A basketball movie tonight at UW-Green Bay

As part of “Native American Cinema” week, the Intertribal Student Council is inviting campus and community to the Monday night (March 4) showing of the film Edge of America at 7 p.m. in the Union’s Christie Theatre. One of the stars, actress DeLanna Studi, is visiting campus and will take part in a discussion. Based on a true story, Edge of America depicts the journey of a high school women’s basketball team on the Three Nations Reservation from a collection of struggling individuals into a contender and source of community pride. UW-Green Bay faculty member JP Leary says he thinks audiences will enjoy the film. (The fact it’s a basketball story being shown in March at the home of the Phoenix is a bonus.) More on Native cinema events.

‘Native American Cinema’ project brings actress, film, workshops to campus

A focus on Native American cinema with film screenings and discussions, an introductory workshop to encourage prospective professionals, and a weeklong residency by prominent Cherokee actress DeLanna Studi are among the highlights of “Native American Cinema: A New Storytelling Tradition.” Activities take place at various Green Bay area locations Saturday, March 2, through Friday, March 8. UW-Green Bay is a co-host of the project along with the Green Bay Film Festival and the local American Indian Film Society. We’ll have more details including the list of special events in our next issue. See news release.

Wisconsin Humanities Council grant boosts interdisciplinary project
The “Native American Cinema” project is funded in part by a $10,000 grant from the Wisconsin Humanities Council’s Greater Green Bay Area Humanities Fund, with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The grant arose from a distinctly interdisciplinary collaboration. The project’s director, Prof. JP Leary, notes that the Green Bay Film Festival approached him last year for support in creating a track of Native films for the March 2013 festival. Michelle Danforth and Cyndee Sweetland asked him to assist with applying for the humanities council grant. Another supporter was Prof. David Coury, a Film Festival board member who also directs the Green Bay Film Society and was interested in bringing a full-length Native film to that series. At the same time, educator Norbert Hill of Oneida was looking to establish a Native film society locally. In addition, students with UW-Green Bay’s Intertribal Student Council were interested in scheduling a follow-up to their successful fall 2012 screening of the film Crooked Arrows. The strong local interest led Leary, who knew Studi through her work as an actress and advocate, to approach her about a possible residency in Green Bay.
 

Pow Wow will return in April

The event returned to campus last spring after a hiatus of several years. We’re glad to report that plans for the 2013 edition have firmed up to the point that the Intertribal Student Council is encouraging us to mark our calendars for Saturday, April 13, 2013, and the 16th University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Pow Wow, to be held again at the Kress Events Center. Details to come, closer to the event.
 

With Pow Wow, a visitor-filled Saturday for UW-Green Bay

Just a reminder: Saturday, April 14 also marks the return of the ceremonial Pow Wow organized by the Intertribal Student Council. Hundreds of visitors, if not more, are expected throughout the day. Debra Rezac, diversity director for the AIC, told a campus gathering earlier this week “the interest has been overwhelming” and “we are certain of a great turnout,” especially for the first Grand Entry at 1 p.m. The Pow Wow will be headquartered in the “old gyms” while National History Day will take place on the opposite side of the Kress. (Although History Day has something like 400 young presenters, if you factor in friends and family coming out to view the exhibits, the number is much higher.)

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And that’s not all! — Jeff Krueger, operations manager for the Kress, reminds us that there’s an NCAA Division I softball doubleheader going on that day, too. It’s the Phoenix home opener with games vs. Butler scheduled for 1 and 3 p.m. So, stop out for a little history, culture and sports… and probably a full parking lot or two, which is great.

Return of Pow Wow brings togetherness, tradition for campus and community

UW-Green Bay Pow WowFor UW-Green Bay senior Luanne Funmaker, a Pow Wow is all about a sense of togetherness.

The Psychology and First Nations Studies major, who is Oneida and Ho-Chunk, grew up attending Pow Wows and is eager to share the experience with attendees both veteran and new. She’ll get that chance on Saturday, April 14, when UW-Green Bay revives its community Pow Wow, a popular tradition now returning after a several-year hiatus.

“For me, it really means a sense of community, for not only the UWGB campus, but also the surrounding communities,” Funmaker said. “Some people look at it as a ceremony, some people look at it as a gathering — so in the end, it really reminds me of community, and bringing together the surrounding tribes.”

UW-Green Bay Pow Wow

The 2012 UW-Green Bay Pow Wow, with its theme of “Honoring the Ones Who Came Before Us,” will take place from 1-9 p.m. April 14 at the Kress Events Center on campus. Grand Entries — “by far the best time to come to a Pow Wow,” Funmaker says — are scheduled for 1 and 7 p.m.

Funmaker, a member of the UW-Green Bay Intertribal Student Council and part of the Pow Wow planning committee, said the group is thrilled to be welcoming popular Host Drum Bear Creek. Other invited drums include Smokeytown, Young Firekeepers, Ho-Chunk Station and Chief Hill.

UW-Green Bay Pow Wow“The Host Drum that we’re bringing in is pretty well known — they’re Bear Creek,” Funmaker said. “So people from all around the country will be coming — they have a very good following, because people love their music.”

