UW System reports enrollment decline amid pandemic (UW-Green Bay up two percent)

Only branch campuses of UW-Green Bay saw enrollment increases, which were also significant. UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc reported an additional 50 students this fall, which works out to an increase of more than 21 percent. UW-Green Bay, Sheboygan reported an increase of 7.6 percent, and enrollment at UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus increased by nearly 6 percent.

Source: UW System Reports 2 Percent Fall Enrollment Decline Amid Pandemic, WPR

CYP: Coffee & Convos: Mayor Genrich & DEI in Green Bay

On Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020, from Noon to 1 p.m., Join us for a virtual conversation with Mayor Eric Genrich to discuss his vision, plans, and progress made within the Green Bay community on diversity, equity, and inclusion. Hear what he has accomplished since his time in office and what he has in mind to implement DEI initiatives within Green Bay. Then, attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions that matter to them. See the Chamber of Commerce site for more information and online registration.

Current Young Professionals hope to increase volunteerism

The Current Young Professionals Community Partnership Committee, in collaboration with the Volunteer Center of Brown County, has begun a community-wide initiative to increase volunteerism in Greater Green Bay. WE NEED YOU to help us spread the word and get YPs engaged in giving back to the community! It includes an incentive-based program called “CYP Serves.” This program tracks hours through an online platform called “Get Connected” which allows individuals to connect with nonprofits and identify opportunities they need volunteers for. After reaching certain milestones of volunteering, individuals will have access to exclusive perks, be recognized at CYP’s annual Leaders Luncheon, and eligible for additional volunteer awards. Follow the link for more information on CYP Serves, and then get a jump start by volunteering on Make a Difference Day on October 24! This event is free and open to the public.

Chancellor Alexander’s open letter to the communities of Green Bay, Manitowoc, Marinette and Sheboygan

On Friday, July 10, Chancellor Michael Alexander sent a message out to UW-Green Bay students, faculty and staff about how UW-Green Bay is navigating the pandemic, as well as its role in the future of Northeast Wisconsin and its broader community.

Dear UW-Green Bay Students, Faculty and Staff:

At a meeting with campus leadership on Tuesday, I was asked if we were considering how to move forward as a campus after the pandemic.  It was an excellent question and one that I have not done a good enough job articulating an answer for over the last few months.  Like all of you, I have been focused on UW-Green Bay’s careful response and planning related to the immediate crisis. We have learned over the last four months that conditions can shift quickly and new guidance appears almost daily, which can make long range planning a challenge. I want to thank our faculty, staff, students, alumni, and community for being patient and understanding while we navigate these difficult times.  Our enrollment is up 875 students this summer over last year and our faculty and staff are working through the summer in order to be ready for any version of teaching we need to provide in the fall.  We are positioned well to deal with whatever challenges emerge in the coming year, but it is not enough.  We must do much more. 

In the spur of the moment, I answered the question about our future with the first thing that came to my mind.  I believe our long-term vision is the same vision that will guide our university and region in the coming year.  To begin with, we must become comfortable with being uncomfortable.  Our students deal with a fear of the unknown all the time.   Most felt this way prior to the pandemic and those who did not, likely do now.  Prior to the pandemic, I believed an education helped a student contribute to making a positive difference in their region, country, and world.  Now, I believe education must also prepare students to generate constructive dialogue that will help heal and rebuild our communities.

We must stop spending all of our time worrying about the mode of delivery for our courses.  For what feels like my entire career, and certainly over the last four months, we have been debating whether or not to teach in person or online.  It has presented as a binary choice when it does not have be.  The debate has gone on while more and more students need an education that can provide the benefits of both.  We need instruction that honors the fact that a large portion of our students need flexible hours to learn.  They lead complex lives.  Many desire the in-person experience with the flexibility of an online course.  Providing this kind of education is our answer now and it is also our answer in the future.  The first step in providing access to education is ensuring that our classes are actually accessible given the realities of modern life.    

