Summer Research Scholar Program deadline extended to Feb. 28

The UW-Green Bay Research Council is currently accepting proposals for the 2020 Summer Research Scholar Program. Faculty having applied for the Summer Research Scholar Program in the past will want to note that this program has undergone significant changes in recent years. The Summer Research Scholar Program is designed to provide stipend support during the summer for the purpose for developing or continuing a significant research project (beyond the unit expectations for scholarship). All Summer Research Scholar Program proposals are due by 11:59 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020. For more information, please visit https://www.uwgb.edu/research-council/. Please contact Research Council Chairperson Jason Cowell (cowellj@uwgb.edu) with questions.

Reminder: Summer Research Scholar Program proposals are due Jan. 27

The UW-Green Bay Research Council is currently accepting proposals for the 2020 Summer Research Scholar Program. Faculty having applied for the Summer Research Scholar Program in the past will want to note that this program has undergone significant changes in recent years. The Summer Research Scholar Program is designed to provide stipend support during the summer for the purpose of developing or continuing a significant research project (beyond the unit expectations for scholarship). All Summer Research Scholar Program proposals are due by 11:59 p.m. on Jan. 27, 2020. For more information, please visit https://www.uwgb.edu/research-council/. Contact Research Council Chairperson Jason Cowell at cowellj@uwgb.edu with questions.

Summer Research Scholar Program proposals are due Jan. 27

The UW-Green Bay Research Council is currently accepting proposals for the 2020 Summer Research Scholar Program. Faculty having applied for the Summer Research Scholar Program in the past will want to note that this program has undergone significant changes in recent years. The Summer Research Scholar Program is designed to provide stipend support during the summer for the purpose of developing or continuing a significant research project (beyond the unit expectations for scholarship). All Summer Research Scholar Program proposals are due by 11:59 p.m. on Jan. 27, 2020. For more information, please visit https://www.uwgb.edu/research-council/. Contact Research Council Chairperson Jason Cowell at cowellj@uwgb.edu with questions.

Reminder: Research Council now accepting Summer 2019 Research Scholar proposals

The UW-Green Bay Research Council is currently accepting proposals for Summer 2019 Research Scholars. The Research Council invites full time or tenure-track faculty at all four campuses to submit proposals for the Research Scholar Program. The Research Scholar Program is designed to provide stipend support during the summer for the purpose of developing or continuing a significant research project. All Research Scholar proposals are due by 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019. Learn more. Please contact Research Council Chairperson Brian Welsch at welschb@uwgb.edu with questions.

Reminder: Call for Grants deadline is March 21

The Research Council announces that calls are open for the Grants in Aid of Research and the Research Scholar Program in the Spring 2016 semester. For both grants, the deadline of the proposal is Monday, March 21. For GAIR, proposals may include requests for up to $900 and the funds must be used in support of faculty research. While all proposals will be considered, preference will be given to tenure track faculty and those individuals who have not received funding recently. The Research Scholar program provides a three-credit course release, and is open to all full-time tenured or tenure-track faculty members. More information about the calls is available at: http://www.uwgb.edu/rc/

Weinschenk publishes A Citizens Guide to US Elections

Political scientist Aaron Weinschenk, UW-Green Bay assistant professor of Public and Environmental Affairs, is the co-author of a text newly released this week by Routledge.

The book, A Citizens Guide to US Elections: Empowering Democracy in America, is intended for use in undergraduate political science courses as well as readership by a general audience.

Weinschenk and his co-author, Prof. Costas Panagopoulos of Fordham University, make the case that although there may be widespread dissatisfaction with politics and the electoral process, the system isn’t actually broken. Instead, they write, Americans already have the power to fix what’s wrong within the existing system, provided they roll up their sleeves and get involved; what’s missing today is consistent and meaningful citizen participation.

Weinschenk, a 2007 summa cum laude graduate of UW-Green Bay, joined the faculty in 2013 after earning his Ph.D. in political science from UW-Milwaukee. His scholarship on voting behavior, campaigns and elections, mayoral politics, public opinion, declining turnout, and political psychology has been published in leading journals. The UWGB Research Council presented him the Research Scholar Award in fall 2014 to help complete work on A Citizens Guide.

