Faculty note: Prof. Merkel extends reach with Tiny Earth and STEM programs this summer

UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Brian Merkel is co-chairing the summer Tiny Earth symposium this year and will present a TAPAS talk on a high-impact community project with Green Bay West High School’s, Serious About STEM program. The Serious About Stem program and UW-Green Bay’s College of Science, Engineering and Technology, are forming a partnership to educate at-risk female high school students in the Tiny Earth curriculum.

The plan is to run a skill-development camp for two weeks on campus this August to prepare them to conduct Tiny Earth research over 14 weeks at UW-Green Bay this fall. These students will then present their findings at the Tiny Earth winter symposium at the Lambeau Field Atrium in December of 2021. Additionally, two UW-Green Bay Human Biology alumni, Halee Behrens and Roman Lyudmer are panelists for a session on “Leveraging Your Tiny Earth Experience.” Lyudmer has been accepted to a M.S program in Immunology at Drexel. Halee recently completed her first year in Concordia’s PA program.

UW-Green Bay Students Searching Soil For The Next Antibiotics | Wisconsin Public Radio

This week students at UW-Green Bay join others around the country and around the world, sharing results of studying soil in a common course they’ve all been taking, looking at developing new antibiotics for the public.

Source: UW-Green Bay Students Searching Soil For The Next Antibiotics | Wisconsin Public Radio

Reminder: You are welcome to attend the Tiny Earth Winter Symposium

In addition to celebrating the research efforts of students around the world including our own UW-Green Bay students, this year’s Tiny Earth Winter Symposium, Dec. 14-15 via ZOOM is focused on public health emergencies and the inequities associated with them. A panel of experts will convene on the second day of the symposium (December 15) to discuss public health emergencies and solutions to address them. The inequities of public health, as well as scientific literacy, will be featured topics.  Symposium participants will then have an opportunity to engage in a discussion around actions we can take in our communities to spread awareness of the challenges and solutions to address them. This is timely for many reasons, including the inclusivity efforts taking place on our own campus, as well as the management of the safety issues related to COVID-19 on our campus and in our community. Chancellor Alexander was chosen by the steering committee to provide the welcome on December 15 in recognition of his contributions in these areas. The Symposium is a great opportunity to showcase the value of partnerships to mitigating large problems to a wide audience. Tiny Earth represents the realm of what is possible when innovative partnerships emerge for the greater good.  The symposium wholly reflects the value of collaboration for this purpose. You are invited to join. Registration is free for students and the community.

Dirt Path: UW-Green Bay’s Tiny Earth Program May Be Key in Helping Solve Antibiotic Crisis

Next week’s Tiny Earth event has been gathering statewide publicity. “There is something, too, about being part of something that is so much larger than yourself for these students, and they get it,’’ said co-director of the international event, UW-Green Bay Prof. Brian Merkel. “In my experience, they find it incredibly inspiring that they know they are doing something highly relevant, highly important and, moreover, the fact they are part of a team, an international team; it’s really awe-inspiring to them.”

Source: Dirt Path: UW-Green Bay’s Tiny Earth Program May Be Key in Helping Solve Antibiotic Crisis, Spectrum News 1

Tiny Earth Symposium Searches for New Antibiotics

“It’s a great opportunity to showcase the value of partnerships to mitigating large problems to a wide audience. For my part, Tiny Earth represents the realm of what is possible when innovative partnerships emerge for the greater good. The symposium wholly reflects the value of collaboration for this purpose.” said Prof. Brian Merkel (Biology). Source: Tiny Earth Symposium Searches for New Antibiotics, Green Bay News Network

UW-Green Bay students take a closer look at public health emergencies

UW-Green Bay students are showcasing research presentations that focus on antibiotic resistance and public health emergencies. This year’s winter symposium will be held virtually on Dec. 14 and 15. UW-Green Bay Prof. Brian Merkel joined Good Day Wisconsin to talk about the event and how it factors into the coronavirus pandemic.

UW-Green Bay students helping in worldwide effort to develop new antibiotics

GREEN BAY, Wis. (WFRV) College students at UW-Green Bay are helping in a worldwide effort to develop new life-saving antibiotics. As Kris Schuller reports the Tiny Earth project is out to help solve a growing crisis. For the past 14 weeks college students at UWGB like Carolyn LaTour – have been looking through soil samples searching for bacteria which hopefully one day leads to new antibiotics.

“Discovering new and different antibiotics will definitely help the medical field a lot,” said LaTour.

LaTour and her classmates are participating in the Tiny Earth program. It’s an international effort involving 10,000 students from 300 colleges – all aimed at discovering new antibiotics by searching the ground under our feet.

“There are infections caused by bacteria from which nothing on the shelf works anymore,” said LaTour’s professor, Brian Merkel.

The students collected soil samples from a variety of spots; compost piles, at their family home and in LaTour’s case. More from Merkel at WFRV-TV.

2020 Tiny Earth Winter Symposium is Dec. 14-15; Register by Dec. 7

In addition to celebrating the research efforts of students around the world including our own UW-Green Bay students, this year’s Tiny Earth Symposium is focused on public health emergencies and the inequities associated with them. A panel of experts will convene on the second day of the symposium (Dec. 15) to discuss public health emergencies and solutions to address them. Symposium participants will then have an opportunity to engage in a discussion around actions we can take in our communities to spread awareness of the challenges and solutions to address them. This is timely for many reasons, including the inclusivity efforts taking place on our own campus, as well as the management of the safety issues related to COVID-19 on our campus and in our community. Registration is free for students and the community. Find more details and register for the event by Dec. 7

Video: Tiny Earth at Lambeau Field is about scientific discovery

Students from UW-Green Bay and across the state came together on Friday, Dec. 6, 2019 at Lambeau Field to give presentations about their findings regarding antibiotic resistance (see it happening via twitter). The hope is, that through the scientific research by students from across the world, new sources of antibiotics will be discovered. In September, the Green Bay Packers provided a soil sample from their practice field for UW-Green Bay students to analyze as part of their research.

Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.
Tiny Earth at Lambeau Field 2019

Photos by Sue Pischke, Marketing and University Communication