instructors answered questions regarding attitudes toward research. Five major factors organize topics that instructors find most important. Only ratings of statistics importance varied by rank. Associate and full professors rated statistics as being more important than other instructors. There were significant relationships between attitudes toward and knowledge of RM together with the higher perceived utility of some course components. Requiring students to conduct their own research was not a significant predictor of attitudes or RM knowledge.