Education’s Cortes speaks tonight in ‘Latino Americans’ series

The campus/community series “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” continues with the screening of another film segment and a talk by UW-Green Bay Prof. of Education Aurora Cortes starting at 6 p.m. tonight (Friday, Nov. 20) at the YWCA, 230 S. Madison St.  “Empire of Dreams (1880-1942) is the topic, with one immigrant’s tale, and a look at how the Great Depression ended an era of relative prosperity and optimism. Tonight’s program, sponsored in conjunction with Casa Alba, is the fourth in this year’s “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” series organized by UW-Green Bay in conjunction with the American Library Association and a National Endowment for the Humanities grant. See site for more details. 

Reminder: Series continues with Peruvian author’s talk on ‘New Latinos’


The campus/community series “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” continues with the screening of another film segment and a talk by Peruvian-born author Marie Arana at 6 p.m. Wednesday (Oct. 21) in the Christie Theatre. “The New Latinos” is the topic. Wednesday’s event is the third in this year’s “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” series organized by UW-Green Bay in conjunction with the American Library Association and a National Endowment for the Humanities grant.

The ‘New Latinos’ will be topic Oct. 21


The campus/community series “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” continues this week with the screening of another film segment and a talk by a Peruvian-born author who will facilitate discussion during a program beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday (Oct. 21) in the Christie Theatre of the University Union. “The New Latinos” is the topic of the guest speaker Marie Arana, a native of Lima, Peru, and the daughter of a Peruvian father and American mother. Her memoir, Chica: Two Worlds, One Childhood, was a finalist in various book competitions. The talk is the third in this year’s “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” series organized by UW-Green Bay in conjunction with the American Library Association and a National Endowment for the Humanities grant.

Latino American history is topic of film, discussion Sept. 24 at Neville

santiago-vaquera-webScreening of a one-hour segment of the 2013 PBS documentary Latino Americans will be accompanied by a lecture and discussion featuring visiting author and scholar Santiago Vaquera-Vásquez this Thursday evening (Sept. 24) at the Neville Public Museum of Brown County.

The program, free and open to the public, begins at 6 p.m. at the Museum at 210 Museum Place on the west bank of the Fox River in downtown Green Bay. The program kicks off this year’s “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” series organized by UW-Green Bay in conjunction with the American Library Association and a National Endowment for the Humanities grant.

Vaquera-Vásquez is an assistant professor of creative writing and Hispanic Southwestern Literatures at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of the book One Day I’ll Tell You the Things I’ve Seen, a collection of stories about international borders and men and women “from Madrid to Mexico City, from California to Istanbul” with experience in two or more cultures.

“My scholarly work is about border-crossers and communities in contact, and how identities start being shaped by bicultural contact,” Vaquera-Vásquez told the Latin Post earlier this year. “So, I started off by looking at the U.S./Mexican border when I was living at the University of Iowa. I looked at the way migrant Mexican communities and small farming communities in the Midwest started being shaped and reshaped … and it goes both ways. The farming community expected the migrant workers to assimilate, and they, themselves, started incorporating this community into part of their experience, which I thought was fascinating.”

Thursday’s event begins with refreshments, music and brief opening remarks by Green Bay Mayor Jim Schmitt, among others. Vaquera-Vásquez will talk about his work and introduce the one-hour segment of the PBS documentary titled “Prejudice and Pride.” A question-and-answer and discussion session follows the film.

A collaborative effort by UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members resulted in the $10,000 grant award from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association to fund the local “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” project. The public events, presentations, discussions and showings of the PBS series are part of a larger, national NEH and ALA initiative called The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square.

The UW-Green Bay organizing committee — consisting of faculty members Marcelo Cruz (project director), Aurora Cortez and Gabriel Saxton Ruiz and staff members Paula Ganyard, Mai Lo Lee and Lidia Nonn — has proposed a series of communitywide events at various local venues. The group will work with Neville Museum, Brown County Library, Casa Alba and other community organizations to bring the series and discussion to the greater Green Bay community.

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Assistant Prof. Staudinger chosen as National Endowment for Humanities scholar

Alison Staudinger, an assistant professor in Democracy and Justice Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, has been selected as an National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Scholar.

Selected from a national applicant pool, Staudinger will attend one of 30 seminars and institutes supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Endowment is a federal agency that, each summer, supports these enrichment opportunities at colleges, universities and cultural institutions, so that faculty can work in collaboration and study with experts in humanities disciplines.

Staudinger will participate in an institute entitled “Reconsidering Flannery O’Connor.” The four-week program will be held in Milledgeville, Ga., at Georgia College and State University, and will be co-directed by Prof. Marshall Bruce Gentry of Georgia College and State University and Prof. Robert Donahoo of Sam Houston State University. Summer Scholars will attend 10 lectures, participate in seminars conducted by four leading O’Connor scholars, and spend a week working with materials available to scholars only through the Georgia College library. They also will work with renowned O’Connor scholars Gary M. Ciuba, Doreen Fowler, Brad Gooch and Virginia Wray.

The 25 teachers selected to participate in the program each receive a stipend of $3,300 to cover their travel, study and living expenses.

Topics for the 30 seminars and institutes offered for college and university teachers this summer are as follows: Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia: Literature, the arts, and cinema since independence; American Maritime People; America’s East Central Europeans: Migration and memory; Arts, architecture and devotional interaction in England, 1200–1600; Black aesthetics and African diasporic culture; Bridging national borders in North America; Dante’s Divine Comedy: Poetry, philosophy and the city of Florence; Daoist literature and history; George Herbert and Emily Dickinson; Jewish Buenos Aires; The Late Ottoman and Russian Empires: Citizenship, belonging and difference; Mapping nature across the Americas; The meanings of property; Medieval political philosophy: Islamic, Jewish and Christian; Mississippi in the national civil rights narrative; The Mongols, Eurasia and global history; Mortality: Facing death in ancient Greece; Performing Dickens: Oliver Twist and Great Expectations on page, stage and screen; Pictorial histories and myths: “Graphic novels” of the Mixtecs and Aztecs; Problems in the study of religion; Reconsidering Flannery O’Connor; Reform and renewal in medieval Rome; Representations of the “other”: Jews in medieval England; Socrates; Tudor books and readers: 1485–1603; The federal government and the American West; The visual culture of the American Civil War; Westward expansion and the Constitution in the early American republic; World War I and the arts; World War I in the Middle East.

The approximately 437 NEH Summer Scholars who participate in these programs of study will teach more than 113,925 American students the following year.

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