International Women’s Day event held on Marinette Campus, Thursday, Mar. 7

There will be an International Women’s Day: Women’s Wisdom Forum held on the UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus on Thursday, Mar. 7, 2019. The exhibit hall will open at 5:30 p.m., with the speaker panel discussion to begin at 6:30 p.m. Hear from some of the most influential and inspiring women in Marinette and Menominee Counties as they share their experiences and prove strategies for personal and professional success. UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus lecturer Jessica Warwick (Biology) and UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Megan Olson Hunt (Natural and Applied Sciences) will be featured on the panel. Register for the event.

Upcoming inclusivity and equity events

The Inclusivity and Equity Certificate Program is offering three more events in the University Union’s Christie Theatre for fall 2016, for students, faculty, staff and the public. The first event is from 10 to 11 a.m. on Wednesday, November 2, entitled “Students who are also Parents: Guest Panel.” The panel will be moderated by Prof. Kimberley Reilly (Democracy and Social Justice Studies). Students will talk about the challenges and benefits one experiences as one attends school and cares for children at the same time. If you wish to register for Inclusivity and Equity Certificate credit go to: http://uwgreenbay.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_6rFXnyAFX6bxnc9, although registration is not mandatory to attend.

  • From Noon until 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 9, view a 30-minute UW-Lacrosse film created by students of color, called “Inclusive Negligence: Helping Educators Address Racial Inequality at UW-Lacrosse.” Following the viewing will be a discussion.
  • From 2 to 3 p.m., Friday, Nov. 18, “Inclusivity and Equity Series: Non-traditional Students Panel.” Students who are veterans and returning adults will talk about their experiences as students who do not fit the traditional typecast. For more information, please contact Stacie Christian at christis@uwgb.edu.

Law school and legal career panel

UW-Green Bay alumni will gather to form a law school and legal career panel from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 24, in MAC 206. The panelists will be discussing their experiences in law school, taking the bar exam and practicing law, and will also be answering any questions the audience may have. Contact Kris Coulter with any questions, coulterk@uwgb.edu.

Reminder: Panel discussion (tomorrow) First Nations environmental perspectives

Prof. Elizabeth Wheat is hosting a panel discussion on First Nations environmental perspectives in her Natural Resources Law, Administration, and Policy course, from 12:30 to 1:50 p.m. in MAC 237, Tuesday, April 12. The public is welcome to attend. Panelists are:

  • Jeffrey M. Mears, member of the Oneida Tribe, has worked in the Environmental Health & Safety Division for 21 years. Mears has chaired the Oneida Land Commission and been a member of the National EPA-Tribal Science Council, National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology Advisory Committee, EPA Region 5 Regional Tribal Operating Committee, and the Northeast Climate Change Science Center advisory committee.
  • UWGB student Marcus Grignon, member of the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin. His professional career encompasses issue-based campaigns, advocacy, lobbying, food security, sustainable development, and electoral politics.
  • UWGB graduate student Gregory Holder, who works as a Cultural Resources Specialist in the Education Center for First Nations Studies and is completing his thesis on the Three Sisters Garden, which includes developing a nutritional profile of a Native heirloom squash strain and exploring a Native Food System movement that is succeeding on two reservations in South Dakota. His ancestry is Lakota, Wichita, and French. He lives on the Oneida Indian Reservation.

Panel discussions highlight diverse religious beliefs

UWGB’s Diversity Task Force, Social Work undergraduate students, and the Inclusive Excellence Inclusivity and Equity Certificate Program, have collaborated to bring two different guest panels focused on the topic of diverse religious beliefs so attendees can consider their discussions as it relates to inclusivity of individuals with varying religious beliefs. The two guest panel events have a diverse selection of religious leaders who will talk about what makes their religious beliefs unique. The purpose is for attendees to have a better understanding of the diversity within religions. These guest panels are from 3 to 4:30 p.m. April 12 and 28 in the Christie Theatre. Students, employees and the public are invited. Contact Stacie Christian at christis@uwgb.edu from more information.

