Kraft, Furlong publish fifth edition of popular Public Policy textbook

Michael Kraft, professor emeritus of Public and Environmental Affairs, and Scott Furlong, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, have just published the fifth edition of their book Public Policy: Politics, Analysis, and Alternatives, officially released on Nov. 4 by CQ Press to coincide with election day.

Kraft says the textbook reflects the way that he and Furlong long taught their courses in Public Policy Analysis and Introduction to Public Policy, respectively. The book encourages students to question assumptions and recognize how analysis and political arguments intersect, and to apply critical and creative thinking on issues ranging from the federal deficit to health care reform to climate change. Newly added content includes references to the ending of the war in Afghanistan, controversies over national security leaks and surveillance, energy policy and climate change, immigration, college costs and affordability, heightened concerns over inequality, and ongoing debates over the federal deficit and national deficit.

According to the publisher, the book ranks at the top among the nation’s best-selling public policy texts. A description of the book and editorial reviews of it can be found at the publisher’s website.

Next 360° Thursdays concert to feature improvisation of RDG Trio

UW-Green Bay Music will present the next event in its 360° Thursdays series, featuring the RDG Trio, at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 13 in Fort Howard Hall at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts.

The RDG Trio consists of UW-Green Bay alumnus Ryan Frane (piano), director of Jazz Studies at the University of Minnesota-Duluth; Greg Garrison (double bass), noted performer and recording artist; and David Schmalenberger (percussion), a faculty member at McNally Smith College of Music in St. Paul, Minn. The group will perform jazz that is highly improvisatory, taking the audience through the process by talking about the music before performing it and projecting the “lead sheets” for the audience to see as they perform.

Now in its second season, the 360° Thursdays concert series features a diversity of performance styles designed to broaden attendees’ horizons and deepen their understanding of music. A component of UW-Green Bay’s 360° of Learning approach, the concert-lecture event helps students, faculty, staff and community members connect with music in more meaningful ways. Performances feature scintillating and provocative pre-concert discussions by a composer, performer or arranger. Attendees will consider a single aspect of music through multiple perspectives.

Each 360° Thursdays performance takes place at 6:30 p.m. in Fort Howard Hall at the Weidner Center on campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive. Concerts are free but a $5 suggested donation is appreciated. More information about the series is available online. UW-Green Bay is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of music. More information about UW-Green Bay Music is available online, on Facebook and on Twitter.

#14-154

Psi Chi promotes ‘Mind vs. Brain’ dialog with Jeffreys, Lorenz, Martin

Student Chad Osteen of the campus chapter of Psi Chi, the honor society in psychology, invites faculty and staff to an interdisciplinary conversation on the topic “Mind vs. Brain.” The event will take place Monday, Nov. 10, from 5 to 6 p.m. in Room 208 of MAC Hall. Featured will be three faculty members – Psychology Prof. Dennis Lorenz of Human Development, Religious Studies Prof. Derek Jeffreys of Humanistic Studies and Philosophy Prof. Christopher Martin of Humanistic Studies – who will each share observations on the human condition from the perspective of their respective disciplines, followed by a joint question-and-answer period. Osteen says he hopes the event will help demonstrate to students how multiple disciplines can critically examine a topic and contribute to a more thorough understanding. The program is free and open to the public.
 

In the news: Medical College celebrates new satellite campus

Representatives from UW-Green Bay were on hand Thursday (Oct. 23) when the Medical College of Wisconsin-Green Bay unveiled its new digs during a media event at St. Norbert College. The debut of the satellite campus included a look at its classroom space, high-tech equipment and more. “We are very excited to be a community and university partner for MCW-Green Bay,” said UW-Green Bay Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences Scott Furlong, who attended the event. “Our faculty members are looking forward to the opportunities to teach within the program and share these interactions with our undergraduate student population.” Furthermore, Furlong said, the partnership will allow UW-Green Bay students to obtain a medical education right here in Northeastern Wisconsin, preparing them locally for successful careers. MCW-Green Bay will welcome its first cohort of 20 to 25 students beginning in July 2015. For more information and a few photos, check out our UW-Green Bay News post and a sampling of local news coverage:
UW-Green Bay News
Green Bay Press-Gazette
WBAY.com
fox11online.com

UW-Green Bay helps celebrate new home for Medical College of Wisconsin

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay was among the partners celebrating the new home of the Medical College of Wisconsin Green Bay (MCW-Green Bay) satellite campus at a media event Thursday, Oct. 23 on the St. Norbert College campus in De Pere.

