Ganyard, Film Society host screening of Polish/Jewish story, Ida


At 7 p.m. Wednesday (Oct. 21) at the Neville Public Museum, historian and Associate Provost Clif Ganyard will introduce the screening of the Academy Award-winning Polish film Ida as part of the Green Bay Film Society international series. Ida tells the story of a young woman who is about to take her vows as a nun when she learns from her mother superior that she is in fact of Jewish descent. She embarks on a personal journey to discover her story and her family’s past dating to the Nazi era. Co-sponsored by the Polish Heritage Society of Green Bay, the evening’s program is free and open to the public.

Film Society offers timely take on illegal immigration


This Wednesday (Oct. 7) the Green Bay Film Society presents the 2010 Belgium film Illegal, a very timely work about illegal immigration examining the situation of many immigrants in Europe and the process of being placed in detention centers. Prof. David Coury of Humanistic Studies and German will introduce the film’s showing at 7 p.m. and lead a discussion afterward, all in the auditorium of the Neville Public Museum. The event is free and open to the public and co-sponsored by Humanistic Studies and the Brown County Library.

Film Society, Perkins host documentary on Armenian genocide

The Green Bay Film Society is scheduled to show the powerful documentary about the Armenian Genocide, Aghet (2010), at 7 p.m. Wednesday (April 15) at the Neville Public Museum. The International Film Series film will be introduced by UW-Green Bay Curator of Art Stephen Perkins. During the discussion period he will be joined by Levon and Ani Saryan, who will provide an Armenian perspective. The screening of Aghet, by the German filmmaker Eric Friedler, takes place during the same month in 1915, 100 years ago, in which historians say the then-Turkish government initiated the genocide that would claim the lives of 1.5 million Armenians from 1915-1923. The documentary counters genocide-deniers by referencing German and U.S. diplomatic dispatches and eyewitness accounts, as well as footage that has never been seen before. The April 15 session is free and open to the public.

‘Wisconsin from the Air’ screening is Tuesday night

The Green Bay Film Society is teaming up with Wisconsin Public Television and the Neville Public Museum for a special advanced screening of “Wisconsin from the Air,” an hour-long documentary showcasing the spectacular landscape of Wisconsin as filmed from the air, at 7 p.m. Tuesday (Nov. 18). The film premieres Dec. 1 on WPT, but the Neville Museum will host the free, early showing on the big screen in the auditorium. Producers from WPT and the documentary will be on hand to discuss the making of the film as well. The trailer can be viewed here: http://youtu.be/4tyknh3OUn4.

Prof. Sherman to introduce Wednesday’s film series offering

This Wednesday (Sept. 17) at 7 p.m. at the Neville Public Museum, the Green Bay Film Society’s Fall international film series continues with the 2011 Lebanese comedy, “Where do we go now?” Set in a remote village where the church and the mosque stand side by side, the film follows the antics of the town’s women to keep their stubborn men from starting a religious war. In a re-working of Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, the women, heartsick over sons, husbands and fathers being lost to previous flare-ups, unite to distract their men with clever ruses. Prof. Heidi Sherman of Humanistic Studies and History will introduce the film, co-sponsored by Humanistic Studies and the Center for Middle East Studies and Partnerships.

Green Bay Film Festival is this weekend


The Green Bay Press-Gazette’s Kendra Meinert offers a preview of this weekend’s Green Bay Film Festival, Friday through Sunday at the Oneida Radisson. (The festival is a local collaboration that owes a little bit of its history to UW-Green Bay faculty participation in founding the Green Bay Film Society.) There are 90 titles in all, including some homegrown Wisconsin films and international offerings, as well.

Faculty note: McQuade Dewhirst to lead talk on fabled recording studio

The Green Bay Film Society will host a showing at 7 p.m. Wednesday night (Feb. 5) at the Neville Public Museum of the documentary “Sound City,” made by Dave Grohl of Nirvana and the Foo Fighters, chronicling the story of a legendary California recording studio. Associate Prof. Michelle McQuade Dewhirst of Music will introduce the film and lead a discussion afterward. The film is free and open to the public.
 

Lawton show opens Thursday: the ‘Milwaukeeists’

Thursday (Sept. 12) is the opening reception for the Lawton Gallery’s first show of the fall season, titled “Milwaukeeists: 1996-2003.” Guest curated by Milwaukee curator/artist Nicholas Frank, it explores the alternative artistic culture in Milwaukee over an eight-year period. The show includes paintings, photographs, installations, films and ephemera. Frank will be giving a talk about the show at 5 p.m. during the opening reception. A related event to this exhibition is a series of films titled “Milwaukeeists Onscreen” that is being curated by Carl Bogner and Ben Balcom and will be shown as part of the Green Bay Film Society’s Fall Film series on Wednesday, Sept. 18 at 7 p.m. at the Neville Public Museum, Green Bay, (and free to Brown County residents).
 

