Professor hopes to join Tuesday’s panel on Paris aftermath

Sarah Meredith Livingston, emailing us from Karlovy Vary, says she’s hoping to make it back stateside in time to participate in the panel discussion “Global Terrorism: The World after the Paris Attacks.” If she does, she’ll share reflections on the current feeling and reaction in Europe to the Paris attacks and how it has affected her visit. The program, featuring at least four faculty presenters addressing the topic from their particular area of expertise, begins at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday (Nov. 24) in Phoenix Room C of the University Union.

‘Women in STEM Fields’ is panel topic Nov. 5


Join the Women’s and Gender Studies Program and the Green Bay Chapter of the American Association of University Women for a panel on women in the STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 5, in Phoenix Room A in the University Union. Mark your calendars. We’ll have more details on panelists in a future issue of this newsletter, or contact Prof. Christine Smith of Women’s and Gender Studies.

Panel on race relations, policing draws community attention

race-relationsA panel discussion on “Race Relations and the Local Police” attracted large attendance Tuesday night (April 14) at the Union’s Phoenix Room. Hosted by the American Intercultural Center, moderated by Justin Mallett and featuring Mayor Jim Schmitt, local police chiefs (UWGB’s Tom Kujawa included) and representatives of the African-American community on the panel, the event also drew extensive and positive media coverage.
Fox 11
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WBAY-TV previews Tuesday’s forum on race relations, policing

A panel discussion on “Race Relations and the Local Police” is scheduled to take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesday (April 14) at the Union’s Phoenix Room. WBAY-TV offers a preview. They interviewed Justin Mallett of the American Intercultural Center, which is hosting the event, and Public Safety Director Tom Kujawa. A “shoot/don’t shoot” training simulator in the University Union’s 1965 Room will be available to students and others most of the day, giving participants an opportunity to gain a better appreciation of a law enforcement officer’s perspective on potential deadly force situations.
To see the TV-2 story
To see the University news release

Tuesday’s panel discussion will tackle race relations, policing


A panel discussion on “Race Relations and the Local Police” is scheduled to take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesday (April 14), in the Union’s Phoenix Room. The free public event will feature panelists including Green Bay Police Chief Tom Molitor, Mayor Jim Schmitt, UW-Green Bay Public Safety Director Tom Kujawa, Public Safety Training Coordinator Michael Molnar of NWTC, and Pastors Paul Davis of Kingdom Agenda Church and L.C. Green of Divine Temple Church. Organizer and moderator Justin Mallett, director of diversity, says he appreciates that police and members of the local community already have experience in maintaining an ongoing dialog. “The event isn’t intended to criticize the police or their efforts,” Mallett says. “It’s to ask questions and help more people understand what our community is doing to continue to make sure these events (in Madison and Ferguson, Mo., for example) don’t happen in Green Bay.”

UW-Green Bay to host panel discussion on race relations, policing

A panel discussion on “Race Relations and the Local Police” is scheduled to take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 14, at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

Hosted by the University’s American Intercultural Center, the event will take place in the Phoenix Room on the main level of the University Union on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Drive. The event is free and open to the public.

Panelists will include Green Bay Police Chief Tom Molitor, Green Bay Mayor Jim Schmitt, UW-Green Bay Public Safety Director Tom Kujawa, Public Safety Training Coordinator Michael Molnar of Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, and Pastors Paul Davis of Kingdom Agenda Church and L.C. Green of Divine Temple Church, both of Green Bay.

The moderator will be Justin Mallett, director of diversity for UW-Green Bay. Mallett, a native of Kosciusko, Miss., who holds a doctorate in educational leadership, joined the staff last July. In the wake of highly publicized police shootings involving African Americans in Ferguson, Mo., and Madison, he says he has been pleased to learn that Green Bay police and members of the local community already have experience in maintaining an ongoing dialog.

“The event (on the 14th) isn’t intended to criticize the police or their efforts,” Mallett says. “It’s to ask questions and help more people understand what our community is doing to continue to make sure these events don’t happen in Green Bay. I expect that students will share their perceptions of the local police and public safety. Some of their questions could be direct and even pointed, but it’s my view that we won’t be able to move forward with our overall mission if people just want to criticize and blame.”