“We are very excited to be a community and university partner for MCW-Green Bay,” said Scott Furlong, UW-Green Bay Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences. “Our faculty members are looking forward to the opportunities to teach within the program and share these interactions with our undergraduate student population.”

The partnership also provides opportunities for students who are seeking a medical education and wish to remain in Northeastern Wisconsin, said Furlong, who was on hand for Thursday’s event.

“Our Human Biology program has a strong reputation of preparing students for medical school and other medical careers,” he said. “UW-Green Bay is looking forward to other programmatic opportunities within the health care field that this partnership provides.”

MCW-Green Bay will host the first cohort of 20 to 25 students beginning in July of 2015. UW-Green Bay is a proud partner with a history of preparing pre-medical students within the Human Biology program, officials said. Among the distinguished UWGB alumni who also graduated from UWGB are Dr. Joe Carroll ‘97 and Dr. Marc Biedermann ’05.

Carroll co-directs the Medical College of Wisconsin’s Advanced Ocular Imaging Program and is an Associate Professor in the departments of Ophthalmology, Biophysics, and Cell Biology, Neurobiology and Anatomy. He was among the first to use a technology called adaptive optics to view the living retina at a cellular level, and he is credited with important breakthroughs in the study of color blindness. Carroll is a specialist in retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosis. He returned to UW-Green Bay to deliver the May 2014 commencement address.

Biedermann is an emergency medicine doctor in Portage, Wisconsin and is one of three doctors at Divine Savior Healthcare specializing in Emergency Medicine. Biedermann graduated from MCW in 2009 and completed his residency with the University of Wisconsin Emergency Medicine Residency

The MCW-Green Bay Campus will assist in the effort to overcome a shortage of Wisconsin physicians. About 400 new physicians graduate annually from Wisconsin’s two medical schools, MWC and the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine. More than 7,000 students already have applied to the MCW medical school for matriculation in August 2015. Seven hundred of the applicants are Wisconsin residents, 1,800 students have indicated an interest in attending MCW-Green Bay, and 67 Wisconsin-based applicants have indicated a preference in the MCW-Green Bay campus.

The MCW-Green Bay campus will give students looking to attend medical school another option that may better fit their lifestyle, officials say. “Learn. Live. Care. Cure.,” the MCW slogan, is supported by the design of the Green Bay campus. According to the MCW-Green Bay Campus Dean, Matthew Hunsaker, the state-of-the-art school model uses time more efficiently by eliminating a summer break and cuts down the cost of earning a medical degree for students.

More information about the Medical College of Wisconsin-Green Bay is available online

(Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)
 Medical College of Wisconsin-Green Bay holds open house, October 23, 2014   Medical College of Wisconsin-Green Bay holds open house, October 23, 2014  </a Medical College of Wisconsin-Green Bay holds open house, October 23, 2014   Medical College of Wisconsin-Green Bay holds open house, October 23, 2014   Medical College of Wisconsin-Green Bay holds open house, October 23, 2014
Photos by Sue Bodilly, Marketing and University Communication

Now seeking proposals for the next Common Theme


The UW-Green Bay Common Theme committee is requesting proposals for the 2015-16 academic year Common Theme. This year the committee is particularly interested in a theme that will help UW-Green Bay celebrate “50 Years of Excellence.” The theme should lend itself to interdisciplinary analysis and conversation, be of high academic caliber and conducive to scholarly dialogue, should lend itself to collaborative links across the campus (student affairs, academic affairs and community engagement), and be accessible, yet potentially engaging, for students and the community. You can find past common theme topics on the Common Theme website. Proposals are due on or before Sunday, Nov. 30, and should be submitted to Donna Ritch, Associate Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. If you have any questions regarding the Common Theme proposals, please contact Ritch or Brenda Amenson-Hill.

College kid makes good: Top doctor returns to serve region’s children

tina-top-storyAsk Dr. Tina Sauerhammer about the seminal moments in her life, and the answer may surprise you.

