UW-Green Bay featured as partner in Ducks Unlimited video

Ducks Unlimited has a focus on Green Bay and UW-Green Bay as a partner. Lower Green Bay is a hub of conservation activity. Coastal wetland projects ring the big water, but a partnership is also working to improve conditions on the bay itself. Wild rice is a historic food source for waterfowl, and Ducks Unlimited and several other organizations are trying innovative methods to re-establish this vegetation in Green Bay.

Watch the full Ducks Unlimited youtube video!

Faculty/staff note: Biodiversity specialist Giese recently published new conservation strategy

Senior Research Specialist Erin Giese recently published a Landbird Habitat Conservation Strategy, along with many co-authors from around the United States. Giese is a Howe Team Coordinator for Great Lakes Coastal Wetland Monitoring, President of the Northeastern Wisconsin Audobon Society, and Advisor of the Green Bay Audobon Student Conservation Chapter. She is a member of the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity.

Read the document to learn more about conservation in the revised 2020 plan.

 

New restoration project looks to improve wildlife and water quality in Northeast Wisconsin

This week, conservation professionals and volunteers from UW-Green Bay, Ducks Unlimited, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and UW-Madison Division of Extension seeded 2,000 pounds of rice across the coastal wetlands of the Bay of Green Bay.

Source: New restoration project looks to improve wildlife and water quality in Northeast Wisconsin, WFRV-TV

Insight Publications | Nuturing nature

The 73-acre Wequiock Creek Natural Area is NEWLT’s latest addition. Nett says she’s worked closely with the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s Cofrin Center for Biodiversity and the Town of Scott to protect the land, which is “an exceptional, archaeologically significant” region. …The land is located adjacent to the Point au Sable peninsula and is part of the 1.9-mile corridor that connects the important Point au Sable coastal wetland to Wequiock Falls. The preserve will provide public recreation activities, trails and bird watching, but it will also offer college students and faculty the ability to conduct research. The preserve is now owned by NEWLT, but Nett says it may be offered to the Town of Scott and UW-Green Bay for their purposes.

Source: Insight Publications | Nuturing nature

Peshtigo River

Green Bay fall wild rice seeding planned for late October

Small teams of conservation professionals and volunteers from UW-Green Bay, Ducks Unlimited, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, UW-Madison Division of Extension, and others will seed 2,000 lbs. of wild rice at coastal wetlands in the bay of Green Bay during the week of October 26-30, 2020.

This year marks the fourth year of seeding effort as part of the restoration projects, informed by UW-Green Bay aquatic vegetation research in lower Green Bay. See past efforts. Wild rice or “manoomin” holds important traditional, economic, and spiritual value in the region for Wisconsin’s First Nation tribes.

Wild rice also benefits waterfowl as an important food source during fall migration and contributes to fish nursery habitat and ecological diversity in coastal wetlands. Historical records suggest the wetland grass occurred in the waters of the bay of Green Bay; however, rice has been uncommon to rare in coastal wetlands and tributaries in recent decades. UW-Green Bay graduate student research helps conservation partners learn more about wild rice seeding success and environmental conditions impacting aquatic vegetation.

Rice re-establishment is one of a series of restoration projects in lower Green Bay and along the Green Bay west shore to enhance coastal wetland habitat for fish and wildlife and improve the health of the bay. Participants will hand seed the rice at 6 sites in lower Green Bay and along the Green Bay west shore on the following dates:

  • Monday, Oct. 26: Green Bay west shore: Seagull Bar State Natural Area and Oconto Marsh Wildlife Area & Oconto Sportsmen’s Club Tuesday
  • Tuesday, Oct. 27: Lower Green Bay: Duck Creek and Ken Euers Nature Area
  • Wednesday, Oct. 28- Suamico: Sensiba Wildlife Area & Barkhausen Waterfowl Preserve
  • Thursday and Friday, Oct. 29 and 30, Weather make-up days

Media members may view seeding from an observation point on land at most locations. All participants and observers will be expected to follow COVID-19 safety guidelines. For more information about the project or the seeding effort, contact Green Bay Restoration Project Coordinator Amy Carrozzino-Lyon (carrozza@uwgb.edu, 920-465-5029).

Join the Green Bay Conservation Partners Spring Roundtable, Wednesday, April 24

Please join us for an exciting event to share information and foster collaboration among conservation practitioners, researchers and stakeholders working in the bay of Green Bay, Lower Fox River Watershed, Green Bay’s west shore and Door Peninsula. The Green Bay Conservation Partners Spring Roundtable will be taking place on Wednesday, April 24, 2019 from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Weidner Center. The morning will kick-off with a series of lightning talks from partners involved in restoration, monitoring and other conservation projects around the region. An interactive roundtable session will follow with discussions on relevant conservation tools and topics. Be sure to check out the student poster session! The event will end with a networking lunch that begins at 12:45 p.m. There is a $20 registration fee to help cover event costs. Coffee, tea, snacks and lunch will be provided. Student fee is $10. Register by Friday, April 19, 2019. If you have questions about this event, please contact Amy Carrozzino-Lyon at carrozza@uwgb.edu or 920-465-5029.

Cofrin Center for Biodiversity shares in $10 million Great Lakes grant

Biologist Bob Howe, professor of Natural and Applied Sciences and director of the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity, and Erin Giese, the Center’s data manager, are UW-Green Bay’s participants in a newly announced, multi-state, multi-university grant of $10 million to monitor coastal wetlands around the Great Lakes Basin over the next five years. This project expands an existing grant that has involved Howe, Giese and more than 20 UW-Green Bay undergraduate and graduate students since 2010. Coordinated by researchers at Central Michigan University, the project allocates $222,000 to support field activities and data analysis by UW-Green Bay staff and students. The basin-wide coastal wetland monitoring program evaluates ongoing and future wetland restoration efforts, as well as fish, invertebrates, birds, amphibians, plant communities, and chemical and physical variables at the majority of coastal wetland areas throughout the Great Lakes basin. Results will be used to prevent further wetland degradation and to set priorities for future wetland protection. Along with Central Michigan and UW-Green Bay, the initiative includes collaborators from the University of Minnesota-Duluth, UW-River Falls, Lake Superior State University, University of Notre Dame, Grand Valley State University, University of Windsor, State University of New York at Brockport, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, U.S. Geological Survey, Environment Canada, and Bird Studies Canada.

Media coverage: UWGB and local efforts to rehabilitate the bay

Despite headlines about a dead zone, phragmites, PCBs and other ailments in the lower bay, local environmentalists found plenty of positives as part of the second annual “Bringing Back the Bay” tour, in which about 80 people got to tour habitat restoration areas along the western shore. Among the sites visited were wetland preservation, northern pike habitat restoration efforts and Cat Island Chain developments that have benefited from UWGB faculty, staff and student involvement. Researchers Patrick Robinson and Tom Prestby were mentioned in a Press-Gazette story.