No plastic recycling during break (but bring in those old holiday light strings)

Students from PEAC have pulled the plastic film collection bins during the semester break and will return them for collection once the spring semester has started. People should be encouraged to deposit their plastic bags at local grocery stores in the meantime. The bins to recycle holiday lights will remain on the Green Bay campus until mid-January. Please recycle!

Learn how to help save the environment with PEAC’s Plastic Film Program

Without even knowing it, you may be harming the very ecosystem you inhabit everyday. However, the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s Public and Environmental Affairs Council (PEAC) plastic film recycling program is seeking to make the community more sustainable by getting plastic out of the waste stream.

The program was started in spring 2014 by a UW-Green Bay undergraduate student and PEAC member completing an internship. In September 2014, PEAC took over the program. The organization meets every Tuesday, specifically for plastic film bailing, but they also organize and lead bailing events and “sorority nights” for Kappa Beta Gamma to help raise awareness and to get people more involved.

PEAC restarted the program three weeks before the Fall 2019 semester started after being on break since April 2019. In the three weeks before school started up again, PEAC spent about 38 hours in the bailing room working to get the mountain of plastic down that had accumulated over the summer.

“The easiest way for members of the campus community to help is to simply be informed!” says Katherine Bruni, a PEAC member. “There are collection bins in almost every academic building on campus, each with a sign detailing what can and cannot be recycled through the program.”

Faculty, staff and students are encouraged to bring in plastic bags and plastic film. No plastic bottles, saran wrap, tape, stickers or dirty plastic, please.

“We are always looking for more volunteers to get involved and help spread the word about the program,” said Bruni. The organization meets every Tuesday at 5 p.m. either in the Mauthe Center main room or by the GAC Lab for plastic bailing. If students are unable to make meetings, they can reach out to PEAC (sopeac@uwgb.edu) to learn how to recycle plastic themselves. In addition, PEAC is hosting a “Make a Difference Day” event on Friday, Oct. 25, 2019, including plastic film bailing from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.

With a strong foundation set at the UW-Green Bay main campus, PEAC is looking to potentially expand the plastic film recycling program to the Marinette, Manitowoc and Sheboygan campuses in order to have an even greater impact and more involvement.

For more information, check PEAC out on Facebook or contact sopeac@uwgb.edu.

Image-26        Image-24   PEAC-13

Story by Marketing and University Communication student assistant, Joshua Konecke.
Photos submitted by PEAC.

 

 

iPat kicks-off fall film series with ‘Chasing Coral’ Monday, Oct. 8

The iPat (impact = population * affluence* technology) environmental film series kicks off Monday, Oct. 8, 2018 at 7 p.m. in the Christie Theater, Green Bay Campus, with a presentation of the film Chasing Coral, followed by a brief discussion. The film explores the increasing problem of disappearing coral reefs around the world with images from reefs in more than 30 countries and includes clips from more than 500 hours of underwater footage. The event is free and open to the public. The film series this fall is sponsored by Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI), Public and Environmental Affairs and Public and Environmental Affairs Council (PEAC).

Celebrate UW-Green Bay Food Day, Wednesday, Oct. 25

Help promote healthy eating by attending UW-Green Bay’s annual Food Day event. The event will be held Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017 from 1 to 7 p.m. in the Phoenix Room of the Union University. The event is free and open to both the campus and Green Bay community. Sponsored by the UW-Green Bay student organizations Dietetics Health Fitness Club, the Public and Environmental Affairs Council (PEAC) and Sustainable Local and Organic (SLO), the purpose of Food Day is to educate, spread awareness and motivate the campus and community to support local farmers by choosing more locally sourced whole food through a fun, educational event. See the press release for more.

Health takes precedence at UW-Green Bay Food Day

Organizers expect 300 for presentations, Expo and farm to table dinner

GREEN BAY – Help promote healthy eating by attending the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s annual Food Day event. The event will be held Wednesday, October 25, 2017 from 1 to 7 p.m. in the Phoenix Room of the Union University. The event is free and open to both the campus and Green Bay community.

Sponsored by the UW-Green Bay student organizations Dietetics Health Fitness Club, the Public and Environmental Affairs Council (PEAC) and Sustainable Local and Organic (SLO), the purpose of Food Day is to educate, spread awareness and motivate the campus and community to support local farmers by choosing more locally sourced whole food through a fun, educational event.

