UW-Green Bay associate lecturer Frost to moderate author discussion

Green Bay native and author Mark Rader will present his newly published first novel, The Wanting Life, on Friday, March 6, 2020, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Lions Mouth Book Store, 401 South Washington Street, Green Bay. Critics have called the novel “deeply complex and compulsively readable” and “a master class of the human heart.” Pulitzer-Prize winning author Richard Russo called the book “a profound meditation on what we owe others and also ourselves,” and Booklist gave it a starred review, saying “With indelible images, exquisite emotional nuance and genuine wisdom, Rader explores faith, regret, shame, fear and, most of all, love.” The book was published last week. Rader has taught creative writing at Cornell, Northeastern University, Grub Street and the University of Chicago’s Graham School. The discussion moderator will be Susan Frost, UW-Green Bay associate lecturer (Humanities).

New episode of Canonball Podcast

In the latest episode of Canonball, UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Chuck Rybak (English and Humanistic Studies) and Prof. Ryan Martin (Psychology), talk with Prof. David Coury (Humanistic Studies and Global Studies) about Inception. Listen here. Canonball is a podcast out of Phoenix Studios at UW-Green Bay that covers the great works from a variety of disciplines. From movies to film to literature to video games, hosts Chuck Rybak and Ryan Martin discuss all things canonical.

Reminder: You are invited to Philosopher’s Cafe, Feb. 12, 7 to 9 p.m.

College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences invites you to the Philosopher’s Café Series. The series begins on Feb. 12, 2020 from 7 to 9 p.m. at St. Brendan’s Inn (Downtown Green Bay) with a discussion on Racial Ethics. A student of philosophy, critical race theory and black theology, Domonique Turnipseed, recently moved from the deep south to the most segregated city in America to pursue his Ph.D. at Marquette University. Join us as he leads a conversation about the philosophy of race and ethnicity. Philosopher’s Cafés are public forums held at local coffee shops and pubs in which community members engage in open, friendly and respectful dialogue in a relaxed and informal setting. It’s free and open to the public.

Canonball Episode 8: Prequel to Inception

In this Canonball mini-episode, UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. and Dean of CAHSS Chuck Rybak (English and Humanities) and Associate Dean for CAHSS Ryan Martin talk about their most recent episode on Dr. Seuss and discuss some modern great works they have been enjoying. Plus, Martin quizzes Rybak with trivia on great works from the 80s. Canonball is a podcast out of UW-Green Bay’s Phoenix Studios, which covers the great works from a variety of disciplines. From movies to film to literature to video games, hosts Chuck Rybak and Ryan Martin discuss all things canonical.

Faculty note: Emeritus faculty member Brian Sutton to receive staged reading

The play “Hypothetically Speaking,” a 10-minute rom-com by UW-Green Bay emeritus faculty member Brian Sutton (Humanities), will receive a staged reading by City Theatre of Miami, FL, as part of a Valentine’s Day-themed program on Friday, February 7. City Theatre bills itself as “the only theatre in the U.S. solely dedicated to the creation and production of ten-minute plays year-round,” and its Summer Shorts festival is perhaps the leading national festival for 10-minute plays. Sutton has submitted “Hypothetically Speaking” to the Summer Shorts festival, and he hopes that the Feb. 7 reading leads to a festival production. His musical comedy Searching for Romeo traveled a similar route, receiving a staged reading at the New York Musical Festival before landing a full production there.

And what about Sutton’s musical, “Searching for Romeo?” He says it continues to have a (faint) pulse. Last March a musical theatre workshop class at Marymount Manhattan college used it for a class project, giving it a third sort-of production in NYC. And on Jan. 9, 2020, JaymeAnn Olson performed a song from Searching for Romeo (“Come and Get Me, Here I Am”) at a Green Bay Southwest showcase choir concert. “Not exactly the Tony Awards,” says Sutton, “but what the heck…”

Faculty note: Two UW-Green Bay faculty member publish chapter on Gender and SoTL with other UW co-authors

UW-Green Bay Prof. Katia Levintova (Democracy and Justice Studies, Political Science and Global Studies) and Associate Prof. Valerie Murrenus Pilmaier (Humanities, English) along with colleagues, Prof. Valerie Barske (UW-Steven’s Point, History) and Associate Professor Darci Thoune (UW-LaCrosse, English), published a chapter titled “SoTL and the Gendered Division of Labor on our Campuses” in the book “Academic Labor Beyond the College Classroom Working for Our Values,” edited by Holly Hassel and Kirsti Cole (Routledge, Dec. 2019). Their chapter discusses the gendered division of academic research and teaching labor and seeks to effect change in how SoTL (scholarship of teaching and learning) is viewed and rewarded in professional contexts. In doing so, we speak to “the value of particular types of service or research (scholarship of teaching and learning).” This collaboration is a product of UW’s Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Scholars Program (WTFS), where four co-authors first met as part of a 2013-2014 cohort, which inspired them to continue their SoTL research and pedagogical collaboration for years to come.

You are invited to Philosopher’s Cafe, Feb. 12, 7 to 9 p.m.

The College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences invites you to the Philosopher’s Café Series. The series begins on Feb. 12, 2020 from 7 to 9 p.m. at St. Brendan’s Inn (Downtown Green Bay) with a discussion on Racial Ethics. A student of philosophy, critical race theory and black theology, Domonique Turnipseed, recently moved from the deep south to the most segregated city in America to pursue his Ph.D. at Marquette University. Join us as he leads a conversation about the philosophy of race and ethnicity. Philosopher’s Cafés are public forums held at local coffee shops and pubs in which community members engage in open, friendly and respectful dialogue in a relaxed and informal setting. It’s free and open to the public.

Faculty note: Associate Profs. Ann Mattis and Jessica Van Slooten publish article

Associate Professors Ann Mattis (Humanities, BFA, English) and Jessica Van Slooten (Humanities, Women and Gender Studies, English) recently published an article titled, “Assessing Student Learning in GSW: Curricular and Faculty Development in the Two-Year College.” They co-authored the article along with UW-Stevens Point at Wausau Prof. Holly Hassel (English and Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies) and Dean of Arts & Sciences at Bay College Amy Reddinger. The article, which showcases the intersections between the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), assessment and program development appears in the edited collection “Theory and Praxis: Women’s and Gender Studies at Community Colleges,” published by Gival Press in Dec. 2019.