Earlier in the day, from 11:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday,  Molnar, of NWTC, will set up a “shoot/don’t shoot” training simulator in the University Union’s 1965 Room.  This will give participants an opportunity to gain a better appreciation of a law enforcement officer’s perspective on potential deadly force situations.  Up to two individuals can sign up to participate in each 15-minute block in the training simulator.  Participants will be provided a short orientation prior to the simulated exercise and time to debrief afterwards.  A sign-up sheet to participate in the simulated exercise is available at the American Intercultural Center, University Union Room 150.

Nationally, some activists have urged that April 14 be a day of walkouts and protests over police shootings. Mallett says he hopes the event at UW-Green Bay gives local college and high school students an opportunity to share their perceptions of these national incidents, to learn from fellow community members about the history of race relations locally, and to be pro-active in contributing to positive police-community relations.

Anyone with questions about the event may contact Mallett at MallettJ@uwgb.edu or (920) 465-2720.

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Reminder: UW-Green Bay and its community

A panel discussion regarding connections between UW-Green Bay and its community is planned for 7 p.m. Thursday (April 2) in Mary Ann Cofrin Hall (Mac) 210. Speakers include Green Bay Mayor Jim Schmitt and his chief of Staff Andy Rosendahl, Karen Faulkner of Golden House, students Sarah Wanek and Lydia Schwertfeger and Profs Regan Gurung, Katia Levintova and Alison Staudinger. The event is sponsored by the Student Government Association and UWGB’s campus Common Theme committee.

Hutchison and ‘Constructing a New Hmong Narrative’

Sociology Prof. Ray Hutchison has additional details to share regarding the panel session he is organizing for the Spring 2015 Hmong Conference at UW-Madison in April. An abstract: 
In Hmong Refugee’s Death Fugue, author Sheng-mei Ma presents an analogy of the Hmong story-cloth tradition with the usual Hmong narrative of the loss of homeland and subsequent life as refugees in the United States as a means of explaining the Hmong experience to outside groups, and to organizing the community from the inside. Within this narrative, Hmong participation in the Second Indo China War and later social organization among groups associated with the General Vang Pao military leadership became the dominant feature of Hmong social and political life in the United States. Although contested by some, particularly among the younger generation, this narrative continued to dominate until recent years. But now, with the passing of General Vang Pao and the emergence of a new cohort of Hmong leaders, it is appropriate to ask what the New Hmong Narrative will be: How will we deal with the earlier history of Hmong involvement in the American war? How do we explain the almost singular focus on these issues among Hmong leadership from the time of arrival in the United States? Can a new generation of Hmong leadership be incorporated within this older structure, or is a new set of institutions required?
 Participants in the discussion include Vincent Her (UW-La Crosse), Mai Na Lee (University of Minnesota), Pao Lor (UW-Green Bay), and Chong Moua (UW-Madison). Hutchison, director of the Hmong Studies Center at UW-Green Bay, will serve as moderator for the discussion.

 

‘Race Relations in the American South’ features Miller, Mallett, Austin

Georgia Miller and Justin Mallett, natives of the state of Mississippi, will be among the featured speakers at 2 p.m. Thursday (Feb. 26) in the Union’s Christie Theatre for a discussion of “Race Relations in the American South.” Also joining the panel is Associate Prof. Andrew Austin of Democracy and Justice Studies. The panel will use documentary films as the starting point for a conversation about how race relations have unfolded in Southern politics, the legacies of African Americans who directly challenged Jim Crow, white segregationists who resisted those challenges, and political actors of all races and approaches. Free and open to the public.

Pride Center presents LGBTQ panel Feb. 4

Come expand your understanding of LGBTQ home and work life at “LGBTQ Guest Panel: Home and Work,” from 7-8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 4 in the Christie Theatre. Topics include: starting up a long term relationship, foster care, adoption and living full time at work and home as a transgender person. Confidential questions are welcome from the audience. Sponsored and led by the UW-Green Bay Pride Center. Everyone is welcome!