Meyer’s turn for ‘Last Lecture’

Associate professor and UW-Green Bay’s Secretary of Faculty and Academic Staff Steve Meyer is the next speaker in UW-Green Bay’s “Last Lecture Series” line-up. Meyer will present, “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 23. The Last Lecture Series is part of UWGB’s 50th Anniversary celebration. Each month a UW-Green Bay faculty member is chosen to give a public presentation on a topic of his or her choice under the premise that it’s their last. Lectures take place in the University Union’s Christie Theatre, at 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay and are free open to the public. For more, see the press release.

 

UW-Green Bay Associate Professor Steve Meyer March Presenter in ‘Last Lecture’ Series

GREEN BAY – Associate professor Steve Meyer is the second to last speaker in the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s “Last Lecture Series” line-up. Meyer will present, “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 27.

The Last Lecture Series is part of UWGB’s 50th Anniversary celebration. Each month a UW-Green Bay faculty member is chosen to give a public presentation on a topic of his or her choice under the premise that it’s their last. Lectures take place in the University Union’s Christie Theatre, at 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay and are free open to the public.

“I watched Randy Pausch’s Last Lecture online and was very moved by what he had to say,” Meyer said in regards as to why he chose his topic. “Several years ago when UWGB’s Residence Hall programmers asked me to present a Last Lecture, I thought long and hard about what I would present. It would definitely not be anything related to my academic background – in the end any knowledge I’ve gained about meteorology and climatology isn’t going to change anybody’s life or way of thinking. Like Randy Pausch, I want to leave behind a message that I believe will help people put life into perspective. To cause them to think about what they will do with the years they have left, and to be thankful for all they have experienced throughout their years.”

Meyer has been a professor at UW-Green Bay since 2001. He received his Bachelor’s at Northern Illinois University, and both his Master’s and Ph.D. at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln. He teaches courses in the Natural and Applied Sciences department. He was a FOCUS Co-director for 8 years, has twice served as chair of the University Committee and recently became the Secretary of the Faculty and Staff.

The following is the remaining Last Lecture:

  • April 13 – Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science, “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit.”

Arendt’s Last Lecture hits to the heart of American values

“Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness” were key values according to our Founders. So what would they think, then, of our 24/7 work schedules, the outsized value we place upon work and material consumption today, and the fear that drives many to acquiesce to organizational demands that run counter to their own values and needs? Have our individual rights and freedoms been sacrificed to the organizational value system? These questions were explored by Prof. Lucy Arendt in her “Last Lecture.” Unlike the past 50th Anniversary Last Lectures, hers will not be readily available on video. PBS is broadcasting the presentation at a future date. Read more and see a few photos.

Arendt’s lecture hits at the heart of America’s values, long ago and today

“Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness” were key values according to our country’s founders. So what would they think, then, of our 24/7 work schedules, the outsized value we place upon work and material consumption today, and the fear that drives many to acquiesce to organizational demands that run counter to their own values and needs? Have our individual rights and freedoms been sacrificed to the organizational value system.”

These were a few of the questions explored by Austin E. Cofrin School of Business Professor Lucy Arendt on Wednesday to a packed house of UW-Green Bay students, faculty members, staff and community members. One of her areas of expertise lies in understanding how leaders within organizations make their decisions as well as the consequences of those decisions, on both the organization and the individuals who work within it. Her lecture, title “Made to Serve: The Tragic corruption of America’s Founding Values,” spoke to a trend she says she has seen through her research on the subversion of individual rights and freedoms to organizational goals, including profit.

Arendt’s lecture was the fourth of six in a series featuring UW-Green Bay professors giving capstone lectures on topics in their area. The Last Lecture Series was created as part of UW-Green Bay’s 50th anniversary. Arendt’s lecture was also the first in the series to be filmed by PBS for the University Place  program. When production is complete in a few months, Arendt’s lecture will be featured on The Wisconsin Channel of PBS as well as located in the online University Place lectures archive. UW-Green Bay will provide links to the lecture at that time.

Coming up in the Last Lecture series:

  • March 23 — Steve Meyer, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences
    “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s”
  • April 13 — Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science
    “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit.”

