Tonight: 2017 Philosophers Café kicks-off with Provost Greg Davis

Maybe one of your New Year resolutions was to get out more, or find opportunities to chat with folks about different and odd but stimulating topics. Heck, maybe it was to finally unearth the governing dynamics of this brilliant universe of ours. Or maybe it was just to drink more coffee or beer in local establishments where sometimes heated conversations ensue… For any of the above, consider attending the Thursday, Jan.12, 2017 Philosophers Café. Provost Greg Davis will help pose and consider some deeply puzzling and important questions about the reality of mathematics. Do numbers just describe relationships that appear in mathematical structures — the formalists’ view — or are they real, as Plato argued?  Davis will help attendees think about some different number systems, different conceptions of infinity, and the so-called “butterfly effect.” The Café meets Thursday from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Hinterland’s Second Floor Lounge (313 Dousman St., Green Bay). All are invited.

2017 Philosophers Café kicks-off with Provost Greg Davis (this Thursday)

Maybe one of your New Year resolutions was to get out more, or find opportunities to chat with folks about different and odd but stimulating topics. Heck, maybe it was to finally unearth the governing dynamics of this brilliant universe of ours. Or maybe it was just to drink more coffee or beer in local establishments where sometimes heated conversations ensue… For any of the above, consider attending Thursday, Jan.12, 2017 Philosophers Café. Provost Greg Davis will help pose and consider some deeply puzzling and important questions about the reality of mathematics. Do numbers just describe relationships that appear in mathematical structures — the formalists’ view — or are they real, as Plato argued?  Davis will help attendees think about some different number systems, different conceptions of infinity, and the so-called “butterfly effect.” The Café meets Thursday from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Hinterland’s Second Floor Lounge (313 Dousman St., Green Bay). All are invited.

David Voelker leads community reflection Friday

Are you having difficulty finding empathy and kindness following the divisiveness of last week’s election? Do you wonder if these things are even possible or desirable? Please join facilitator David Voelker for a reflective discussion from 11 a.m. to noon, on Friday, Nov. 18 in Wood Hall 410 (Education Center for First Nations Studies, conference room). This nonpartisan discussion is open to all members of the campus community, regardless of political orientation. If you would like to participate, it’s important to arrive on time. Please contact David Voelker at voelkerd@uwgb.edu with any questions or if you need any special accommodations.

Final fall semester Global Studies discussion

The final Global Studies discussion of the semester will be held in the 1965 Room of the University Union, from 12 to 1:30 p.m. tomorrow, Nov. 15. The discussion will be led by Prof. Caroline Boswell (History and Humanistic Studies), UWGB’s resident British historian, and will cover the 100-year anniversary of the Easter Rising, the Irish rebellion that established the Republic of Ireland in 1916. All are invited.

Searching for Romeo discussion

UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. and Director of English Composition and the Writing Center, Brian Sutton, will be giving a presentation on his play, Searching for Romeo, from 2 to 3 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 7 in the 1965 room of the University Union. The discussion will revolve around the evolution of the play, from Sutton’s conception of the plot to its current state, as well as the production history and more. Joining Sutton will be Jeff Entwistle (set designer and publicity director), Kaoime Malloy (costume designer), to discuss their contributions to the play and how that relates to broader issues within set and costume design. “Overall, the session will touch on Shakespearean adaptation, certain specialized forms of creative writing and music composition, the collaborative nature of theatrical production, and perhaps the interplay between creative arts and market forces,” says Sutton. Free food will be provided. Tickets for the show, (Nov. 17-19), are on sale now at UTIC or Ticketstar locations.

UWGB alumna Juliet Cole leads Stand Against Racism panel

UW-Green Bay alumna, longtime employee and YWCA board member, Juliet Cole, will be leading a community discussion on race from Noon to 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 26. Called “Courageous Discussions,” this panel is one of the Stand Against Racism’s six planned community discussions for 2016-17, hosted by the YWCA. The ethnically diverse panel members will use their cultural, personal and professional experiences to answer questions regarding racism in the Green Bay community, changes in the cultural climate and hopes for the future. All are welcome to bring their lunches and attend the discussion to learn how we can take a stand against racism as a community. For more information, contact Kay Baranczyk@ywcagreenbay.org.

Philosophers’ Café meeting

Is imitation the greatest form of flattery? Is it a negative? This will be the main topic of discussion for the Philosophers’ Café from 7-8:30 p.m. this Thursday, Oct.13. UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Sawa Senzaki (Psychology and Human Development) will be evaluating various areas of interest surrounding imitation, including why we imitate, its evolutional origin and its implication for our culture. All are welcome to join the discussion, at second floor lounge of Hinterland Brewery, (313 Dousman St., Green Bay).

Senators Tammy Baldwin and Dave Hansen campus visit

Tammy Baldwin recently visited UWGB to hold a roundtable discussion on her “In the Red” legislation. Senator Dave Hansen was also present to speak about his college affordability efforts at the state level. Current and former students shared their stories about funding their college education and paying off student debt. See the photo.

Chancellor’s statement on tolerance, need for discussion

Already distributed campuswide, but repeated here for the record, is an email sent this morning to faculty, staff and students from UW-Green Bay Chancellor Gary L. Miller:

The recent events at the University of Missouri and elsewhere in the American Academy remind me of the importance of our commitment to diversity and tolerance, and our obligation to provide a welcoming and supportive campus for all students, faculty, staff and visitors.  I hope you will join me in reaffirming these values. I encourage you to engage each other and our students in discussions about the important issues of our time and to advance ideas and concerns that will help us improve our programs and our campus environment.  The free exchange of ideas and perspectives are founding principles of UWGB that will serve us well in this time. Thank you and Go Phoenix!

‘We All Deserve to Die?’ HUS looks at ethics, political violence in Gothic stories

Humanistic Studies will host another Faculty Forum on Friday, May 8, at 2:30 p.m. in the Fireside Room of the Mauthe Center. Featured presenters Assistant Prof. Rebecca Nesvet (English/Humanistic Studies) and Assistant Prof. Alison Staudinger (Democracy & Justice Studies) will lecture on the topic “‘We All Deserve to Die?’: The Ethics of Political Violence in Gothic Storytelling.” Free and open to all. Light refreshments will be served.