Hometown paper celebrates success of student, Regional Center for Math/Science

The Regional Center for Math and Science is a TRIO Upward Bound program that serves low-income, first-generation high school students from all over Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota. Students live on campus for six weeks each summer, taking classes, eating in the dining halls, and living in Roy Downham Hall — getting the true college experience.  Adviser Myra Gilreath of RCMS shares a news clip about one of their second-year students (a senior), Miranda Stark, recently recognized in her local paper for her hard work in our program. “She’s an outstanding young woman, both academically and personally,” Gilreath says, “and we’re very proud to see that she’s being recognized in her home community as well as within our program.” Read the article for Miranda’s thoughts on RCMS and college and career plans. 
If you’d like to know more about RCMS, visit www.uwgb.edu/rcms, like them on Facebook at RCMS at UW-Green Bay, or e-mail rcms@uwgb.edu. You can also stop by their offices in Student Services 1721.

Blankets, weeds and wolves: TRiO students give back to community

Teenagers enrolled in TRiO programs at UW-Green Bay begin and end their summers with community-service projects. On June 30, 41 Upward Bound students headed to the Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary for a day of removing invasive species, primarily garlic mustard, which chokes out native species. When they finished pulling and bagging the plants, they had pulled 2,200 pounds of the nasty weeds. Now that’s a whole lot of weeds! (They also cleaned out the wolf compound.) On July 31, 68 students — including 21 eighth-grade bridge students — will return for another morning of community service. Upward Bound has partnered with the sanctuary through the “Adopt a Park Program” for the last five years. Meanwhile, students in the Regional Camp for Math and Science recently finished making 12 blankets, which they plan to donate to area homeless and women’s shelters. The folks in TRiO are proud of these young people’s efforts; they hope you are, too. See more.
 

TRiO camps in full swing

Functioning under a TRiO grant from the U.S. Department of Education, UW-Green Bay has partnered for many years to host Upward Bound and the Regional Center for Math and Science. Over the summer, a staff of two dozen instructors, faculty members, counselors, residence hall assistants, graduate students and administrative staff work with select high school participants over a 6-week period from June 29 to Aug. 9. RCMS students are selected from 20 schools located in Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin, while UB students are chosen from East, West and Preble high schools in Green Bay. Both programs target low-income first generation potential college students.

The main goal is to recruit academically focused high school students from the target population, and then help to prepare them to successfully enter and complete college. An additional goal for RCMS is to increase the math and science skills of high school students in order to prepare them for a university program of study in the sciences, mathematics or engineering. There’s more to college life than classes and studying, of course, so the visiting high schoolers also go on field trips and attend local events.

You can see the academics and the fun events, along with the kids and the support staff, by checking out the images playing on the monitor in front of the TRiO and Precollege office (across and slightly down the hall from the Dean of Students office in the Student Services Building). “Come see what TRiO at UWGB is all about!”

Vision researcher Carroll, Class of ’97, will deliver commencement address

JoeCarroll-webThe commencement address at UW-Green Bay’s spring 2014 graduation ceremony on Saturday, May 17 will be delivered by a distinguished UW-Green Bay graduate whose career as an ophthalmology researcher and university professor has resulted in widespread attention for his pioneering work in the study of the human eye at a cellular level.

Dr. Joseph J. Carroll, Ph.D., is an associate professor of ophthalmology, biophysics, cell biology, neurobiology and anatomy at the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. He also serves as adjunct associate professor in the department of Biomedical Engineering at Marquette University.

He is a 1997 graduate of UW-Green Bay’s undergraduate program in Human Biology.

Carroll co-directs the Medical College of Wisconsin’s Advanced Ocular Imaging Program. He achieved a prestigious career milestone earlier this year with his appointment as the college’s Richard O. Schultz, MD/Ruth Works Professor in Ophthalmology. He was among the first to use a technology called adaptive optics to view the living retina at a cellular level, and he was credited with important breakthroughs in the study of color blindness. He is a specialist in retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosis. His work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Vision for Tomorrow Foundation and other organizations, and he is the author of more than 60 peer-reviewed publications.