We must fully commit to solving the racial achievement gap (the disparity in academic achievement between black and white students) in our state, which is one of the worst in the country.  While it pains me to say that, we must face this reality head-on and finally fully dedicate ourselves to addressing it. Our community cannot grow together unless we level the educational playing field.  There are massive inequities in our region that are exacerbated by uneven access to education.  This problem has been building since higher education started in this country.  Achievement gaps in education lead to inequities in opportunities and further widen socioeconomic disparities in our region.  Only our actions will determine whether we are truly committed to solving this injustice. This is urgent.

We must fully commit to teaching all who desire an education at any age and with any background.  Universities have often boasted about the academic profile of their student body.  I do not care what the academic profile is of our incoming class.  I only care if each student feels like their life has been enriched by an experience with us.  It is not our place to choose who we teach.  It is our mission to teach all who want to be taught.  There are many universities that will fight over a student with a 4.0 GPA and high SAT score.  I do not begrudge that student or the university that seeks to teach them, but we must fight for the student who has had to struggle, who has potential that is yet to be realized, and who wants to make a difference in their community.  Our region needed that student to have an education prior to the pandemic.  Now it is essential that our University nurtures local students into the leaders of tomorrow.

We must stop assuming that all students go to college to get a degree and do so between the ages of 18-22.  We needed to set this assumption aside prior to the pandemic and it has become even more important to do so now.  Education should be a lifelong pursuit and one that may not always follow a straight line.  Most students expect an affordable education and during the pandemic may not be willing or able to travel far from home to get one.  As education continues to grow in cost, it is becoming a more and more attractive decision for students to stay local for large parts of their educational experience.  We will welcome students at any point in their career to use education to improve their career or broaden their view of the world.

We must change the narrative around the cost of an education.  Our tuition is under $8,000 per year for a Wisconsin resident.  An elite university education can cost upwards of $50,000 per year.  Regardless of the university students choose, it should be viewed as an investment they make in themselves.  Student debt matters when it inhibits a person’s ability to fulfill their potential.  Worse yet is student debt without the completion of one’s educational goals.  We must support students to persist in their education.  We must encourage them to stay on course and finish what they have started. We must be a leader in helping first generation college students successfully navigate the experience.  The narrative on the cost of education and rising debt was broken before the pandemic.  We now have a chance to reset the educational value proposition in the coming year and beyond.  

Our community has rightly demanded that UW-Green Bay grow to support the economy, culture, education, and health of our region.  Now and after the pandemic, we will need leaders to help us move forward. It is our job to prepare them.  We fiercely believe that all students who want a university education should have access to it.  Our mission is to provide that education, and the rapid growth of our University in recent years shows we are fighting to support students to reach their educational goals.  I ask our entire community to join us in the fight to create a more equitable community and one prepared to meet the challenges of the future. 

I am unable to predict exactly what will happen with education in the coming months.  However, I know we are resilient. As the Phoenix, we are up for the challenge that lies ahead. We will rise into the unknown together.

UW-Green Bay partner, The Farmory, is part of Give BIG Green Bay

The Farmory, a UW-Green Bay partnership, is one of the local nonprofits participating in this year’s Give BIG Green Bay Campaign. The Farmory is a campaign that wants to model sustainable ways of growing, eating and living to those around them through education and outreach. The Farmory wishes to create a model of agricultural innovation that reimagines the use of indoor urban spaces and provides our community with opportunities to cultivate healthy, sustainable livelihoods.

Give BIG Green Bay is a partnership between the Green Bay Packers and the Greater Green Bay Community Foundation. This year’s campaign will be the third year of having a 24-hour community philanthropy event. The event starts on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2020 at noon and will end on Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2020 at noon. Donations can be made online through credit card payment, or in person through a check at the Greater Green Bay Community Foundation office.

There are 40 participating nonprofits in this year’s campaign. Other UW-Green Bay Partners include the Jack Nitschke Center, Paul’s Pantry and YMCA Greater Green Bay. More information regarding Give BIG Green Bay, including donation information, can be found on its website.

