Video: Tiny Earth at Lambeau Field is about scientific discovery

Students from UW-Green Bay and across the state came together on Friday, Dec. 6, 2019 at Lambeau Field to give presentations about their findings regarding antibiotic resistance (see it happening via twitter). The hope is, that through the scientific research by students from across the world, new sources of antibiotics will be discovered. In September, the Green Bay Packers provided a soil sample from their practice field for UW-Green Bay students to analyze as part of their research.

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Tiny Earth at Lambeau Field 2019

Photos by Sue Pischke, Marketing and University Communication

Reminder: Tiny Earth in Titletown, Dec. 6

On Friday, Dec. 6, 2019, students from across the state, including UW-Green Bay, will present their research findings about antibiotic resistance at the Tiny Earth Symposium at Lambeau Field from 5 to 8 p.m. The keynote speaker, Director of the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery (WID) and founder of Tiny Earth, Jo Handelsman, will discuss the related crisis of soil erosion. MCW-Green Bay and area businesses, including Cherney microbiological, will be participating in the event as well.

Tiny Earth inspires and retains students in the sciences while addressing one of the most pressing global health challenges of our century, being the diminishing supply of effective antibiotics. This year’s event will feature research of soil provided by the Green Bay Packers practice field in September that was analyzed by UW-Green Bay students, with their findings being presented on Dec. 6.

Registration is free and includes a free tour of Lambeau Field and hors d’oeuvres

All are welcome, but please register.

You’re invited: Tiny Earth in Titletown, Dec. 6

Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health, food security, and development today. Tiny Earth is a global network of educators who teach a research course aimed at discovering new antibiotics. The course provides students with the opportunity for original thinking and scientific discovery, thereby capturing the very aspects of science that inspire students to pursue STEM careers. Students are inspired not just by the chance to do authentic research, but to be a part of a global effort addressing a looming public health crisis.

On Friday, Dec. 6, 2019, students from across the state, including UW-Green Bay, will present their research findings about antibiotic resistance at the Tiny Earth Symposium at Lambeau Field from 5 to 8 p.m. The keynote speaker, Director of the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery (WID) and founder of Tiny Earth, Jo Handelsman, will discuss the related crisis of soil erosion. MCW-Green Bay and area businesses, including Cherney microbiological, will be participating in the event as well.

Tiny Earth inspires and retains students in the sciences while addressing one of the most pressing global health challenges of our century, being the diminishing supply of effective antibiotics. This year’s event will feature research of soil provided by the Green Bay Packers practice field in September that was analyzed by UW-Green Bay students, with their findings being presented on Dec. 6.

Registration is free and includes a free tour of Lambeau Field and hors d’oeuvres

All are welcome, but please register.

UW-Green Bay students to study soil from Packers’ practice fields | Green Bay Press-Gazette

“The next big thing to emerge from the Green Bay Packers’ practice fields might not be a player. It could be life-saving bacteria instead. A team of student researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and area high schools will examine a soil sample from the field as part of the Tiny Earth project, which aims to identify bacteria in the earth strong enough to beat diseases that have become resistant to antibiotics.” More information via Soil from Packers’ practice fields could hold the secret to saving lives. Here’s how.

Packers’ practice field soil could help students find solutions to drug-resistant diseases | The Daily Cardinal

The Tiny Earth project—a network of instructors and students from UW-Green Bay and local high schools—works to identify bacteria in the ground that can cure antibiotic-resistant diseases. The Packers donated a soil sample from one of their practice fields for the project. See more via Packers’ practice field soil could help UW-Green Bay students find solutions to drug-resistant diseases | The Daily Cardinal.

Tiny Earth Kickoff Event

Photos: Tiny Earth kicks-off with soil from the Green Bay Packers

The next big win emerging from the Green Bay Packers’ practice fields could be life-saving bacteria. Student and faculty researchers from UW-Green Bay and area high schools will examine a soil sample from the Packers’ Clark Hinkle Field as part of the Tiny Earth project, which aims to identify bacteria in the earth strong enough to beat diseases that have become resistant to antibiotics.

According to UW-Green Bay Biology Professor Brian Merkel, about 70 percent of the antibiotics used today come from soil bacteria. But the discovery of new ones have drastically slowed. And a 2013 analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that at least two-million people contract an antibiotic-resistant infection each year.

After analyzing soil samples, including the one from the Packers’ Ray Nitschke, students and faculty will gather at the The Tiny Earth Symposium, held at the Lambeau Field Atrium, Dec. 6, 2019, to showcase their findings. At the same time, 10,000 students from across the globe are doing similar research, hoping for the next big discovery.

Merkel calls this a “student-sourcing” event. The larger the group of students, the more reasonable it is to expect a greater frequency of discoveries, he said. The kick-off event took place on Monday, Sept. 9, 2019 at Brown County’s STEM Innovation Center on the UW-Green Bay campus, with representation from UW-Green Bay, the Green Bay Packers and Tiny Earth.

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Tiny Earth Kickoff

Photos by Dan Moore, Office of Marketing and University Communication

Packers provide field soil to ‘Tiny Earth’ UW-Green Bay/global research project

The Green Bay Packers partnered with UW-Green Bay as part of a global research project looking to fight against the rise of drug-resistant diseases. Tiny Earth is an initiative using a global network of college students to identify new life-saving antibiotics produced by bacteria in soil.

“Soil is a very rich trove of places where microbes live, bacteria live, and in particular bacteria and other organisms that produce antibiotics,” said Sarah Miller, executive director of Tiny Earth. This year the Green Bay Packers offered up some soil from its practice field to be used in Tiny Earth’s research with students at UWGB.

via Packers provide field soil to ‘Tiny Earth’ UWGB global research project, WBAY.

UW-Green Bay, Packers support students seeking solutions to drug-resistant bacteria

The next medical breakthrough in drug-resistant diseases could be coming from college students. “There’s a real need,” said UW-Green Bay Professor Brian Merkel (biology). “This is only going to intensify, this pressure to find new antibiotics because, quite simply, there’s infections for which nothing on the shelf works anymore.” The race is on for the Tiny Earth initiative—which uses a network of college students from 15 countries and 45 states to find new life-saving antibiotics. The local Tiny Earth kick-off event was held yesterday at the STEM Innovation Center. See more via UWGB, Packers support students seeking solutions to drug-resistant bacteria, wearegreenbay.com.