Melt This Frozen Heart: Whiteout and Written in the Stars

Melt This Frozen Heart: Whiteout and Written in the Stars is Associate Professor Jessica Lyn Van Slooten’s latest installment in her monthly ‘Happy Hearts’ column on Cahsseffect.org.  Slooten is a professor of English, Writing Foundations, Humanities, and Women’s & Gender Studies at UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc campus.

Faculty note: Prof. Ortiz appointed to the Equal Rights Commission of the city of Green Bay

UW-Green Bay Prof. Cristina Ortiz (Humanities, Global Studies and Spanish) has been appointed as a member of the Equal Rights Commission of the city of Green Bay. The Commission task is to monitor efforts to eliminate discrimination within city government and the Green Bay community. Ortiz’s appointment will expire on Feb. 1, 2023.

Faculty note: Humanities and History lecturer Kevin Kain named Associate of Virtual Open Research Lab

Senior lecturer Kevin Kain (Humanities and History) has been designated as an Associate of Virtual Open Research Laboratory (VORL) program at the Russian, Eastern European and Eurasian Center, the University of Illinois in Spring 2021 for his research project “Resurrection ‘New Jerusalem’ Monastery in Reigns of Empresses Elizabeth I and Catherine II: Patronage, Power, Sacralization and Legitimacy.” The VORL provides specialized long-distance library research on Central and East Europe and the Independent States of the former Soviet Union. The VORL is funded in part by the US Department of State through its Title VIII Program, which aims to strengthen U.S. expertise and policy-relevant knowledge about the REEES region.

 

Professors Case, Williams and Carr present on dystopian video games, Jan. 31 at 2 p.m.

On Sunday, Jan 31, at 2 p.m., as part of the NEA Big Read: Door County series on the post-pandemic set novel Station Eleven, three UW-Green Bay professors join local teens for a virtual panel discussion on dystopian games. Juli Case (English, Humanities), Chris Williams (English, Humanities), and Bryan Carr (Communication) will discuss games like Fallout and Warhammer 40K, as well as the community of gamers, and economics. Attendance is free and virtual, here.

Meacham, Kopischke and Strickland discuss how arts will save humanity, Saturday at 1 p.m.

On Saturday, Jan 30, at 1 p.m. via Zoom and Facebook Live, Rebecca Meacham (English, Humanities), Alan Kopischke (Arts Management, Theater) and Kelli Strickland, executive director of the Weidner Center for Performing Arts, will discuss how the arts sustain humanity during our darkest times. The event kicks off the NEA Big Read: Door County’s two-week program for Station Eleven, a post-pandemic novel by Emily St. John Mandel that centers on a traveling theater company, a comic book, and a museum of civilization. Attendance is free and virtual here.

NEA Big Read launches virtually in Door county with help of UW-Green Bay faculty/staff

Door County Library is launching its newest NEA Big Read festival this upcoming week with all events being available virtually to the public for free, including a Keynote discussion from author Emily St. John Mandel set for February 11 at 7 pm. The library received an NEA Big Read grant along with financial support from the Women’s Fund Endowment of Door County, Carol Coryell Charitable Fund, Adele and Ed Douglass Charitable Fund, and the Kerley Family Foundation of the Door County Community Foundation, Inc. and was underwritten by the Door County Library Foundation, Door County Medical Center and the Friends of the Door County Libraries, all supporting the community reading program featuring the novel “Station Eleven” by Emily St. John Mandel.

Panelists include: Rebecca Meacham author of two award-winning fiction collections as well as professor of English and Humanities and founding member of UntitledTown Book and Author Festival. Kelli Strickland the Executive and Artistic Director of the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts. Alan Kopischke a university lecturer in both Theater and Arts Management and founding member of the Big Read Door County among other organizations and festivals. And Bryan J. Carr an Associate Professor in the Communication, Information Science, and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies programs at UW-Green Bay specializing in Mass Media and Game Studies and is one of the co-directors of the University’s Center for Games and Interactive Media.

Source: NEA Big Read launches virtually in Door county – Door County Pulse

Professors Boswell and Levintova announce new Syllabus Journal publication

Caroline Boswell (Humanities) and Katia Levintova (Democracy and Justice Studies) co-editors of Syllabus Journal, housed at UW-Green Bay, would like to announce that the journal has just published its latest issue at http://www.syllabusjournal.org/syllabus. In the most current issue, readers will find articles, syllabi, and toolbox (assignments) entries relevant for teaching in the fields of mathematics, film studies, sports psychology, urban studies, education, communication, and social science statistics.
Co-editors  also would like to thank our former editorial assistant, Patrick Sicula ’20 for his “stellar editorial work” on this (and earlier) issues, especially during the pandemic.