She won’t, as one might rightly expect, start with being part of the surgical team that performed the first-ever full face transplant in the United States in 2011. She’ll gloss over the fact that she entered college at 14, graduated at 18 and completed medical school at just 22. She might mention her tenure as Miss Wisconsin, but only because it allowed her to advocate for organ donation, a cause about which she remains deeply and personally passionate. Fortuitous opportunities, she’ll say. Right place, right time.

What she will point to is her May 2011 UW-Green Bay commencement speech, given just weeks after the groundbreaking transplant surgery at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

“I would say that one of the pinnacles of everything, was coming back to give that speech,” says Sauerhammer. “Even more so than the face transplant, because it felt like everything I had accomplished up to that point came full circle.”

If coming back to speak at commencement was one highlight, coming back for good may just be another — and not just for Sauerhammer. In June, Prevea Health announced it had hired her to become the first fellowship-trained pediatric plastic and reconstructive surgeon based in Northeastern Wisconsin. She began her practice at the end of September.

In its own way, it’s a notable free-agent signing for Titletown and one of its other signature industries, health care. Sauerhammer represents a welcome influx of talent, and she will build her fan base one family, one young patient at a time. She’s thrilled to be home — and eager to start making a difference.

“It’s kind of indescribable,” says Sauerhammer, who most recently was practicing in Washington, D.C. “I see parents who find out their child has a cleft lip and there’s so much that’s unknown for them. One of the most rewarding things is to be able to reassure parents and educate them about what we can do to improve their child’s quality of life.

“And their son or daughter will go on to live a normal life, just like any other child. … Once you operate on a child, they’re your patient for life.”

Sauerhammer’s pediatric plastic surgery work runs the gamut from repairing cleft lips and palates to working on dog bites, fixing congenital deformities, working with burn injuries, removing extra digits and much more. Having her back home in Green Bay is a tremendous boon for the area, says Dr. Ashok Rai, Prevea Health President and CEO.

“Dr. Sauerhammer is just one of a handful of physicians in the state to be as skilled as she is in the area of pediatric, plastic reconstructive surgery,” Rai observes. “Prevea is very fortunate that she has decided to come back home to Green Bay and join a health care organization that truly cares for this town.”

‘She fit in perfectly’
It’s a town Sauerhammer knows well, having been born and raised in Green Bay with a Midwest work ethic she still credits — along with her hardworking parents — with instilling the drive that helped her get where she is today. Sauerhammer attended Montessori school and completed her high school coursework at 14. From there, her options were to go on to regular high school, attend a preparatory school out east or head right to college. Knowing she wanted to be a doctor, and knowing how much schooling that would take, she chose the third option — attending UW-Green Bay would allow her to live at home while she navigated life as the University’s youngest-ever undergrad.

Sauerhammer’s enrollment raised some eyebrows — even some of her friends, she said, questioned her decision and told her she wouldn’t make it. The University asked Associate Prof. Donna Ritch — now the Associate Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences — to keep an eye on Sauerhammer, and make sure she was adjusting OK.

Sitting in her office in Theatre Hall, Ritch recalls checking in on Sauerhammer while she was taking a summer biology course before her first full semester.

“She and the other students were out in the hall — they must have had a break in lab,” Ritch said. “And she was just talking away to them. I went back to my office and said ‘there’s no worries there.’ She fit in. She fit in perfectly.”

That initial interaction would form the basis for a mentorship and friendship that persists today. It would be a few years before Sauerhammer had Ritch as a professor, and by that point the pair had become close friends.

“She’s always there for you, motivating you and helping you attain your goals,” Sauerhammer said. “She was awesome as a professor, but whenever I think about Dr. Ritch — she was my mentor and pre-med adviser.

I wouldn’t be where I am today without her.”

Nor, Sauerhammer said, would she be where she is without UW-Green Bay. The moderate campus size was just right for a teenager who had never even attended a traditional high school, and the relationships she formed — especially with Ritch, but also with other professors — are, for her, truly what sets the University apart.

“All of my professors… I probably remember every single one of my professors’ names to this day,” she said, “and I don’t think a lot of people can say that about their school. I always
reference Dr. Ritch because we have such a special relationship, but that being said, every single teacher has touched me or molded me in some way.”

