Watershed monitoring program receives $2,600-plus “Green Gift” from Cellcom

top-story-watershedUW-Green Bay’s Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program received $2,679 from Cellcom Tuesday (Nov. 4), accepting the “Green Gift” donation as part of the company’s cellphone recycling program.

LFRWMP Outreach and Education Coordinator Annette Pelegrin was on hand for the check presentation, which took place during a morning Biology class at West De Pere High School. The program is a network of Northeastern Wisconsin high school teachers and students who collaborate with UW-Green Bay scientists on a long-term watershed monitoring program, coupling watershed education with the collection of high-quality scientific data. The Cellcom Green Gift will support these efforts, officials said.

“Our program strengthens citizen knowledge of issues impairing the health of our fresh water resources and inspires community stewardship of the Fox-Wolf River Basin and Green Bay,” Pelegrin said. “Additionally, we provide innovative hands-on environmental science opportunities for students and add to a body of scientific data about our watersheds.”

A total of $32,000 was given out to 26 green organizations in Cellcom’s service area, officials said. The company has offered cellphone recycling since 2004 and the Green Gift program since 2010. Through the program, Cellcom donates its recycling funds to environmentally minded area nonprofits.

More information about the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program is available online

Tuesday’s Watershed Monitoring conference was a welcome-home

Just eight years ago, as a Green Bay high school student, Allison Thut helped monitor Baird Creek as part of the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program. She went on to earn her bachelor’s at UW-Green Bay in 2011, and to land a job as a teacher at Pulaski High School. At Tuesday’s LFRWMP workshop on campus, Thut returned, this time as one of the local educators guiding their own students taking part in the regional water quality collaboration. See more.
 

Go Green: Thut has full-circle experience with watershed monitoring

thut-top-storyJust eight years ago Preble High School student Allison Thut worked with teacher Chris Hansel and a team of other students to monitor Baird Creek as part of the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program(LFRWMP).

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Less than a decade later, Hansel and Thut are now peers, and Thut, a science teacher at Pulaski High School, works with her own students (above) to monitor Trout Creek with a teacher and students from Oneida High School. Hansel(pictured) continues to lead the program for Preble.

Annette Pelegrin, UW-Green Bay’s Watershed Outreach and Education Specialist and coordinator of the annual Watershed Symposium today (April 8, 2014) said it is great to see high school participants maintain continuity and passion for the program at a professional level.

“Allison (who graduated from UWGB in 2011) has passion and experience with water quality because for three summers she worked as an intern on the Green Bay Metropolitan Sewage District research vessel that monitors water quality in Green Bay (relating to the recent Green Bay Dead Zone stories),” Pelegrin said. “The program has come full circle!”

More than 90 teachers and students from 11 area high schools participated in the 11th annual daylong symposium, which allows students to share their findings about improving stream health with professional researchers in water quality fields. Highlights include student presentations and poster sessions in the morning, an afternoon tour of the UW-Green Bay campus (including a trip to the Richter Museum of Natural History) and a special “Birding with Bob” campus field trip featuring UW-Green Bay’s nationally renowned ornithologist, Prof. Robert Howe.

The keynote speaker for the event was UW-Green Bay alumnus Dan Cibulka ‘09, an aquatic ecologist with the environmental management firm Enterra, LLC.

Students will share research at annual Fox River Watershed Symposium

Students from area high schools will display and discuss their research at UW-Green Bay on Tuesday, April 8, part of the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program.

The program’s 11th annual Watershed Symposium will highlight results from watershed monitoring in our area and will provide an opportunity for students to interact with teachers and professional scientists. The event, which runs from 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. (complete schedule available online) is free and open to the public.

More than 90 teachers and students from 11 area high schools will participate in the daylong symposium, which allows students to share their findings about improving stream health with professional researchers in water quality fields. Highlights include student presentations and poster sessions in the morning, an afternoon tour of the UW-Green Bay campus (including a trip to the Richter Museum of Natural History) and a special “Birding with Bob” campus field trip featuring UW-Green Bay’s nationally renowned ornithologist, Prof. Robert Howe. The keynote speaker for the event is UW-Green Bay alumnus Dan Cibulka ‘09, an aquatic ecologist with the environmental management firm Enterra, LLC.

The program’s main goal is long-term monitoring of the watershed to provide high-quality data to guide resource management decisions and help predict impacts on the ecosystem. It also is designed to enhance student, teacher and community understanding and stewardship of the Fox River Watershed.

Attendees are asked to register by contacting Annette Pelegrin by phone (920-465-5031) or email. For more information about the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program, and to view school research posters.

