Prof. Kaye to present two short films at Neville Public Museum this Wednesday (Dec. 5)

UW-Green Bay Ben & Joyce Rosenberg Professor Harvey J. Kaye (Democracy and Justice Studies) will be introducing two shorts films from the 1940s and discussing Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech as part of the Green Bay Film Society’s International Film Series at the Neville Public Museum, this Wednesday, Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. Prof. Kaye’s most recent book, “The Fight for the Four Freedoms: What Made FDR and the Greatest Generation Truly Great,” analyzes the social and historical context of the speech as well as Norman Rockwell’s visual representation of them. Kaye was then asked by Turner Classic Movies to select and present four films that represented each freedom. He’ll discuss the speech and two of those films as part of the series. The event is free and open to the public.

Reminder: Free STEAM Engine VII at the Neville Museum this Wednesday, Nov. 14

The STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics) Engine VII event at the Neville Museum will be taking on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018 at 6 p.m. This event is free and open to the public. The STEAM Engine is an interactive event held at the Neville Museum that features speakers with exciting projects, new business ventures and cutting edge research. The STEAM Engine showcases individuals and organizations in the region who are seeking new horizons in the disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics. The events kick off at 6 p.m. with a short live music performance followed by presentations, including one from UW-Green Bay lecturer Benjamin Geisler (Computer Science), and Q & A. The social networking hour with soda, Titletown beer and popcorn rounds out the night. Learn more.

Free STEAM Engine event to take place at Neville Museum on Wednesday, Nov. 14

The STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics) Engine VII event at the Neville Museum will be taking on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018 at 6 p.m. This event is free and open to the public. The STEAM Engine is an interactive event held at the Neville Museum that features speakers with exciting projects, new business ventures and cutting edge research. The STEAM Engine showcases individuals and organizations in the region who are seeking new horizons in the disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics. The events kick off at 6 p.m. with a short live music performance followed by presentations, including one from lecturer Benjamin Geisler (Computer Science), and Q & A. The social networking hour with soda, Titletown beer and popcorn rounds out the night. Learn more.

‘Loving Vincent’ screening set for Wednesday, Sept. 19 at the Neville Public Museum

On Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, the Green Bay Film Society will hold a screening of the 2017 film Loving Vincent” at 7 p.m. at the Neville Public Museum. This event will be presented by Prof. Carol Emmons (Art) and is sponsored by UW-Green Bay Humanities, the Neville Museum and the Brown County Library. Get more information on this event.

Professors Gates and Watson to address gender roles using images

In a free event at the Neville Public Museum on Tuesday, Oct. 3 at 7 p.m., Prof. Alison Gates and Assistant Prof. Sam Watson (Art and Design) will examine how gender is constructed through images and what images reinforce gender roles or transgress society’s expectations of gender performance. The event is open to the public. Note: Some images discussed may not be appropriate for young audience members.

Prof. Smith to present on the gender binary

Social psychologist and UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. (Human Development, Psychology and Women’s Gender Studies), Christine Smith, will present on the gender binary at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 26 at the Neville Public Museum. Join Smith as she explains why society thinks of gender as binary and whether we can break that “habit.” This talk is part of the “Please Check a Box” series of events organized around UW-Green Bay’s Lawton Gallery art exhibition (Sept. 7 through Oct. 5). More information will be available on the Facebook page of Positive Voice (Northeast Wisconsin’s largest LGBTQ support and outreach organization).

UW-Green Bay becomes gold level sponsor of the STEAM Engine

At a kick-off event, Feb. 22, John Katers, Dean of the College of Science and Technology, announced that UW–Green Bay has committed as a gold level sponsor of “STEAM Engine,” events, as they align closely with the College of Science and Technology and the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. STEAM Engine represents science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics. The inaugural event at the Neville Public Museum included presentations by Sam Hunt, current UW-Green Bay student in mathematics and education, and Associate Prof. Dan Meinhardt (Human Biology). Topics for the five presentations were

  • Ready-to-eat local food + social business = multiple benefits
  • The biochemical effects of stress on our health
  • Proto STEAM project and workshop development
  • Art Symposium: a look at the future of Art in Green Bay
  • What’s sex got to do with it?

Additional information on the STEAM Engine can be found at www.steamenginegb.com. The remaining STEAM Engine events for this year will be held on May 16, August 15 and November 21 at the Neville Museum, with presentations at 7 p.m. and a social to follow.