Sauerhammer’s age was never an issue, Ritch recalls — many people knew how young she was, but with her academic and social skills she was, in many ways, just like any other student. That is, until it came time to take her driver’s test.

“I had a Physics quiz,” Sauerhammer says, laughing. “I had to ask Dr. Fischbach if I could be excused from a Physics quiz. And he said, ‘sure — but just don’t take a left turn.’ And I passed.”

Heartbreaking loss … and a new opportunity
UW-Green Bay’s youngest graduate ever in 1999, Sauerhammer enrolled in medical school at UW-Madison. On commencement day four years later, she again claimed the “youngest ever” distinction, this time at a place with a 100-year tradition.

Always focused on her goal of becoming a doctor and working with children, she did experience one change of heart. She was following a track toward general pediatrics until a surgery rotation during her third year of med school changed her mind. Sauerhammer started a general surgery residency that included a rotation in plastic surgery.

“I saw my first cleft lip repair and I just completely fell in love with it,” she said. “I got to work with kids and do surgery, but these kids were for the most part healthy. And it was very technical — but the other part about pediatric plastic surgery that I loved is that not only can you help children locally, but you can go on mission trips and provide these services to children in other countries.”

Sauerhammer was in Madison for about a decade before departing for the east coast. And although she had happily discovered her passion by the time she left Wisconsin, the journey was not without its challenges. When she was a fourth-year medical student, her father, Randy, died from complications of a rare autoimmune illness called Wegener’s disease. He was on the wait list for a kidney transplant that could have saved his life.

She wanted to quit — but her mother, Oki, insisted she stay the course. It’s what her father would have wanted, she said. So Sauerhammer finished medical school — but wasn’t yet emotionally ready to continue with her training.

So she took a year off before starting her residency in general surgery — and won the title of Miss Wisconsin 2003.

“My main goal that entire year was to promote organ and tissue donation,” she said, “so that’s what led me to Miss Wisconsin. But that year, I grew as a person. It’s made me a better physician, being able to interact with people from all walks of life, and to promote something that I felt very strongly about.

“And that has really opened so many doors, too. All of that, I attribute to my father.”

A community ‘that means so much to me’
Sauerhammer relished her time living and working out east, but soon, she found home was calling — both personally and professionally.

“I feel it is important to leave and get those experiences and training,” she said, “and the best thing I can do is bring everything that I’ve learned back home, and share it with the community that means so much to me.”

She’s had a great time getting reacquainted with that community, spending time with her mom, hitting up the Green Bay Farmer’s Market, taking in a Green Bay Packers game — and even, she says with a smile, running into people who were friends with her dad. When she sat down in her office for a September interview with UW-Green Bay’s Inside magazine, she was still in the process of unpacking — and more nervous about navigating the building and learning the computer system than starting her practice and meeting her first patients. For that, she couldn’t wait.

Sauerhammer’s affable manner comes through immediately — despite her accomplishments, she is humble and friendly. Again, Randy and Oki get the credit.

“My dad worked at a paper mill; my mom is a seamstress,” she said. “I didn’t grow up with much but what little my parents had, they always wanted to make sure I had the best education.

“My mom always tells me, ‘dreams are not free.’ You can have goals, but you have to work hard to achieve those goals. And with my Green Bay upbringing — that’s why I am the way I am. I wasn’t given everything and I appreciate the hard work it takes to achieve those goals.”

Her goal now? To give back — and to ensure that for the first time, children in Northeastern Wisconsin have access to the kind of care she can provide. And to reconnect with the places that gave Sauerhammer her start.

“I owe everything I have to this day (to) my education at UWGB,” she said. “I literally would not be where I am today without it.

“I owe so much — and I just want to give back, not only to the community of Green Bay, but also to UWGB.” — Kelly Moore

UW-Green Bay Music to present Chorale, Concert Choir Oct. 21

UW-Green Bay’s Chorale and Concert Choir will take the stage at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21, in a concert featuring the UW-Green Bay Vocal Jazz Ensemble as the groups’ special guest.

The concert, which will be held in the Cofrin Family (main) Hall of the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts, will feature UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Randall A. Meder conducting the Chorale and Concert Choir, and UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. John Salerno as director of the Vocal Jazz Ensemble.