For more on the book, go to https://www.routledge.com/products/978113885879

Book draws notice from prominent insiders — The book A Citizens Guide to US Elections: Empowering Democracy in America, co-authored by UW-Green Bay faculty member Aaron Weinschenk, debuts this week with positive reviews from two well-connected political analysts.

Nationally prominent consultant Robert Shrum, who was a senior adviser to the Gore 200 and Kerry 2004 presidential campaigns and now holds a named chair in political science at USC, and political handicapper and National Journal columnist Charlie Cook offer reviews posted to the Routledge website. Cook describes the book as “jam-packed with crucial information about contemporary politics and elections” and “required reading for serious students and citizens who want to understand the electoral process and back up their opinions with facts.” Writes Shrum, “It’s enlightening, a great read for political junkies, and a good one for any citizen who cares about democracy and each individual’s capacity and responsibility to make a difference.” See https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138858794

 

Council invites applicants for Research Scholar position

The UW-Green Bay Research Council announces the following fall-semester Research Scholar funding opportunity:

Research Scholar Program (Applications due Nov. 3) — Support from the Office of the Provost continues to make possible this program, which provides a three-credit course release for the Fall 2015 semester. The Research Scholar will be able to use the time afforded by the release to advance his or her scholarship. The program is open to all full-time tenured or tenure-track faculty members at UW-Green Bay. The Scholar will be expected to work on a specific research project and generate a tangible product during the semester of work (e.g., a grant proposal, draft of a manuscript, book proposal, or preparation of creative works for exhibition/performance/publication). Time may be used to develop a new project (e.g., a grant proposal), to complete an existing project (e.g., the final chapters of a book), or to complete a distinct stage of a larger ongoing project. www.uwgb.edu/rc/research-scholar.asp

Additional grant funding is available from the Research Council

Would you like to see your name on the list of Research Council awardees? There is another opportunity for this semester. The Research Council is currently accepting proposals for:

Grants in Aid of Research http://www.uwgb.edu/rc/giar.asp
Grants for Integrating Research & Teaching http://www.uwgb.edu/rc/girt.asp
Research Scholar http://www.uwgb.edu/rc/research-scholar.asp

All proposals are due by 4 p.m. Monday, March 24. Please contact Research Council chairperson Scott Ashmann ashmanns@uwgb.edu or the Office of Grants and Research (Lidia Nonn nonnl@uwgb.edu or Charmaine Robaidek robaidec@uwgb.edu) with questions.

Grants in Aid of Research, and Research Scholar deadlines are announced

The UW-Green Bay Research Council announces two fall-semester funding opportunities. Information and deadlines are as follows:
Grants in Aid of Research (Applications due October 21, 2013.) Grants up to $1,000 (see guidelines for details) must be used in support of faculty research. The number of applications received and the amount of funding available for distribution will determine the number of awards that can be made. While all proposals will be considered, preference will be given to tenure track faculty and those individuals who have not received funding recently. Guidelines and forms
Research Scholar Program (Applications due November 4, 2013.) Support from the Office of the Provost continues to make possible this program which provides a three-credit course release for the Fall 2014 semester. The Research Scholar will be able to use the time afforded by the release to advance his or her scholarship. The program is open to all full-time tenured or tenure-track faculty members at UW-Green Bay. The Scholar will be expected to work on a specific research project and generate a tangible product during the semester of work (e.g., a grant proposal, draft of a manuscript, book proposal, or preparation of creative works for exhibition/performance/publication). Time may be used to develop a new project (e.g., a grant proposal), to complete an existing project (e.g., the final chapters of a book), or to complete a distinct stage of a larger ongoing project. More.

Historian Voelker receives Research Scholar honors

David Voelker, associate professor of Humanistic Studies and History, is the newest recipient of the Research Scholar award presented by the Office of the Provost and the institutional Research Council. Voelker will receive a three-credit course release for spring 2014, affording him time to advance his scholarship and further research resulting in “Debating American History: An Argument-Based Textbook Alternative.” His publication will propose a modular textbook alternative for U.S. history instructors who want to teach an argument-based introductory course. In place of a history textbook that “covers” a given period of history with a relatively straightforward narrative, the text will offer a selection of 25 modular units. Each module will include a carefully chosen array of historical arguments, documents and reference materials, through which students will explore major historical debates in depth. The project concept is based upon both historical and pedagogical research that Voelker has carried out over the past several years.