Campus celebrates achievements, looks to the future during Convocation

top-story-convocationFaculty, staff and friends gathered to celebrate tradition and tomorrow Jan. 22, taking part in Mid-Year Convocation in the Phoenix Room.

As is customary during the winter event, individuals celebrating service milestones were honored for anniversaries ranging from 10 years to 40. Recognized for his four decades at UW-Green Bay, event emcee Prof. Cliff Abbott drew a standing ovation as the distinction was announced.

Also as part of the ceremony, two new academic staff emeriti were honored for their service to UW-Green Bay. Gary Fewless, longtime lecturer and curator of the University Herbarium that now bears his name; and Mike Herrity, former UW-Green Bay Registrar and academic adviser, were recognized. Neither was able to attend the event, but each received hearty applause as his citation was read.

Click here for more information about the service anniversary and emeriti honorees.

The University community also celebrated a brand-new distinction as Associate Prof. David Radosevich was formally recognized as the first-ever Austin E. Cofrin Endowed Chair of Business. The position is the University’s second endowed chair, joining the John P. Blair Endowed Chair in Communications, which was established in 2005. Click here for more on Radosevich and his honor.

Following the recognitions, Chancellor Gary L. Miller took the stage to deliver his Mid-Year Commencement remarks. The prepared text of his remarks is available here, and a summary is as follows:

 

Miller remarks: Challenges await but ‘the future is ours’

Chancellor Gary L. Miller painted a realistic yet forward-looking picture of the challenges and opportunities facing UW-Green Bay during his Mid-Year Convocation remarks Thursday, Jan. 22.

Speaking before faculty and staff members who assembled for the annual winter gathering, Miller offered updates on a variety of University activities and initiatives; addressed a bleak state budget picture; spoke about the future of shared governance and tenure; and concluded with a short-and longer-term look ahead.

“I am so excited about this place and its future,” Miller said. “The power we have to create our future through innovation, to transform the lives of many more students in this region by inviting them to join the extraordinary learning community, and to change this place to improve the human condition are limited only by our imagination. It is a great privilege to be your partner in this wonderful journey.”

Among the issues addressed:

Review of activities and initiatives

  • Miller welcomed Provost Stephen Fritz, who began his new role in January. Praising Fritz’s academic and leadership background, Miller expressed confidence in the provost’s ability to lead during what will be an important time of transition for UW-Green Bay.
  • The enrollment issue continues to be a challenge for UW-Green Bay, Miller said, but he praised progress that has been made (and thanked the majority of people present for their efforts in just a few short months) in analyzing enrollment’s effect on the budget; addressing various enrollment needs; and partnering with the Green Bay community. “We have much to do about enrollment,” Miller said, “and we’ll continue to look at this process. I’m very excited about where we are versus six months ago.”
  • Miller also addressed his “Invent the Future” transition initiative and lauded the work of faculty and staff members who comprise its steering committee and working groups. The process will conclude during spring semester, leaving leadership with “a deep catalog of innovations and recommendations upon which we can draw as we shape our future.”
  • Continuing with the theme of looking ahead, Miller spoke about the University’s new planning process, which will be guided in large part by the University Planning and Innovation Committee (UPIC). During spring semester, this group will take on an “ambitious curriculum” of learning about budgets, enrollments, the regulatory environment, athletics and other areas in an effort to inform better planning and allow the University a better strategic position in the years ahead.

The state budget

Miller offered a sobering assessment of the state budget, noting that while concrete information is lacking, the UW System is likely to face a significant and potentially painful cut during the next biennium. Even as specifics remain unknown, Miller emphasized the need for a “strong, transparent and inclusive budget reduction and reallocation process.”

That process will be spearheaded by Provost Fritz, who will organize the development of recommendations for reductions and reallocations based on advice from numerous leaders and stakeholders. The UPIC will vet those recommendations before they are submitted to the Cabinet and ultimately himself, Miller said. Regular town hall-style meetings will be held to communicate activities, answer questions and get ideas.

“The coming round of reductions,” Miller said, “will not diminish this University or alter our course to greatness.”