 

Pride Center Director Stacie Christian referenced in review on Green Bay’s score on LGBTQ rights | Green Bay Press Gazette

The city of Green Bay has greatly improved its score on LGBTQ rights within the last year. “The city doubled its score from 2018 to 2019 on the Human Rights Campaign’s Municipal Equality Index, which scrutinizes how well city governments support their LGBTQ residents.” Stacie Christian, director of the UW-Green Bay Pride Center, was referenced as applauding city leaders for asking questions on making the city more equitable and safer. Read more via Green Bay’s score on LGBTQ rights doubled in one year, but officials say city still has work to do | Green Bay Press Gazette.

Ben Joniaux

Congratulations to UW-Green Bay Future 15 finalists

UW-Green Bay staff and an alumna were recently announced as Current Young Professionals Future 15 Award Finalists. Staff being recognized are Kassie Batchelor, the senior associate athletic director for compliance and student welfare/senior woman administrator, Ben Joniaux (pictured above), chief of staff, and Claudia Guzman, director of Student Life. UW-Green Bay alumna Briana Peters (Accounting and Business) ’13, a manager at Hawkins Ash CPAs, is also identified as a finalist. In addition, Kristina Shelton, YMCA program director, Green Bay Area Public Schools board trustee and wife of UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Jon Shelton (History), is recognized as a finalist.

Kassie Batchelor Future 15 Surprise
Kassie Batchelor (Athletics) receives Future 15 nomination
Claudia Guzman Future 15 Surprise
Claudia Guzman (Student Life) receives Future 15 nomination
Ben Joniaux
Ben Joniaux (Chancellor’s Office) receives Future 15 nomination
Briana Peters Future 15 Surprise
Briana Peters ’13 receives Future 15 nomination

About Current

Current recognizes individuals who are making contributions to their community, and overall make the quality of life greater in the Green Bay Area. Future 15 recipients will be honored at the Future 15 & Young Professional Awards on April 30, 2020 at 5 p.m. at the Radisson Hotel and Conference Center. One of the 15 finalists will be named as the Young Professional of the Year at this event. More information can be found on the Future 15 & Young Professional Awards page.

All aboard the Phoenix Express: UW-Green Bay holiday parade float is a winner for the fifth time

The UW-Green Bay Holiday Parade float won an award for the fifth time at the 36th Annual Prevea Green Bay Holiday Parade. This year’s award recognition was the Grand Marshal’s Award for most original float.

While the theme for this year’s parade was Holiday Magic, UW-Green Bay’s parade float committee took inspiration from the popular book and movie, “Polar Express,” and named the float, “The Phoenix Express: Powered by Higher Education.” The concept of the forward moving train represents the forward momentum UW-Green Bay has been experiencing. Staff members spent many hours over their lunch breaks working on the float to represent UW-Green Bay in the parade.

This was the eighth time UW-Green Bay has participated in the Prevea Green Bay Holiday Parade. Staff and members of their families, students, student athletes, alumni, dance team members and the Hip Hop team participated. The UW-Green Bay team handed out 500 pounds of candy to parade watchers. UW Credit Union and the Weidner Center are the sponsors.

See NBC26 television footage of the parade and watch for the UW-Green Bay float at the 1:05:00 timestamp.

Holiday Light Collection

Holiday Lights RecyclingIn addition to the float, UW-Green Bay incorporates a service project in their parade activities. This year’s project is collecting old holiday lights for Habitat for Humanity Restore. Don’t forget to donate old holiday lights at the designated boxes around campus. These are the locations you can drop your lights off in the designated bins:

  • Cofrin Library second floor plaza level
  • Cofrin Library first floor alcove level
  • Laboratory Sciences lounge area
  • Outside the GAC Lab
  • Rosewood Cafe
  • Office of Student Life
  • Near the Ticketing and Information Desk, University Union
  • Hendrickson Community Center, Residence Life

Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.
Downtown Green Bay Holiday Parade 2019

– Photos by Dan Moore, Marketing and University Communication

Green Bay is 9th happiest city in America | NBC 26

Green Bay has been ranked the ninth happiest city in America, according to SeniorLiving. Factors taken into consideration when ranking the cities were income, housing affordability, life expectancy, commute length, suicide rate, crime rate, unemployment, and household size. More via New study shows Green Bay is 9th happiest city in America |NBC26.