Another chance to catch a really good Native/basketball movie

An audience of about 100 (including at least a few Phoenix women’s basketball players) turned out at the Christie Theatre Monday night for this week’s first showing of the 2003 made-for-Showtime film Edge of America. It’s an enjoyable watch, with the dynamics of a black coach from Houston traveling to a remote Utah reservation to teach English and coach the underachieving girls basketball team to the state finals. Cast member and actress-in-residence DeLanna Studi led discussion after Monday’s showing. She’ll do the same this Wednesday (March 6) at 7 p.m. at the Neville Public Museum for a free showing as part of the Green Bay Film Society series, co-hosted by Prof. David Coury of Humanistic Studies. See a trailer for the film.

Week’s events for ‘Native American Cinema’

Yesterday’s newsletter told you of a grant-supported series of events that will include a focus on Native American cinema with film screenings and discussions, an introductory workshop to encourage prospective professionals, and a weeklong residency by a prominent Cherokee actor.

Here’s the full lineup, with details:
Saturday, March 2, 3 p.m., Green Bay Film Festival, Oneida Radisson
 “Indians of Today”

Short Films: Selected shorts from the 1491s; Charlie Hill on Richard Pryor; Feature Film: Shouting Secrets
; Actress: DeLanna Studi; Actor/Comedian: Charlie Hill (Oneida Nation); Humanities Panelists: Prof. Patricia Loew, UW-Madison; Profs. Lisa Poupart and JP Leary, UW-Green Bay.

An interesting look at how a group of filmmakers are creating films and internet media to change the face of how Natives are portrayed. Viewing of Shouting Secrets is planned. The film is a portrayal of a Native family today… with a discussion of how does the viewing audience feel about the media that is being produced today.

Sunday, March 3, 1 to 4 p.m.
, Green Bay Film Festival, Oneida Radisson 
“The Business of Acting: SAG Professional Acting Workshop”

Casting Director: Rene Haynes; CSA Actors: DeLanna Studi (Cherokee) Chair, and Brian Wescott (Athabascan), Vice Chair, SAG-AFTRA National Native Americans Committee
.
The Screen Actors Guild/American Federation of Radio and Television Artists and the Green Bay Film Festival present “The Business of Acting,” a workshop to introduce participants to acting, including preparing headshots and resumes, the casting process, and acting in front of the camera, with coaching by experienced professional directors, casting directors, and actors.

Monday, March 4, 9 a.m. to noon
, UW-Green Bay, Christie Theatre, University Union, 
“The Business of Acting: SAG Professional Acting Workshop”

Casting Director: Rene Haynes; CSA Actors: DeLanna Studi (Cherokee), Chair, and Brian Wescott (Athabascan), Vice Chair, SAG-AFTRA National Native Americans Committee.

The Screen Actors Guild/American Federation of Radio and Television Artists and UW-Green Bay First Nations Studies Program present “The Business of Acting,” a workshop to introduce participants to acting, including preparing headshots and resumes, the casting process, and acting in front of the camera, with coaching by experienced professional directors, casting directors, and actors.

Monday, March 4, 7 p.m.
, UW-Green Bay, Christie Theatre, University Union
, Showing of film “Edge of America’ hosted by UW-Green Bay Intertribal Student Council
Based on a true story, “Edge of America” depicts the journey of a high school women’s basketball team on the Three Nations Reservation from a collection of struggling individuals into a contender and source of community pride. Actor DeLanna Studi (Cherokee), who plays Carla McKinney, will be on hand for a follow-up discussion.

Tuesday, March 5, 7 p.m., American Indian Film Society, at Norbert Hill Center, Oneida, 
“An Evening of Short Films”

An evening of short films takes place in the Business Committee Chambers at the Norbert Hill Center, Oneida, to kick off the American Indian Film Society. Invited guests and filmmakers including DeLanna Studi (“Two Sprits, One Journey” and “Powwow Dreams”), Chris Powless (Oneida), and Ernie Stevens III (Oneida) will host and help lead the discussion.

Wednesday, March 6, 7 p.m., 
Neville Public Museum
, Showing of Film “Edge of America” as part of Green Bay Film Society series

Based on a true story, “Edge of America” depicts the journey of a high school women’s basketball team on the Three Nations Reservation from a collection of struggling individuals into a contender and source of community pride. Actor DeLanna Studi (Cherokee), who plays Carla McKinney, will be on hand for a follow-up discussion. Hosted by the Green Bay Film Society.

Friday, March 8, 12:30 to 2 p.m., UW-Green Bay Rose Hall 250, 
“Arts and Advocacy in American Indian Education”

Actor DeLanna Studi will share stories of her upbringing and education in rural eastern Oklahoma, her experiences as a professional actor in film and theater, and how these experiences have led her to become an advocate for Native issues. As a performing artist and arts educator, she has used her work as an opportunity to challenge representations of Native people in the media and to shape public responses to them. She will also discuss the joys and difficulties of being an actor navigating the industry while maintaining a sense of community, culture, gender and humor. As the current chair of the SAG-AFTRA National Committee for Native Americans, she will discuss the efforts being made to create more roles for Native actors, and how now is the time for Native people to tell their own stories. All are welcome.

Full details are in our press release.