UW-Green Bay helps others see immigration through a different lens

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is hosting program beginning in Februrary to help middle school students and their families gain a deeper understanding about local immigration. Students will see three films and a theatrical production with follow-up discussion about what leads to immigration. Each event will be hosted by a UW-Green Bay faculty member who will lead a discussion and answer questions. In conjunction with the Green Bay Film Society, a second evening performance will be free and open to the public. See more.

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UW-Green Bay helps others see immigration through a different lens

Programming begins in February for middle-schoolers, public

Green Bay, Wis. — The world is witnessing the highest levels of displacement on record, according to the United Nations High Commission on Refugees. More than 33,000 people are forced to flee their homes daily and more than 65 million forcibly were displaced people worldwide.

This displacement is concerning both globally and locally. The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s Humanistic Studies Program received a grant from the Wisconsin Humanities Council for a project — Displacement and Immigration: Through a Different Lens — to help middle school students and their families gain a deeper understanding about global displacement of people as well as local immigration.

In partnership with the Neville Public Museum, the students will see three films and a theatrical production with follow-up discussion about what leads to immigration — both what pushes people from their home countries and what draws them to their new homes — and the impact this displacement has on communities. Each event will be hosted by a UW-Green Bay faculty member who will lead a discussion and answer questions. In conjunction with the Green Bay Film Society, a second evening performance will be held for the general public, with the hopes that parents and others attend in order to continue the conversation at home.

The daytime events are for school children and educators. The evening events are free and open to the public. All presentations are at the Neville Public Museum, with the exception of the 7 p.m. March 27 presentation at St Norbert College’s Birder Hall.

The films explore:

  • a Syrian refugee camp
  • an undocumented Latina pursuing the arts in California
  • and the odyssey of a Hmong family who waits in a Thai refugee camp before eventual settlement in the U.S.

The one-person theatrical performance tells the true story of a German-Jewish man who has the choice of secretly assimilating to the German culture by hiding his Jewish ancestry, or flee his homeland during World War II.

Films titles and summaries are as follows:

Salam Neighbor (USA, 2015)
To better understand refugee life, filmmaker Chris Temple spent one month living alongside displaced Syrian and Iraqi families in the Za’atari refugee camp. As the first filmmakers allowed inside a refugee camp, he was able to provide a never before seen look into the world’s most pressing crisis.

Feb 14 at 12:30 p.m. (Filmmaker Chris Temple will join us via Skype)
Feb 15 at 7 p.m.

The Mitzvah Project
Through one soldier’s story, this one-act play reveals the startling history of tens of thousands of “partial Jews” who served in Hitler’s military, most of whom were discharged in 1940. Nearly all were sent to forced labor camps — or worse. The short play is followed by a talk back with its actor/star engaging in socio-historical questions about identity, race and ethnicity.

March 27 at 7 p.m. at St Norbert College’s Birder Hall
March 29 at 12:30 p.m.

Becoming American (USA, 1982)
Hang Sou and his family await resettlement in a refugee camp in Thailand after fleeing their war-consumed native Laos. Becoming American records their odyssey as they travel to and resettle in the United States. As they face nine months of culture shock and prejudice, they gradually adapt to their new home in Seattle. Presented by Prof. Pao Lor and Prof. Christin DePouw (Education, UW-Green Bay)

April 18 at 12:30 p.m.
April 19 at 7 p.m.

Inocente (USA, 2012)
At 15, Inocente refuses to let her dreams of becoming an artist be caged by her life as an undocumented immigrant and homeless for the last nine years. Her colorful paintings create a world that looks nothing like her own dark past.  Told in her own words, Inocente is a story about the transformative power of art and a timely snapshot of the new face of homelessness in America. Presented by Prof. Cristina Ortiz (Spanish, UW-Green Bay)

May 9 at 12:30 p.m.
May 10 at 7 p.m.

Wisconsin Humanities Council, Neville Public Museum, UW-Green Bay and the Green Bay Film Society are supporting this series. For more information, contact David Coury (couryd@uwgb.edu)

About the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is a comprehensive public institution offering undergraduate and graduate programs to 6,700 students. The University transforms lives and communities through exceptional and award-winning teaching and research, innovative learning opportunities, and a problem-solving approach to education. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu.

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