The Concert Choir will perform first, presenting selections that include “Exultate Justi” (Lodovico Viadana), “Sure On This Shining Night” (Samuel Barber) and “Oliver Cromwell” (Benjamin Britten). Just before intermission, the Vocal Jazz Ensemble will take the stage, performing “I’m Gone” (Alison Krauss, arr. John Salerno).

Following a brief intermission, the UW-Green Bay Chorale will perform. The group will start out with “Or sus, serviteurs, du Seigneur” (J.P. Sweelinck) and will continue with pieces including “Madrigal, Op. 35” (Gabriel Fauré) and “Zigeunerlieder, Op. 103” (Johannes Brahms).

Tickets for the Oct. 21 concert are $7 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. Call (920) 465-2400 or visit www.uwgb.edu/tickets. UW-Green Bay is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu/music.

UW-Green Bay Concert Choir personnel are as follows: Soprano: Emily Ahrens, Natasha Ales, McKenna Bertrand, Abigail Borchardt, Felicia Bunnell, Colleen Burkhart, Maria Gerrits, Emily Gluck, Kirsten Just, Claire Kitzerow, Brittany Kloida, Brittney Koerner, Sabrena Koren, Cassandra Kremer, Andrea Kuhlow, Xinyi Liu, Haley Pankratz, Sarah Seifert, Marisa Slempkes, Marissa Weibel; Alto: Anna Behnke, Grace Callen, Renee Cowles, Macie Doyle, Kesekokiw Grignon, Samantha Gulino, Maren Hoewisch, Halle Johnson, Brigitta Kaiser, Emily Kunst, Lindsey Lewis, Jordan Parbs, Lauren Paul, Kelsey Peterson, Elizabeth Punke, Sydney St. Clair, Brooke Theama, Samantha Zingsheim; Tenor: Milton Byers, Matthias Clarey, Austin Ernst, Steven Henderson, Logan Witthuhn, Blong Xiong, Gabriel Zastrow; Bass: Maxwell Ethridge, Jacob Huempfner, Jonathan Marcell, Cody Penkwitz, Nicholas Schommer, Thomas Sielaff.

UW-Green Bay Vocal Jazz personnel are as follows: Cassie Alfheim, Anna Behnke, Laura Cortright, Nikita Cantable, Ashley Gutting, Michaela Hogan, Brittney Koerner, Heather Roberts, Tori Schuurmans, Victoria Schwenn, Sydney St. Clair, Ryan Dummer, Logan Gruszynski, Derek Olson, Nicholas Schommer, Jack Van Beek.

UW-Green Bay Chorale personnel are as follows: Soprano: Lindsey Buss, Angela Danowski, Anna Hoesley, Michaela Hogan, Tori Schuurmans, Ashley Thibeau, Madelyn Winter; Alto: Alysha Brooks, Laura Cortright, Ashley Gutting, Kelsie Holtzheimer, Danielle LaPorte, Rissel Peguero, Lydia Schneider, Victoria Schwenn, Brittany Welch; Tenor: Cody Finer, Logan Gruszynski, James Letellier, Lane Ludtke; Bass: Evan Ash, Ryan Dummer, Bryan Konicek, Nicholas Schommer, Kevin Wellens.

#14-144

UW-Green Bay Music presents Wind Ensemble, Symphonic Band concert

UW-Green Bay Music will present a Wind Ensemble and Symphonic Band concert featuring a special guest artist at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 18 in the Cofrin Family (main) Hall of the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts.

Conducted by UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Kevin Collins, the groups will be joined by guest artist Jeffrey Benedict, Professor Emeritus of Music at Cal State Los Angeles. Benedict, who still teaches at Cal State, has played professionally since 1972 and is highly regarded as both a jazz and classical saxophone performer and teacher. He has two jazz albums, numerous new works, a host of performance credits and many awards to his credit.

The UW-Green Bay Symphonic Band will perform first during the Oct. 18 show, kicking off with “A Tribute to Grainger” by Percy Aldridge Grainger. The group will then play “Suite Provencale” (Jan Van der Roost) and conclude with “Kirkpatrick Fanfare” (Andrew Boysen Jr.).