Shared governance and System flexibility

Shared governance and tenure are likely to be moved from state statute, Miller said, with the authority for both transferred to the UW System Board of Regents. And while he said such a move is neither optimal nor desirable, Miller reiterated his steadfast support for both provisions and expressed his confidence that the change would not diminish shared governance or threaten tenure.

“These institutions are part of the higher education systems in all 50 states,” Miller said, “and continue to survive attempts to alter or dissolve them, primarily because everyone understands they are both essential to the capacity of this great enterprise.”

The chancellor also addressed efforts to secure increased flexibility for the UW System, clarifying certain aspects of the proposal while inviting those assembled to ask questions if they seek additional information.

Additional flexibilities won’t prevent drastic state budget cuts — “the fact is, the state budget’s in extremely bad shape,” Miller said — but it will be beneficial in the long term as the Board of Regents, not the Legislature, guides UW System recovery and growth in the future. Miller is a “strong supporter” of obtaining the additional flexibilities, he said.

‘The future is ours’

Miller concluded his address on a high note, reiterating the powers of transformation, innovation and place and looking ahead to UW-Green Bay’s 50th Anniversary celebration.

“The excitement of this celebration is what will take us into the next half century,” Miller said. “The thrill of designing a future for this University. The possibility of even greater things to come. These are the things I think about every day, and when I talk to you, this is what I hear coming back from you.

“And I am so fortunate to be with you on this great journey. Let’s have a great year — it’s a New Year — and Go Phoenix!”

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Photos by Sue Bodilly, Marketing and University Communication

School of Business’ Radosevich honored as inaugural Cofrin Endowed Chair

Radosevich honored as Cofrin Endowed ChairUW-Green Bay honored the institution’s first-ever Austin E. Cofrin Endowed Chair of Business during Mid-Year Convocation ceremonies Jan. 22.

Associate Prof. David J. Radosevich, chair of UW-Green Bay’s Master’s of Management program, was recognized and presented with a ceremonial medallion during the annual winter gathering of faculty and staff. He began his term as endowed professor Jan. 1, and will serve an initial appointment extending through June 30, 2018. The appointment is renewable on a 3-year basis thereafter.

UW-Green Bay Chancellor Gary L. Miller presided over the medallion ceremony, praising Radosevich’s past achievements while keeping an eye on the future.

“He is someone who will interact effectively and proactively with business leaders, colleagues and key stakeholders,” Miller said. “I am confident his work will honor the innovative legacy of Austin E. Cofrin, and help elevate our School of Business to even higher levels of achievement.”

Cofrin founded the Fort Howard Paper Co. in 1919 and turned the Green Bay-based manufacturer into one of the world’s largest tissue products companies. He died in 1980 at the age of 96. Industry colleagues praised Cofrin for his visionary leadership and resourcefulness in solving problems, achieving efficiencies and anticipating new markets.

It was a desire to more fully honor Austin Cofrin that led his son, Dr. David A. Cofrin, shortly before his death in August 2009, to announce a $5.5 million gift to the University. That contribution, the largest single private gift for academics in school history, provided funding for the endowed chair and other academic enhancements, and led to UW-Green Bay renaming its business program the Austin E. Cofrin School of Business. Taken collectively, Business Administration, Accounting and the Master’s of Management account for about 1,000 students and more than 6,000 alumni, or roughly one-fifth of all current and former students.

Radosevich has been a member of the Business Administration faculty at UW-Green Bay since 2003. He has been a frequent consultant to leading companies in the areas of executive assessment, selection, training, needs assessment, and performance management. Clients have included Wal-Mart, Schering Plough, New York State Police, Bell Atlantic and several other Fortune 500 companies.

His research examines variables in personal motivation and how individuals strive for goals over time. He has published extensively in journals including the Journal of Applied Psychology, International Journal of Business Research, Review of Business Research and Innovate. Additionally, he has studied the impact of technology in the classroom on student learning and satisfaction. He has taught courses in leadership and team development, organizational change and behavior, human resource management, research methods, statistics and psychology.

Radosevich received his bachelor’s in psychology from Western Maryland College in 1994 and his Ph.D. in industrial/organizational psychology from the University at Albany, State University of New York in 1999.