The list of activities at the event is as follows:

  • 1-3 p.m. – Presentations by local businesses, farmers and professors
  • 3-6 p.m. – Food, Health, and Sustainability Expo.
  • 5 p.m. – Free, locally sourced farm to table dinner
  • 6 p.m. – Special guest speaker Polly Dalton, community supported farmer in Stevens Point
  • Desserts and refreshments will also be served at this time

The UW-Green Bay Dietetics Health Fitness club consists of about 100 students who love nutrition and overall health. The annual Food Day is their biggest event, but they do put on others like the Spring Food Fair and the Earth Day Picnic. It is their goal to promote healthy eating and fitness throughout the campus and the Green Bay communities by providing fun and education events.

About the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is a comprehensive public institution offering undergraduate and graduate programs to 7,158 students. The University transforms lives and communities through exceptional and award-winning teaching and research, innovative learning opportunities and a problem-solving approach to education. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu.

1758###

UW-Green Bay iPat Film: ‘Big Boys Gone Bananas’, April 3

The UW-Green Bay iPat environmental film series returns with a screening of “Big Boys Gone Bananas” at 7 p.m. Monday, April 3, 2017 in the UW-Green Bay Christie Theatre. The film has been called a classic David vs. Goliath story. Find out what happens to a documentary filmmaker when he goes up against a large corporation like Dole Foods. The iPat Film Series is sponsored by the Public and Environmental Affairs Council, The Center for Public Affairs, the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs and the Brown County Library. All showings are free and open to the public. Following each film, a local expert will be on hand to offer commentary and answer questions. For questions, contact Ashley Heath, heatha@uwgb.edu.

PEAC announced World Water Day program

From 3:30 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, March 22 (World Water Day) Kimberlee Wright, Executive Director of Midwest Environmental Advocates (MEA), will speak about the Petition for Corrective Action, which questions the enforcement of the Clean Water Act by state and national agencies, and a request to the EPA to take action. The program is sponsored by the Public and Environmental Affairs Council (PEAC). Questions can be directed to Matt Malcore, malcmt02@uwgb.edu.

iPat film series returns on Monday, March 7

The next film in the iPat series is “Wrenched,” — exploring deviant behavior as a mode of achieving environmental action. The film will be shown at 7 p.m. Monday, March 7 in the Christie Theatre. “When environmental consequences of human activity are unacceptable, is socially unacceptable behavior acceptable? What are the limits when trying to bring about environmental change?” See the movie and interact with faculty  (Public and Environmental Affairs) Karen Dalke and Elizabeth Wheat, as they provide a reaction to this film about Edward Abbey and the kind of eco-activism to which his name has become attached. Open to the public. Free admission and popcorn. Monitoring and sign-in available for extra credit if faculty provide notification. iPat stands for Impact = population, affluence and technology. The series is sponsored by Public and Environmental Affairs, the Center for Public Affairs, PEAC and The Campus Common Theme.

Reminder: Film ‘The Power of One Voice’ is here tonight

The first of the iPat Film Series will be shown at 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 1 in the Christie Theatre. Join the screening for The Power of One Voice. (“This 50-year perspective on the life of Rachel Carson is a groundbreaking documentary examining her life and the profound implications of her environmental work. Today, Rachel Carson remains a role model and inspiration for people across the globe, even as controversy created by her challenge to the chemical industry continues unabated.”)  Free admission and popcorn. Discussion to follow.  The film series is sponsored by Public and Environmental Affairs, the Center for Public Affairs, PEAC and the Campus Common Theme. It is free and open to the public.

iPat Film ‘The Power of One Voice’ is here Monday, Feb. 1

The first of the iPat Film Series will be shown at 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 1 in the Christie Theatre. Join the screening for The Power of One Voice. (“This 50-year perspective on the life of Rachel Carson is a groundbreaking documentary examining her life and the profound implications of her environmental work. Today, Rachel Carson remains a role model and inspiration for people across the globe, even as controversy created by her challenge to the chemical industry continues unabated.”)  Free admission and popcorn. Discussion to follow.  The film series is sponsored by Public and Environmental Affairs, The Center for Public Affairs, PEAC and The Campus Common Theme. It is free and open to the public.