Carroll’s achievements in the medical sciences have brought community recognition, as well. He was identified as a rising leader by Milwaukee Business Journal with his selection to this spring’s “40 Under 40” list.

A native of Shawano County, Carroll is a graduate of Tigerton High School. He was prodded by science teacher Gary Kuchenbecker, a 1970 UW-Green Bay grad, to apply himself and pursue an aptitude for science. Carroll was persuaded to participate in a six-week pre-college summer program at UW-Green Bay known as RCMS — the Regional Center for Math and Science, for students from rural areas or disadvantaged backgrounds — and he enjoyed it so much he made the decision to attend college and enroll at UW-Green Bay.

Believed to be the first “graduate” of the RCMS summer program to obtain a Ph.D., Carroll remains an advocate and has returned to UW-Green Bay several times to counsel and encourage participants to trust their abilities, commit to scientific careers, enroll in college and become lifelong learners.

After receiving his UW-Green Bay bachelor’s degree, Carroll enrolled at MCW and earned his Ph.D. in Cell and Developmental Biology in 2002. He served as a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Visual Science at the University of Rochester in New York and returned to MCW as a faculty member in the Department of Ophthalmology in 2006.

Carroll was recognized previously at UW-Green Bay in 2007, selected by the University and its Alumni Association as recipient of the Outstanding Recent Alumni Award.

UW-Green Bay’s 45th spring-summer commencement will take place at the Kress Events Center on campus at 11:30 a.m. Saturday (May 17). More than 900 graduating students are eligible to participate. A capacity house of approximately 5,000 is expected for the presentation of diplomas and the ceremonies that will include Carroll’s address.

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Vision researcher Carroll, Class of ’97, will deliver commencement address

The commencement address at UW-Green Bay’s spring 2014 graduation ceremony this Saturday (May 17) will be delivered by Dr. Joseph J. Carroll, Ph.D., an associate professor of ophthalmology, biophysics, cell biology, neurobiology and anatomy at the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. His career as an ophthalmology researcher and university professor has resulted in widespread attention for his pioneering work in the study of the human eye at a cellular level. His work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Vision for Tomorrow Foundation and other organizations, and he is the author of more than 60 peer-reviewed publications. Carroll is an alumnus of both the Human Biology program and the Regional Center for Math and Science summer program hosted on campus. For more.

Upward Bound is re-upped through 2017

This happened over the summer, but was heretofore un-noted in this space: UW-Green Bay has been notified by the U.S. Department of Education that funding for the Upward Bound program here was approved through 2017. The five-year grant award began earlier this month, on Sept. 1. Upward Bound will receive $321,054 for the 2012-2013 academic year and roughly $1.6 million for the five-year period. The renewed funding will allow the program to annually serve 77 first-generation, low-income disadvantaged students at Green Bay East, West and Preble high schools. It was especially good news that new grant provided an increase in funds to expand the program and serve an additional 12 students a year.

RCMS program, too

More recently, there was good news, too, with Department of Education notification that UW-Green Bay’s second Upward Bound program — the Regional Center for Math and Science — has also been re-funded. The funding for the math/science focused program is approved through 2018. The RCMS funding involves $308,858 for the 2012-2013 academic year and roughly $1.85 million for the six-year period through 2018. The renewal funding for this program was also increased to allow the program to annually serve 75 first-generation, low-income disadvantaged students from across the Upper Midwest, an increase of 10 students over last year’s participation.

Congratulations…

UW-Green Bay has a long and proud history of helping underrepresented students from disadvantaged backgrounds prepare for, gain admission to, and succeed in higher education. The Upward Bound program has been continuously funded for 22 years, and the Regional Center for Mathematics and Science has been funded for 20 years. (No small feat. Schools can and do lose their authorization following periodic reviews.) Over two decades, the federal TRIO programs in place at UW-Green Bay have helped hundreds of high school students realize their goals of successfully pursuing a postsecondary education. Tutoring, advising, college visits, cultural events and six-week summer residential experiences on campus are among the services provided.