An endowed chair is a faculty position in a focused area of importance to the University. The chair is filled by a distinguished faculty member who has a national or international reputation in his or her field. The other endowed chair at UW-Green Bay is the John P. Blair Endowed Chair in Communication, created in 2005 and filled by Prof. Timothy Meyer until his retirement in 2013, when Prof. Phillip Clampitt was named to the position.

The Austin E. Cofrin School of Business is in the process of joining a select group of national peers by pursuing accreditation through the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Chancellor Miller says the addition of an endowed chair to the program, along with the excellence in teaching, research and community service exemplified by Radosevich and his colleagues, should be positive factors as UW-Green Bay prepares for AACSB review.

Radosevich first to hold Cofrin Endowed Chair at UW-Green Bay

David_Radosevich_webAssociate Prof. of Management David J. Radosevich has been honored at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay with his selection as the first individual to hold the University’s newly created Austin E. Cofrin Endowed Chair of Business.

Radosevich, chairman of UW-Green Bay’s Master’s of Management program, will begin his term as endowed professor Jan. 1. The initial appointment extends through June 30, 2018, and is renewable on a three-year basis thereafter.

Radosevich will be presented a medallion commemorating the prestigious honor Thursday, Jan. 22, during UW-Green Bay’s mid-year convocation to open the second semester. The award will be made by Chancellor Gary L. Miller and Provost Stephen E. Fritz.

In announcing the selection, Chancellor Miller praised Radosevich’s record of achievement.

“There are high expectations for this position, not only in terms of excellence in scholarship and teaching but also in leadership and advocacy for the Austin E. Cofrin School of Business,” the chancellor said. “Dr. Radosevich is someone who is going to interact effectively and proactively with business leaders, colleagues and other key stakeholders. I am confident his work will honor the innovative legacy of Austin E. Cofrin.”

Cofrin founded the Fort Howard Paper Co. in 1919 and turned the Green Bay-based manufacturer into one of the world’s largest tissue products companies. He died in 1980 at the age of 96. Industry colleagues praised Cofrin for his visionary leadership and resourcefulness in solving problems, achieving efficiencies and anticipating new markets.

It was a desire to more fully honor Austin Cofrin that led his son, Dr. David A. Cofrin, shortly before his death in August 2009, to announce a $5.5 million gift to the University. That contribution, the largest single private gift for academics in school history, provided funding for the endowed chair and other academic enhancements, and led to UW-Green Bay renaming its business program the Austin E. Cofrin School of Business. Taken collectively, Business Administration, Accounting and the Master’s of Management account for about 1,000 students and more than 6,000 alumni, or roughly one-fifth of all current and former students.

Radosevich has been a member of the Business Administration faculty at UW-Green Bay since 2003. He has been a frequent consultant to leading companies in the areas of executive assessment, selection, training, needs assessment, and performance management. Clients have included Wal-Mart, Schering Plough, New York State Police, Bell Atlantic and several other Fortune 500 companies.

His research examines variables in personal motivation and how individuals strive for goals over time. He has published extensively in journals including the Journal of Applied Psychology, International Journal of Business Research, Review of Business Research and Innovate. Additionally, he has studied the impact of technology in the classroom on student learning and satisfaction. He has taught courses in leadership and team development, organizational change and behavior, human resource management, research methods, statistics and psychology.

Radosevich received his bachelor’s in psychology from Western Maryland College in 1994 and his Ph.D. in industrial/organizational psychology from the University at Albany, State University of New York in 1999.

An endowed chair is a faculty position in a focused area of importance to the University. The chair is filled by a distinguished faculty member who has a national or international reputation in his or her field. The other endowed chair at UW-Green Bay is the John P. Blair Endowed Chair in Communication, created in 2005 and filled by Prof. Timothy Meyer until his retirement in 2013, when Prof. Phillip Clampitt was named to the position.

The Austin E. Cofrin School of Business is in the process of joining a select group of national peers by pursuing accreditation through the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Chancellor Miller says the addition of an endowed chair to the program, along with the excellence in teaching, research and community service exemplified by Radesovich and his colleagues, should be positive factors as UW-Green Bay prepares for AACSB review.