Past lectures

Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.
Lucy Arendt Last Lecture 2-17-16

– Photos by Kayla Ermer, Marketing and University Communication Student Intern

Reminder: Arendt gives Last Lecture Wednesday evening

Business faculty member and Associate Dean Lucy Arendt will present “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, February 17 in the Christie Theatre on the UWGB campus. The presentation — one in a number of  “50th Anniversary Last Lectures” — is free and open to the public. More on her topic here.

Lucy Arendt gives ‘Last Lecture’ this week

Business faculty member and Associate Dean Lucy Arendt will present “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values,” at 7 p.m. this Wednesday, February 17 in the Christie Theatre on the UWGB campus. The presentation — one in a number of  “50th Anniversary Last Lectures” — is free and open to the public. More on her topic here.

Lucy Arendt to be the next ‘Last Lecture’ series speaker

GREEN BAY – Associate Dean Lucy Arendt is the fourth speaker in the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s “Last Lecture Series” line-up, and the first this semester. Arendt will present, “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, February 17.

The Last Lecture Series is part of the celebration of UWGB’s 50th Anniversary. Each month of the fall and spring semesters, a UW-Green Bay faculty member is chosen to give a public presentation on a topic of his or her choice. They are to convey what lecture they would give if it were to be their last. The monthly lectures take place in the University Union’s Christie Theatre, at 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay. The lectures are free and open to the public.

“I think it has become an untested assumption that individual people should give up their rights in order to be employed, and I view this as a serious threat to our nation and to the health and well-being of all individuals,” Arendt said regarding her reason for choosing this topic. “I think that organizations have steadily eroded our collective sense of individualism and responsibility through their relentless focus on bureaucratization. I believe that universities have a special obligation to reverse this disturbing trend. What we need is a shared understanding of this threat and a call to action by faculty, staff, and students — all of whom should and must have a strong sense of ownership and voice in what universities and their communities do.”

Photo: Prof. Lucy Arendt
Lucy Arendt

Arendt has been a professor at UW-Green Bay for 10 years. She received both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees at UW-Green Bay, and a Ph.D. from UW-Milwaukee. She teaches courses in the Business Administration and the Sustainable Management programs. The published author has articles in the Journal of Academy of Business and Economics, Earthquake SPECTRA, and Journal of Leadership and Organization Studies, among others. She has also co-authored books about natural disasters and recovery.

The following are the remaining “Last Lectures:”

  • March 23 – Steve Meyer, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences, “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s”
  • April 13 – Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science, “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit.”

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UW-Green Bay presents Susan Gallagher-Lepak for the “Last Lecture Series”

Prof. Susan Gallagher-Lepak is the third speaker in the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s “Last Lecture Series” line-up. Gallagher-Lepak will present, “E-learning: The Train has Left the Station,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, November 18.

The Last Lecture Series is part of the celebration of UWGB’s 50th Anniversary. Each month of the fall and spring semesters, a UW-Green Bay faculty is chosen to give a public presentation on a topic of his or her choice. They are to convey what lecture they would give if it was to be their last. The monthly lectures take place in the University Union’s Christie Theatre, at 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay. The lectures are free and open to the public.

“Higher education has changed dramatically since UW-Green Bay began in 1965,” Gallagher-Lepak says, as to why she chose this topic. “A major transformation has been the introduction and growth of e-learning. E-Learning is ubiquitous and a desired format for many learners. It allows for anytime/anywhere learning. As a faculty member heavily involved in teaching online courses, I have a perspective to share about why I ‘jumped on the train.’ “

Her lecture will focus on several pivotal e-learning influences that have shaped her thinking and application of e-learning. The lecture will specifically address the questions:

  1. What is e-learning? How much e-learning is going on?
  2. What influences and experiences led me (and excited me) to teach online courses?
  3. What’s ahead for e-learning in higher education (includes some areas we need to be concerned about)

Gallagher-Lepak is both a licensed psychologist and a registered nurse for the State of Wisconsin. She has been an instructor at UW-Green Bay since 2003, and was promoted to full professor in 2015. She serves as both Chair and Director of the UWGB’s Nursing program. She earned a B.S. in Nursing from Marquette University, a Master of Science in Nursing from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and a Ph.D. for Rehabilitation Counseling Psychology with a minor in Educational Psychology from University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The following are the remaining Last Lectures:

  • Feb. 17- Lucy Arendt, Associate Dean, College of Professional Studies, “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values”
  • March 23- Steve Meyer, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences, “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s”
  • April 13- Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science, “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit.”

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