Following a brief intermission, the Wind Ensemble will take the stage, beginning with a performance of “The Star Spangled Banner.” The ensemble will play “Xerxes”” (John Mackey) and “First Suite in E flat Op. 28 No. 1” (Gustav Holst) before concluding with “ ‘Taxim’ from Ode to Lord Buckley” (David Amram). Benedict will be the featured artist for the ensemble’s final piece.

Tickets for the Wind Ensemble and Symphonic Band concert are $7 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. Call (920) 465-2400 or visit www.uwgb.edu/tickets. UW-Green Bay is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu/music.

Symphonic Band personnel are as follows: Flute: Beth Waldek, Allie Andres, Morgan Moe, Jennifer Lund, Emma Fay; Clarinet: Kennedy Kleingartner, Amelia Ford, Brianna Bodoh, Haley Jensson, Barbara Boyer, Mikayla Becherer, Jennifer Bahling; Bass Clarinet: Veronica Kasperek; Alto Saxophone: Alyssa Edges, Kevin Cervantes, Alycia Winters, Sheng Lor; Tenor Saxophone: Erica Hilbert, Amanda Dunn; Baritone Saxophone: Kyle Schneider; Horn: Michaela Moore, Kathi Arnold, Katrina Weber, Alysha Brooks, Andrew Sturm; Trumpet: Austin Ernst, Sam Osterberg, Evan Patton, Talor Sohr; Trombone: Matthew Albert, Nathan Marhefke, Joe Russett; Euphonium: Haley Jensson; Tuba: James Jones; Percussion: Isaiah Hernandez, Bruce Mckinney; Violoncello: Larissa Mickelson; String Bass: Jon Tabers-Kwak.

Wind Ensemble personnel are as follows: Flute: Payton Kronforst, Kailey Mucha (picc.), Laura Cortright, Alysha Brooks, Ashley Gutting; Clarinet: Lauren Paul, Rebekah Erdman, Heather Roberts, Kait Francois; Alto Saxophone: McKenna VanDerLeest, Kyle Hall, Kelton Jennings; Tenor Saxophone: Matt Hayes; Baritone Saxophone: Kyle Henrickson; Horn: Brandt Bailey, Molly Dederich, Shannon Swodzinski, Michaela Moore; Trumpet: Ryan Loining, James Block, Sam Osterberg, Mitchell Kanlasty; Trombone: Matthew Albert, Jacob Harper, Mallory Krueger; Bass Trombone: Alec Hasse; Euphonium: Cole Watkins, Paul Dugan; Tuba: Joe Russett, Tom Sielaff; Percussion: Lisa Ford, Jamie Rodgers, Jack VanBeek, Bobby Jo Majers, Kyle Sweeney, Michaela Hogan; String Bass: Jon Tabers-Kwak; Piano/Keyboard: Nicholas Saldaña.

#14-143

Next 360° Thursdays concert to focus on music of Latin America

UW-Green Bay Music will present “Contemporary Voices from Latin America,” the next installment in its 360° Thursdays lecture-concert series, at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 16 in Fort Howard Hall at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts.

The event will feature violinist Francesca Anderegg and pianist Esther Wang, who will explore the rich offerings of Latin American composers that encompass both folkloric and modernist styles of music. The concert will consider a global variety of influences as seen through the perspective of Latin American composers. Noted Venezuelan composer Reinaldo Moya will join the pair for this lecture-recital showing the diversity of styles in contemporary Latin American music. They will close the concert with the influences of Venezuelan folk music and American minimalism combined in Moya’s Imagined Archipelagos.

Now in its second season, the 360° Thursdays concert series features a diversity of performance styles designed to broaden attendees’ horizons and deepen their understanding of music. A component of UW-Green Bay’s 360° of Learning approach, the concert-lecture event helps students, faculty, staff and community members connect with music in more meaningful ways. Performances feature scintillating and provocative pre-concert discussions by a composer, performer or arranger. Attendees will consider a single aspect of music through multiple perspectives.

Each 360° Thursdays performance takes place at 6:30 p.m. in Fort Howard Hall at the Weidner Center on campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive. Concerts are free but a $5 suggested donation is appreciated. More information about the series is available online. UW-Green Bay is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of music. More information about UW-Green Bay Music is available online, on Facebook and on Twitter.

#14-139