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Reminder: Presentation by Austin E. Cofrin Endowed Chair finalist

The second candidate to become UW-Green Bay’s first Austin E. Cofrin Chair of Business is scheduled to present from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Thursday (Feb. 27) in MAC 223. For more on Angela Hwang, professor of accounting at Eastern Michigan University, see our previous post.

Details on Cofrin Chair candidate presentation

Here’s a reminder about the presentations by two finalists for the Austin E. Cofrin Endowed Chair in Business (Accounting).

Monday (Feb. 17) 9:30-11 a.m., Wood Hall 324Jerry Lin, professor of accounting at Colorado State University at Pueblo. His Ph.D. in accounting is from the University of North Texas, Denton. His research presentation will address “Economic incentives for disclosing or withholding corporate venturing investment information.”


Thursday, Feb. 27, 9:30-11 a.m., MAC 223Angela Hwang, professor of accounting at Eastern Michigan University. Her Ph.D. in accounting is from the University of Houston. Her research presentation will focus on “Learning accounting for foreign currency transactions with hedging derivatives.

Candidates for Cofrin Endowed Chair will make campus presentations

The Cofrin School of Business is pleased to welcome to campus two candidates for the Austin E. Cofrin Endowed Chair in Business (Accounting). The individual chosen for the position will assume a key faculty leadership position in the Cofrin School of Business as it pursues AACSB accreditation. The qualified candidate will value teaching, have a high energy level, be able to operate effectively in a participatory, collegial environment, and have an interest in mentoring colleagues in the area of scholarship. The School of Business invites all UWGB faculty and staff to attend the Research Presentations and “meet and greet” sessions for both candidates, as follows:

Monday (Feb. 17) 9:30-11 a.m., Wood Hall 324 —Jerry Lin, professor of accounting at Colorado State University at Pueblo. His Ph.D. in accounting is from the University of North Texas, Denton. His research presentation will address “Economic incentives for disclosing or withholding corporate venturing investment information.”
Thursday, Feb. 27, 9:30-11 a.m., MAC 223 —Angela Hwang, professor of accounting at Eastern Michigan University. Her Ph.D. in accounting is from the University of Houston. Her research presentation will focus on “Learning accounting for foreign currency transactions with hedging derivatives.”

Colleagues are invited to step in and out as their busy schedules allow.

Snapshots: UW-Green Bay faculty, staff kick off 2013 with mid-year convocation

UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members gathered to prepare for a new semester Wednesday, Jan. 23, during the mid-year convocation event held at the University Union.

Smaller in scale than its August counterpart, the January convocation nonetheless fulfills the dual roles of celebrating achievements past and anticipating the semester yet to come.

Emceed by Prof. Cliff Abbott (in trademark red bowtie), the event kicked off with a celebration of service anniversaries for UW-Green Bay faculty and staff. From the 10-year honor celebrated by many to the 40-year benchmark achieved by just one (CPS Dean’s Assistant Mary Baranek), each honoree was recognized in front of the group. Faculty and staff emeriti were similarly honored, and received plaques acknowledging the milestone.

Convocation also included a significant honor for UW-Green Bay Prof. Phillip Clampitt, who was installed as the prestigious John P. Blair Endowed Chair in Communication. To read more about Clampitt’s honor and distinguished history at UW-Green Bay, click on full coverage here. The event also featured Chancellor Tom Harden’s mid-year remarks, summarized here.

After the program, attendees were treated to a luncheon in the Union’s Cloud Commons. Spring semester classes start Monday, Jan. 28.

Click images to enter slideshow.

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Photos by Kimberly Vlies, Marketing and University Communication

Clampitt installed as distinguished Blair Chair professor

Prof. Phillip Clampitt of the Information and Computing Science faculty has been honored at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay with his selection to hold the University’s prestigious John P. Blair Endowed Chair in Communication.

Prof. Phillip Clampitt
Prof. Phillip Clampitt

Clampitt was presented a medallion signifying the honor Wednesday (Jan. 23) during UW-Green Bay’s mid-year convocation to open the second semester. The award was made by Chancellor Tom Harden and Provost Julia Wallace.