A Pow Wow feast featuring such traditional food as wild rice casserole and fry bread will be served from 5-5:30 p.m. at the nearby Mauthe Center, just across the parking lot from the Kress Center. The events are free and open to the public.

Planning for the Pow Wow’s return began last year, and the Intertribal Student Council has been working diligently to prepare for the large-scale event ever since. Committee members were new to the Pow Wow planning process, but the stress and uncertainty are turning to excitement as the event approaches, Funmaker said. In addition to the music, dancing and food, the UW-Green Bay Pow Wow will feature a variety of Native American vendors.

Organizers are encouraging anyone with an interest to attend the April 14 event, whether they’ve previously experienced a Pow Wow or not.

“It’s a great educational opportunity,” Funmaker said, “because a lot of nonnatives and a lot of students and faculty are going to be there that have never been to a Pow Wow before — some that have, some that have gone their entire lives. So it’s a really interesting opportunity for people.”

UW-Green Bay Pow Wow

It’s a similar message to the one Funmaker had for Jose Villa, a sophomore transfer student whom she recruited for the Intertribal Student Council and Pow Wow planning committee. Villa, who is Hispanic, said he hadn’t considered joining the groups — but Funmaker’s entreaty changed his mind. He hopes it will do likewise for potential Pow Wow attendees.

“The only thing that divides us,” she told him, “is a barrier that we didn’t put there.”

– The photos above are from archives, Pow Wow at Phoenix Sports Center, 2007

UW-Green Bay to host community Pow Wow at Kress Events Center April 14

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay will revive a popular traditional event Saturday, April 14, when it hosts the UW-Green Bay Pow Wow at the Kress Events Center on campus.

Long a University staple, the Pow Wow is returning after a several-year break with the theme “Honoring the Ones Who Came Before Us.” The event was a fixture at the old Phoenix Sports Center for nearly two decades, but has been on hiatus for various reasons.

This year’s Pow Wow will run from 1-9 p.m., with Grand Entrances scheduled for 1 and 7 p.m. at the Kress Events Center. A Pow Wow feast featuring such traditional food as wild rice casserole and fry bread will be served from 5-5:30 p.m. at the nearby Mauthe Center, just across the parking lot from the Kress. The events are free and open to the public.

UW-Green Bay’s Intertribal Student Council is thrilled to be reviving the event, one highlight of which will be the well-known Host Drum Bear Creek, said senior Luanne Funmaker, a member of the Intertribal Student Council and the Pow Wow planning committee. Other invited drums include Smokeytown, Young Firekeepers, Ho-Chunk Station and Chief Hill. Dan King will serve as emcee for the event, while John Teller Jr. is the arena director. The male head dancer is Alan Caldwell, and the female head dancer is Connie Danforth.

“For me, it really means a sense of community, for not only the UWGB campus, but also the surrounding communities,” Funmaker said. “Some people look at it as a ceremony, some people look at it as a gathering — so in the end, it really reminds me of community, and bringing together the surrounding tribes.”

In addition to the music, dancing and food, the UW-Green Bay Pow Wow will feature a variety of Native American vendors. Event cosponsors are UW-Green Bay’s Organizacion Latino America, Office of the Provost, Diversity Task Force, Good Times Programming, Alumni, Office of Student Life, Democracy and Justice Studies, Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Adult Degree Program. For more information, contact Deborah Rezac at (920) 465-2720 or rezacd@uwgb.edu.

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Intertribal Student Council’s frybread-and-bake-sale fundraiser

UW-Green Bay’s Intertribal Student Council is promoting a fundraiser for to help raise money for a member of SmokeyTown drum. One of the members had a heart attack last week and the Pyawasit family could use any help with expenses of travel and medical. The SmokeyTown drummers are well known in these parts and along the Pow Wow trail nationally. The Frybread and Bake Sale will take place next Friday (March 2) from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the University Union near the bookstore. Deborah Rezac of the AIC is a contact for more information at rezacd@uwgb.edu.

Intertribal Student Council, AIC present ‘Bittersweet Winds’ through Thursday

The Intertribal Student Council and the American Intercultural Center would like to invite the campus community to stop by Phoenix Room B in the University Union today through Thursday (Nov. 15-17) to check out the Bittersweet Winds Exhibit, which features negative and positive images of Native people. The exhibit contains many images of the propaganda that permeated this country in order to maintain various negative attitudes towards Native Americans. Throughout the day on Tuesday and Wednesday, there will be video presentations, such as Reel Injun and Government Schools, with related discussion. At 6 p.m. Wednesday (Nov. 16), Wade Fernandez, an award-winning Native artist, will present a special concert. The Intertribal Student Council will be selling fry bread and Indian tacos for a fundraiser from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday. Cost is $5 for an Indian taco, $3 for a piece of fry bread or $5 for two pieces. More information.

And get your fry bread while you’re at it

Also on Nov. 16, student members of the Intertribal Student Council will be selling traditional Native fry bread from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. in the Phoenix Rooms of the Union. This tasty treat is just $3 a piece or two for $5, with toppings including butter, peanut butter, jelly and powdered sugar. Funds raised go toward Native American education and initiatives.