Is college really worth it? Study shows most of America believes so

We know the cost of tuition, books, and housing is worth it. The majority of Americans believe so, as well. Seven in 10 seniors graduate with debt, owing about $29,650 per borrower. Still, 90 percent of parents and students say college is worth the investment, according to Sallie Mae. Almost 80 percent of Americans think that a college degree is more valuable today than it was in the past. Read the full story at CNBC.

Regents to consider more out-of-staters at UW-Madison


In a proposed move that could ultimately affect applications and enrollment at other UW System institutions (because Madison’s ripples are felt statewide), the UW’s flagship campus will this week ask UW Regents for permission to lift the school’s cap on out-of-state students. UW-Madison Chancellor Rebecca Blank says the move could attract more young people to Wisconsin and boost tuition revenue in the wake of deep budget cuts. Currently, out-of-state undergraduate enrollment at Madison can’t exceed 27.5 percent of total undergraduate enrollment. See news coverage.

UWGB gets ‘best bang for the buck’ mention in Washington Monthly

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay was recently ranked No. 19 in the “Best Bang for the Buck Colleges in the Midwest” category of the 2015 Washington Monthly College Rankings. The rankings were officially released Monday, August 24, 2015 and rates universities on students’ social mobility, civic engagement and research. Founded in 1969, Washington Monthly is a bimonthly nonprofit magazine covering politics, government, culture and the media. The chart that accompanies the guide depicts the schools in the Midwest are the best value based on “net” (not sticker) price, success of a school based on graduating the students admitted, and whether those students go on to earn at least enough to pay off their loans.

UW-Green Bay named ‘best bang for the buck’ in Washington Monthly

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay was recently ranked No. 19 in the “Best Bang for the Buck Colleges in the Midwest” category of the 2015 Washington Monthly College Rankings. The rankings were officially released Monday, August 24, 2015 and rates universities on students’ social mobility, civic engagement and research. Founded in 1969, Washington Monthly is a bimonthly nonprofit magazine covering politics, government, culture and the media. The chart that accompanies the guide depicts those schools in the Midwest that are the best value based on “net” (not sticker) price, success of a school based on graduating the students admitted, and whether those students go on to earn at least enough to pay off their loans.

Regents OK increases in out-of-state, graduate tuitions for some schools


The UW System Board of Regents voted Friday to approve tuition increases for some students at UW-Madison as well as at La Crosse, Milwaukee, Parkside, Platteville, River Falls, Stevens Point, Stout and Whitewater. The increases would affect out-of-state undergraduates and graduate students in select programs. Read more.

Proposal for targeted tuition hikes at UW-Madison draws questions

Two UW-Madison experts on higher education affordability said Wednesday that a plan to increase nonresident undergraduate tuition by $10,000 over the next four years at the state’s flagship campus likely would reduce the number of lower- and middle-class students from other states and raise the stakes for attracting wealthy students. Sara Goldrick-Rab and Noel Radomski say their research points to significant risks.

Some UW schools seek higher tuition on grad students, out-of-staters


The UW System Board of Regents will be asked this week to allow nine schools to raise tuition rates for graduate and non-resident students in response to plans to cut as much as $300 million in funding from the statewide budget. The requests for tuition hikes come from Madison, La Crosse, Milwaukee, Parkside, Platteville, River Falls, Stevens Point, Stout and Whitewater. Madison is proposing a four-year plan that would raise non-resident undergraduate tuition by $10,000, while international students would see an $11,000 increase. Other campuses are asking for tuition hikes of several hundred dollars, which would take effect during the next school year. The Press-Gazette has coverage.

UW-Green Bay will hold the line, for now

Missing from the statewide conversation about tuition increases for graduate programs and non-resident students? UW-Green Bay, along with its sister four-year schools in Eau Claire, Oshkosh and Superior. UW-Green Bay officials tell the Log there are several reasons tuition increases are not being requested here at this time. They note a desire to hold the line until market research and other data indicate an increase would be acceptable and advisable. Also limiting the revenue potential are the relatively modest scope of graduate programs here and the overall out-of-state enrollment. Another limiting factor is the requirement to offer discounted tuition under the Midwest Compact and similar agreements that account for most non-Wisconsin enrollments.

Cross: Tuition freeze likely to continue beyond 2014-15

UW System-wide tuition freezes could continue in the coming years, System President Ray Cross said Wednesday (June 4), telling the Wisconsin State Journal he favors extending the freeze beyond its current expiration date after 2014-15 school year. “I really think we’re going to embrace that tuition freeze for two more years,” Cross is quoted as saying. “We’re generally in favor, assuming we can work through with the governor and the Legislature some of the other issues to help us address our finances.” System spokesman John Diamond added that tuition is now considered “a revenue source of last resort,” the story says. Cross reiterated his call for the freeze during Thursday’s Regents meeting. You can check out the State Journal story, here.