Reminder: UW-Green Bay Liberal Arts Essay Scholarship deadline is Monday, Mar. 18

The UW-Green Bay Office of the Provost is pleased to announce the third annual Liberal Arts Essay Scholarship Competition. This undergraduate essay competition aims to promote understanding of the purpose and value of a liberal arts and science education. The submission deadline is Monday, Mar. 18, 2019. Submissions must be sent electronically to the Provost’s Office c/o Clifton Ganyard at ganyardc@uwgb.edu; all essays must be attached as a PDF.

All essays will be judged by a group of UW-Green Bay faculty. Student essays selected as winners of the UW-Green Bay competition will receive a $500 scholarship to cover educational expenses at UW-Green Bay in 2019-2020. Recipients will be notified in spring 2019. This year’s competition is open to any UW-Green Bay undergraduate student in academic good standing and who plans to enroll at least half time for at least one semester during the 2018-2019 academic year.

This Year’s Topic: Universities have long been a venue where students and scholars seek to “sift and winnow” in pursuit of truth. Yet, recently the “death of facts” has been announced and the “age of post-truth” proclaimed. How does liberal arts education connect to the search for truth and how should it respond to how facts or truth are conceptualized in the broader culture, political and otherwise?

All submissions are to be original essays, 1,000-1,250 words in length, typed, double-spaced.  Each essay must include a title page with the following information:  title of essay, student’s name, major, home address, e-mail address, telephone number, and the following statement: “I hereby affirm that this is an original essay and my own work.”

Submission for Liberal Arts Essay Scholarship Competition is March 19

The UW-Green Bay Office of the Provost is holding the second annual Liberal Arts Essay Scholarship Competition. This undergraduate essay competition aims to promote the understanding of the purpose and value of a liberal arts and science education. Any UW-Green Bay undergraduate student in academic good standing and plans to enroll at least half time for at least one semester during the 2018-19 academic year is invited to submit an essay for the competition. The submission deadline is Monday, March 19 and must be sent electronically to the Provost’s Office c/o Clifton Lanyard at ganyardc@uwgb.edu; all essays must be attached as a PDF. Winners receive a $500 scholarship to cover educational expenses at UW-Green Bay in 2018-19. All submissions are to be original essays, 1,000 to 1,250 words in length, typed and double-spaced. Each essay must include a title page with the following information: title of essay, student’s name, major, home address, email address, telephone number and the following statement: “I hereby affirm that this is an original essay and my own work.” This year’s topic: In our age of big data, society is expanding its focus on metrics and measurement when it comes to public investment and decision making. However, many of the stated benefits of a liberal arts education defy measurement, especially in the short term. Discuss the benefits of a liberal arts education that, although not easily quantifiable, are essential contributions to a high-functioning society.

 

First annual Liberal Arts Essay Scholarship Competition

The UW-Green Bay Office of the Provost is sponsoring its first Liberal Arts Essay Scholarship Competition. This undergraduate essay competition aims to promote understanding of the purpose and value of a liberal arts and science education. The submission deadline is March 10 and must be sent electronically to the Provost’s Office c/o Clifton Ganyard at ganyardc@uwgb.edu. Winners receive a $500 scholarship to cover educational expenses at UWGB in 2017-18. The competition is open to any UW-Green Bay undergraduate student in academic good standing and who plans to enroll at least half time for at least one semester during the 2017-2018 academic year. All submissions are to be original essays, 1,000 to 1,250 words in length, typed and double-spaced. Each essay must include a title page with the following information: title of essay, student’s name, major, home address, e-mail address, telephone number, and the following statement: “I hereby affirm that this is an original essay and my own work.” This year’s topic: The legendary peace activist Mahatma Gandhi, a five-time Nobel Prize nominee, insisted that “you must be the change you wish to see in the world.” Nelson Mandela, a Nobel Prize winner, pointed to the importance of education in helping “you” bring about this change: “education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world.” With these two statements in mind, discuss how your liberal arts education is preparing you to be an effective agent of the change you wish to see in the world.

Winners of UW System Liberal Arts Essay Scholarship

UW System President Ray Cross has announced three undergraduate student winners of the annual UW System Liberal Arts Essay Scholarship Competition. This year’s essay prompt invited students to reflect on their own education in the context of the William Cronon essay, “Only Connect,” about the qualities that distinguish a liberally educated person.

The three honorees are:
· Bonny Bobka, UW-Whitewater, “A Liberal Character”
· Kristen Romes, UW-Madison, “Waive Your Flag”
· Nicholas Schefsky, UW-Sheboygan, “The Artist & The Engineer”

For a link to the winning essays.

Students Cortright, Scheunemann advance in liberal arts essay competition

Students Laura Cortright and Lyssa Scheunemann have been selected as UW-Green Bay’s finalists in the 9th annual Liberal Arts Essay Competition sponsored by SAGLA — the UW System’s “System Advisory Group on the Liberal Arts.” Each will receive a $500 scholarship for the Fall 2014 semester, and have her work entered into the pool of essays from across the UW System for the next level of competition. Cortright is a freshman Music major and 2013 graduate of Pulaski High School who plans a career in music education. Her topic was “Beauty’s Truth.” Scheunemann, a transfer student and Bay Port High School graduate, is a senior majoring in Biology. Her essay was titled “Nature vs. Nurture in Education.”

Their essays will be published in the Fall 2014 issue of the Sheepshead Review. Associate Provost Andy Kersten thanked Dean Scott Furlong and faculty members Kristin Vespia, Michelle McQuade Dewhirst and Aaron Weinschenk for serving on the review committee.

This year’s essay competition approached the writings of historian William Cronon and the ten qualities he believes distinguish a liberally educated person; students were asked to describe a moment from their recent educations when they had been most vividly aware of the importance of one of these qualities.