Great Decisions Lecture Series: Struggles Over the Melting Arctic this Wednesday

U.S. President Donald Trump left many scratching their heads when it was rumored that he was looking to purchase the large island nation of Greenland from Denmark. While any potential deal seems highly unlikely, the event shows the changing opinion within the U.S. government toward engagement with the Arctic region. Because of climate change, large sheets of arctic ice are melting, exposing vast stores of natural gas and oil. With Russia and China already miles ahead with their Arctic strategies, can the U.S. catch up? Join Associate Professor Rebecca McKean (Geology) of St. Norbert on Wednesday, March 3, 2021 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Register at CAHSS & Effect.

 

Water Contamination in Northeast Wisconsin panel is Thursday, March 4, 7:30 p.m.

Due to the geography of Northeast Wisconsin, groundwater contamination is very common in Green Bay. These contaminants could range anywhere from macronutrients like nitrates to contaminants like arsenic and PFAS. These contaminants jeopardize hundreds of families’ well water and food sources. Virtually join Casey Hicks from the Wisconsin Conservation Voters about the different contaminates in our area and Andi Rich, an environmental activist based in Marinette Wisconsin who will be telling her story of PFAS contamination in her area. This event is on Thursday, March, 4 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. via Zoom.

 

 

Texas energy woes thrust state to center of climate policy debate | KTVL

“When you have an emergency situation, it causes people to rethink a lot of fundamentals about energy generation,” said Michael Kraft, a professor emeritus of political science and environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and author of several books on environmental policy.

Source: Texas energy woes thrust state to center of climate policy debate | KTVL

Assistant Professor Michael Holly funded to help predict groundwater contamination

UW-Green Bay Assistant Professor Michael Holly
Assistant Professor Michael Holly

The Freshwater Collaborative of Wisconsin (FWC) awarded $122,000 to Assistant Professor Michael Holly (Environmental Science, Water Science) to lead a working group to investigate the environmental transport of PFAS. Research completed by the Sustainable Use of Biosolids (SUBS) working group (including PIs at UW-Platteville, Madison, and Stevens Point) will provide training and laboratory experience for undergraduate students at each campus. Completed work will help predict future PFAS groundwater contamination from soils receiving biosolids, facilitate generation of future land application guidelines to protect groundwater wells from PFAS, identify Wisconsin groundwater sources at risk, and evaluate a low-cost treatment to further minimize PFAS leaching.

Students in Assistant Professor Kelly Deuerling's Geochemistry of Natural Waters' outdoor lab use a field instrument to test the water at the mouth of the Mahon Creek in the Cofrin Memorial Arboretum at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay campus.

Photos: Geochemistry of Natural Waters Outdoor Lab

Students in Assistant Professor Kelly Deuerling’s Geochemistry of Natural Waters’ outdoor lab learn about the instrumentation at the stream gauging station and use a field instrument to see where the waters from the bay of Green Bay start to influence the composition of Mahon Creek in the Cofrin Memorial Arboretum at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay campus.

Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.

Geochemistry of Natural Waters Outdoor Lab

– Photos by University Marketing & Communication Intern, William S. Throndsen.

UW-Green Bay Environmental Science student Jacob Derenne studying soil health and water quality.

UW-Green Bay students study water quality and soil health

UW-Green Bay Environmental Science student Jacob Derenne is part of a project team working on a study to link properties of soil health (a suite of biological, chemical and physical properties) to the quality of water that runs off the field during rain events. Last week (August 31-Sept. 1, 2020) the team was measuring the infiltration capacity of the soil and collected samples to determine the water holding capacity, the resistance of the soil clumps (aggregates) to destruction by rainfall and the degree of soil compaction, according to Prof. Kevin Fermanich.

The teams in Wisconsin are working on farms near Wrightstown and Greenleaf.

Photo was courtesy of Molly Meyers, project coordinator.

UW-Green Bay EMBI student interns help make the annual Green Bay Garden Blitz a great success

Caitlin Curtis gives the camera a thumbs up.

Pong Moua (Environmental Science) served as Garden Blitz communication coordinator and Caitlin Curtis (Environmental Policy and Planning) as assistant volunteer coordinator at the seventh annual Green Bay Garden Blitz from May 28-31, 2020. Moua (pictured above), Curtis and 48 volunteers installed 74 raised bed garden boxes at private homes, Kennedy School and Veterans Manor.

Facing challenges due to COVID-19 concerns, the 2020 Garden Blitz accomplished its goals safely and on schedule. Kim Diaz, Blitz coordinator, said “working with Pong and Caitlin was a joy because they were so talented, dedicated and willing to learn.”

UW-Green Bay Prof. Kevin Fermanich named 2020 NEW Watershed Champion

UW-Green Bay Prof. Kevin Fermanich (Water Science, Geoscience and Environmental Science) has been named the 2020 NEW Watershed Champion. He formally received this recognition on Tuesday, March 10, 2020 from NEW Water and the Green Bay Water Utility during the 2020 World Water Day event.

Prof. Fermanich is a lead co-principal investigator on a collaborative project studying the links between edge-of-field water quality, soil health and field management at sites in Great Lakes priority watersheds. Additionally, he is a soil and water resources specialist with Wisconsin Extension.

Fermanich was recognized at the seventh annual World Water Day event hosted by NEW Water, the brand of the Green Bay Metropolitan Sewerage District, and the Green Bay Water Utility at the Jack Day Environmental Education Center. World Water Day (www.worldwaterday.org) is a commemorative event launched by the United Nations in 1993 to bring awareness to global water issues. The two water entities honor World Water Day to call attention to local water issues, including aging infrastructure and impairments, and to celebrate the efforts of a local champion in caring for the watersheds of Wisconsin.

The theme of this year’s World Water Day is “Water and Climate Change.” Globally, this means an increasing demand for water as populations increase, which can drain natural resources and cause environmental damage.

“The Green Bay Water Utility is adapting to address the water effects of climate change to continue to protect health and safety to our customers,” said Nancy Quirk, general manager of the Green Bay Water Utility.

The World Water Day held in Green Bay also serves to celebrate local efforts to strive toward solutions. Learn more about past Champions here.

Fermanich has worked at UW-Green Bay since 1998. Along with many partners, Fermanich and his students study water quality, watershed management, soil health, Green Bay restoration, and agricultural management issues. He is a lead co-principal investigator on a collaborative project studying the links between edge-of-field water quality, soil health, and field management at sites in Great Lakes priority watersheds. Additionally, Fermanich is a soil and water resources specialist with Wisconsin Extension.

“Our era faces a number of water challenges, not only globally, but here in Wisconsin as well.  Dr. Fermanich exemplifies the spirit of working together to find solutions to the many vexing water challenges we’re facing today,” said Tom Sigmund, Executive Director of NEW Water.

Learn more about Green Bay Water Utility: www.gbwater.org
Learn more about NEW Water: www.newwater.us

This post is written in cooperation with NEW Water. Photo submitted by Tricia Garrison, NEW Water. In the photo, from left to right, Tom Sigmund, executive director, NEW Water; Prof. Kevin Fermanich and Nancy Quirk, general manager, Green Bay Water Utility