Faculty and staff note: Kevin Kain announces new publications

UW-Green Bay Senior Lecturer Kevin Kain (Humanities, History, Global Studies) has published a set of books co-edited with David Goldfrank (Georgetown U.): Russia’s Early Modern Orthodox Patriarchate 2 vols. 1. Foundations and Mitred Royalty, 1589-1647 and 2. Russia’s Early Modern Orthodox Patriarchate: Apogee and Finale, 1648-1721(Washington: Academia Press, 2020).

This project originated with a 23,000 Euro grant awarded to Kain and former UWGB International Visiting Scholar Wolfram von Sheleiha (U. Leipzig) by the Fritz Thyssen Stiftung fur Wisssenschaftsfoerderung. The interdisciplinary collection features sixteen chapters by American, Russian and European scholars of history, art history, religious studies and philology. These include Kain’s essay, “The Living Image of Patriarch Nikon: The Life of the Parsuna [Portrait] ‘Patriarch Nikon with Clergy’.”

Commendations on the book jackets include:

“A wide-ranging account … a fundamental contribution to Russian religious history as well as the story of politics, art, and culture in an era of change and crisis.” – Paul Bushkovitch, Reuben Post Halleck Professor of History, Yale University

“A major contribution to our understanding of Russia’s patriarchate, and more generally, the Russian Orthodox Church in the early modern period.” – Russell E. Martin, Associate Professor of History, Westminster College

Here are the descriptions:

Volume 1 Russia’s Early Modern Orthodox Patriarchate: Foundations and Mitred Royalty, 1589-1647

Focusing on one of Russia’s most powerful and wide-reaching institutions in a period of shattering dynastic crisis and immense territorial and administrative expansion, this book addresses manifestations of religious thought, practice, and artifacts revealing the permeability of political boundaries and fluid transfers of ideas, texts, people, and objects with the rest of the Christian world. The historical background to the establishment Russia’s patriarchate, its chief religious authority, in various eparchies from Late Antiquity sets the stage. Writings such as “The Tale of the Establishment of the Patriarchate,” proved crucial for legitimizing and promoting both this institution and close cooperation with the established tetrarchy of Eastern Orthodox patriarchs. Their attitude remained mixed, however, with persisting unease concerning Russian pretensions to equality. Regarding the most crucial “other” for Christianity’s self-identification, the contradictions inherent in Christianity’s appropriation of the Old Testament became apparent in, for example, the realm’s imperfectly enforced ban on resident Jews. An instance of ordained royalty emerged in the seeming, but really complementary co-rulership of the initial Romanov Tsar Mikhail and his imperious, yet inconsistently xenophobic father, Patriarch Filaret. As a pertinent parallel to Moscow’s patriarchs, and here combining a Romanian regal, Polish aristocratic, and Ukrainian Orthodox self-identity, Petro Mohyla, a metropolitan of the then totally separate Kievan church, founded the Academy which became the most important educational institution for the Russian Orthodox Church into the eighteenth century.

Volume 2 Russia’s Early Modern Orthodox Patriarchate: Apogee and Finale, 1648-1721 

Patriarch Nikon, the most energetic, creative, influential, and obstinate of Russia’s early modern religious leaders, dominates this book, which addresses specifically not only the rich variety of Nikon’s activities and of scholarly interest in him, but also the operations of the patriarchate and range across reform movements and ideology, politics, diplomacy, war, taxation, institutional alms, relic cults, monastery foundation and financing, iconography, architecture, hierotopy, sacral semiotics, portraiture, literature, and education. As head of the Russian Orthodox Church, his most important initiative was to bring Russian religious rituals into line with then current Greek Orthodox practices, from which Russia’s had diverted. Although both Nikon and Tsar Alexis I (r. 1645-1676) envisioned Russia transformed into a new Holy Land, eventually Nikon was accused of challenging the tsar’s authority. His reforms endured, but his poor political judgment appears decisive in his fall and the patriarchate’s reduction in status. Ultimately, the reforms of Peter the Great (r. 1682-1725) led to its replacement by a new, government-controlled body, the Holy Synod, which nevertheless carried out a continuity of Nikon’s policies. This exceptional volume contextualizes Nikon’s patriarchate as part of the broader continuities in Russian history and serves as a bridge through the late Imperial revival of interest in him, to the present, where Russia is forging new relationships between Church and state power.