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UW-Green Bay to host annual student watershed symposium

Annette Pelegrin shares word that the 11th Annual Student Watershed Symposium —  part of the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program — will take place on campus next Tuesday, April 8. More than 90 teachers and students from 11 area high schools will participate in the daylong event. The symposium allows students to share their findings about improving stream health with professional researchers in water quality fields. Highlights include student presentations and poster sessions in the morning, and an afternoon tour of the UW-Green Bay campus, the Richter Museum, and a special campus field trip “Birding with Bob” featuring our own nationally renowned ornithology professor Robert Howe. The keynote speaker is UW-Green Bay alumnus Dan Cibulka, an aquatic ecologist with environmental management firm Enterra, LLC. The Watershed Symposium is free and open to the public. To register, contact Pelegrin at (920) 465-5031 or pelegria@uwgb.edu.

UW-Green Bay’s Fox Watershed project gets statewide recognition

Two individuals and two local citizen monitoring groups were recognized for their contributions to the health of Wisconsin’s streams at the annual Volunteer Stream Monitoring Symposium held earlier this month at UW-Stevens Point. UW-Green Bay’s Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program was among those receiving recognition. The awards are a joint effort of UW-Extension and the Wisconsin DNR to recognize volunteers who, at present, monitor nearly 600 streams to collect data, raise awareness and share knowledge about Wisconsin streams.

Accepting the Wisconsin Stream Monitoring Award were NAS Prof. Kevin Fermanich, long-time director of the program, and Jill Fermanich, former outreach and school program coordinator, who represented UW-Green Bay faculty and staff, and program teachers and students. For a photo and more background on the award-winning monitoring project, click here.

Fox River Watershed Monitoring earns statewide recognition

Prof. Kevin and Jill Fermanich, Volunteer Stream Monitoring Award

The University of Wisconsin-Extension and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources recognized UW-Green Bay’s Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program (LFRWMP) for its contributions to the state knowledge base about the health of Wisconsin’s streams at the annual Volunteer Stream Monitoring Symposium, held this year at UW-Stevens Point on Feb. 14 and 15.

Kris Stepenuk, of Water Action Volunteers presented the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program with the annual Wisconsin Stream Monitoring Award to recognize UW-Green Bay faculty and staff and program teachers and students for their commitment to monitoring, collecting data, raising awareness and sharing knowledge about Wisconsin streams. Professor Kevin Fermanich, long-time director of the program and Jill Fermanich, former outreach and school program coordinator, accepted the award on behalf of all the program partners.

The Wisconsin Stream Monitoring Award promotes awareness and participation in volunteer stream monitoring work in Wisconsin. Winners receive an engraved plaque and a certificate signed by the Secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

UW-Green Bay and partners established the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program in 2003, with funding from Arjo Wiggins Appleton, LLC. For over 10 years, this innovative program uniquely combines watershed education and the collection of quality scientific data with support from university, business, agency, and community groups. A goal of the program is to collect high quality data for resource restoration decision-making as the Lower Fox River Watershed is restored. Seventy to 85 students and 17 teachers from eleven area high schools participate in the program each year. The school-based teams have created a high quality, long-term database of nutrient, water quality, biological, and habitat conditions of their local streams. Students use their data and field experiences to explore research and management questions in their communities and share their data at an annual Watershed Symposium at UW-Green Bay, and at other community outreach events. This hands-on, problem-focused program develops and enhances scientific literacy and community stewardship which are critical to the long-term success of basin-wide restoration efforts and the sustainability of our most valuable natural resources, the Fox River and Green Bay ecosystems.

Gone green: Photos, story offer highlights of annual EMBI symposium

Keynoter David Orr, filmmaker Jeremy Seifert and alumni award winner Ryan Stockwell provided just a few of the many highlights at this year’s Green Innovations Symposium, presented by the Environmental Management and Business Institute. It was a busy three days for organizers and attendees, who explored this year’s theme of “Urban Agriculture and Community Sustainability” through a variety of discussions and events April 22-24. The annual conference also included the 10th annual Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program Student Watershed Symposium which drew nearly 100 students and teachers from area high schools, in addition to other attendees. Great photos and story.

Watershed monitoring program student featured in National Geographic ‘GeoStory’

A Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program student is featured in a National Geographic ‘GeoStory’ about citizen science across the US. In it, Elizabeth Braatz of Appleton North High School talks about her watershed monitoring research work at Apple Creek. The GeoStory features a photo of Elizabeth presenting research findings at the Lower Fox River Watershed Symposium on the UW-Green Bay campus last year. Elizabeth’s story and thoughts are inspiring and she is a great ambassador for the program! Click here (when you enter the website: click on “start GeoStory” and then click on Braatz’s picture — she is wearing a purple t-shirt). For more information about the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program, contact Annette Pelegrin at pelegria@uwgb.edu or visit the program’s web site at www.uwgb.edu/watershed.