Clampitt, a nationally regarded researcher and writer on strategic and organizational communication and leadership, has been a member of the UW-Green Bay faculty since 1981. He succeeds retired colleague Timothy Meyer as “Blair Chair” professor, a position Meyer held since the professorship’s inception in 2005.

In making the presentation, Wallace described Clampitt as “one of this institution’s most accomplished researchers and effective instructors.”

Clampitt teaches in both the Information and Computing Science and the Communication academic units at UW-Green Bay. He received his doctorate in organizational communication from the University of Kansas. He has been published in leading management and communication journals. The Wall Street Journal and MIT Sloan Management Review highlighted his work on “Decision Downloading” which details how companies can effectively communicate decisions to employees and stakeholders.

His most recent book, Transforming Leaders into Progress Makers: Leadership for the 21st Century, co-authored with Boldt Company CEO Robert J. DeKoch, won critical praise. It combined original research with first-person stories of successful leaders, and offered strategy suggestions for progress-making leadership. Clampitt is also the author of the textbooks Communicating for Managerial Effectiveness, fifth edition; and Embracing Uncertainty: The Essence of Leadership.

Clampitt founded the consulting firm MetaComm and has completed communication audits and applied research projects with major employers throughout Wisconsin and beyond. In addition to many guest speaking opportunities in the United States, he has also been invited to speak internationally at The University of Pisa, The University of Aberdeen, The University of Ulster, and before numerous multi-national businesses and professional organizations.

Clampitt most recently held the title of Philip and Elizabeth Hendrickson Professor of Business at UW-Green Bay. He is a recipient of the University’s Founders Award for Excellence in Scholarship.

An endowed chair permanently adds a full faculty position in a focused area of importance to the donor and to the University. The chair is filled by a distinguished faculty member who has a national or international reputation in his or her field.

Since the Blair Chair became UW-Green Bay’s first endowed professorship in 2005, the University has been able to expand its communication offerings. Meyer, the original holder, says the Blair gift allowed his unit to expand the curriculum and offer more and advanced courses in public relations and, specifically, media planning and buying.

The John P. Blair Endowed Chair in Communication honors the memory of one of America’s early pioneers in the field of radio and TV advertising. In 1948, after greatly expanding his radio station sales-representative business, Midwest native and New York City ad executive John Blair established the first agency of its kind devoted to selling spot television advertising. Years later, his widow, Dorothy, would make the multi-million dollar gift to establish the chair. In doing so, she expressed her family’s respect for the University of Wisconsin, the quality of UW-Green Bay’s undergraduate programs in communication, and the region’s strength as a communication and media market.

Mid-Year Convocation set for 10:30 Wednesday

The traditional mid-year convocation of UW-Green Bay faculty and staff is scheduled to begin at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday (Jan. 23) in the University Union’s Phoenix Room. The agenda is as follows:


• Acknowledgment of employees celebrating length-of-service anniversaries
• Presentation of the John P. Blair Endowed Chair in Communication
• Presentation of faculty/staff emeriti plaques
• Remarks by Chancellor Tom Harden
• Complimentary buffet lunch courtesy of the UW-Green Bay Foundation, Inc.

Highlights include presentation of Blair Chair to Prof. Clampitt
Prof. Phillip G. Clampitt of Information and Computing Science will be formally honored at Wednesday’s convocation with presentation of The John. P. Blair Endowed Chair in Communication. Clampitt succeeds retiring colleague Timothy Meyer as the holder of the University’s first fully endowed chair. Chancellor Tom Harden and Provost Julia Wallace will present Clampitt with a ceremonial medallion. We’ll have photos and additional detail about the honor in the next issue of this newsletter.

Clampitt will be new Blair Chair

Also announced Tuesday at Convocation – well, actually, it was “mentioned” or “shared,” as a more formal announcement and recognition ceremony will take place later this academic year — was the identity of the newest holder of the John P. Blair Endowed Chair in Communication. Chancellor Tom Harden revealed that Prof. Phillip Clampitt of the Information and Computing Science faculty has been selected to follow colleague Timothy Meyer as “Blair Chair” professor. The retired Meyer had held the honor since its inception, in 2005. Clampitt, a nationally regarded researcher and writer on strategic and organizational communication and leadership, has been a member of the UW-Green Bay faculty since 1981.