Hmong and Southeast Asian Americans featured in guest panel

Faculty, staff, students and the public are invited to listen and offer questions to a guest panel of students who are Hmong or Southeast Asian Americans. The focus of their discussion will be about their experiences at UWGB and how UWGB can assist with the students feeling included and welcome on campus. Questions will be gathered from the audience. This guest panel is from 3 to 4 p.m. Thursday, April 14 in the Christie Theatre. Sponsored by the Inclusivity and Equity Certificate Program.

Panel discussion of First Nations environmental perspectives

Prof. Elizabeth Wheat will be hosting a panel discussion on First Nations environmental perspectives in her Natural Resources Law, Administration, and Policy course, from 12:30 to 1:50 in MAC 237, Tuesday, April 12. The public is welcome to attend. Panelists are:

  • Jeffrey M. Mears, member of the Oneida Tribe, has worked in the Environmental Health & Safety Division for 21 years. Mears has chaired the Oneida Land Commission and been a member of the National EPA-Tribal Science Council, National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology Advisory Committee, EPA Region 5 Regional Tribal Operating Committee, and the Northeast Climate Change Science Center advisory committee.
  • UWGB student Marcus Grignon, member of the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin. His professional career encompasses issue-based campaigns, advocacy, lobbying, food security, sustainable development, and electoral politics.
  • UWGB graduate student Gregory Holder, who works as a Cultural Resources Specialist in the Education Center for First Nations Studies and is completing his thesis on the Three Sisters Garden, which includes developing a nutritional profile of a Native heirloom squash strain and exploring a Native Food System movement that is succeeding on two reservations in South Dakota. His ancestry is Lakota, Wichita, and French. He lives on the Oneida Indian Reservation.

We Can’t Look Away: A panel on the world refugee crisis

UW-Green Bay professors David Coury, Katia Levintova and Heidi Sherman along with St. Norbert College faculty and UWGB alumni will present a panel discussion on the current state of the refugee crisis. Panelists will focus primarily on the relationship between Syria and Europe and the current reactions of the European population. The event is at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 9 in the Christie Theatre, UW-Green Bay.  Questions can be directed to Jemma Lund, Office of International Education, at lundj@uwgb.edu.

UW-Green Bay plans panel discussion on race, colleges, communities

A panel discussion on “Being a Minority in a Predominantly White Community while Attending a Predominantly White Institution” is scheduled to take place from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Monday (Dec. 7) at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

Hosted by the University’s American Intercultural Center, the event will take place in the Phoenix Room of the University Union on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Drive. The event is free and open to the public.

Panelists will include student Christian Parker, the Diversity and Inclusion Chair for UW-Green Bay’s Student Government Association; Adrianne Fletcher, assistant professor of Social Work at UW-Green Bay; Robyn Davis, an attorney and president of the Freedom House homeless and service center of Green Bay; Interim Chief Jim Lewis of the Green Bay Police Department; and student Carrington Love, a member of the Phoenix men’s basketball team.

The moderator will be Justin Mallett, director of diversity for UW-Green Bay. Mallett, a native of Kosciusko, Miss., who holds a doctorate in educational leadership, joined the staff in July 2014. This past April, in the wake of highly publicized police shootings involving African Americans in Ferguson, Mo., and Madison, Wis., Mallett and the AIC hosted a well-attended forum on police and community relations. Law enforcement, community and political leaders shared their insight.

“In view of the more recent events that have been taking place at the University of Missouri, at Yale and other campuses around the country, we want to continue the dialogue about race relations in Green Bay,” Mallett says. “This is about having a conversation where we can all work together, and it is also a way to show our minority students there are professionals on campus and in the community who care about their concerns.”

It is expected the Dec. 7 discussion will focus primarily on African-American experiences in Green Bay — in keeping with the nature of the national incidents over the past year — but Mallett says the topic of discussion will not be limited to any particular culture, group or race. He also invites audience participation from both on and off campus.

UW-Green Bay has posted steady diversity gains in recent years. Underrepresented minorities now make up about 11 percent of total fall 2015 enrollment (714 of 6,779 individuals), and another 2 percent (113 students) are from other minority backgrounds. Although those numbers position UW-Green Bay among the UW System leaders in terms of percentage of diverse enrollment, University officials say there is much room for growth.

Anyone with questions about the event may contact Mallett at MallettJ@uwgb.edu or (920) 465-2720.