Join the Green Bay Conservation Partners Spring Roundtable, Wednesday, April 24

Please join us for an exciting event to share information and foster collaboration among conservation practitioners, researchers and stakeholders working in the bay of Green Bay, Lower Fox River Watershed, Green Bay’s west shore and Door Peninsula. The Green Bay Conservation Partners Spring Roundtable will be taking place on Wednesday, April 24, 2019 from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Weidner Center. The morning will kick-off with a series of lightning talks from partners involved in restoration, monitoring and other conservation projects around the region. An interactive roundtable session will follow with discussions on relevant conservation tools and topics. Be sure to check out the student poster session! The event will end with a networking lunch that begins at 12:45 p.m. There is a $20 registration fee to help cover event costs. Coffee, tea, snacks and lunch will be provided. Student fee is $10. Register by Friday, April 19, 2019. If you have questions about this event, please contact Amy Carrozzino-Lyon at carrozza@uwgb.edu or 920-465-5029.

Cofrin Center for Biodiversity shares in $10 million Great Lakes grant

Biologist Bob Howe, professor of Natural and Applied Sciences and director of the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity, and Erin Giese, the Center’s data manager, are UW-Green Bay’s participants in a newly announced, multi-state, multi-university grant of $10 million to monitor coastal wetlands around the Great Lakes Basin over the next five years. This project expands an existing grant that has involved Howe, Giese and more than 20 UW-Green Bay undergraduate and graduate students since 2010. Coordinated by researchers at Central Michigan University, the project allocates $222,000 to support field activities and data analysis by UW-Green Bay staff and students. The basin-wide coastal wetland monitoring program evaluates ongoing and future wetland restoration efforts, as well as fish, invertebrates, birds, amphibians, plant communities, and chemical and physical variables at the majority of coastal wetland areas throughout the Great Lakes basin. Results will be used to prevent further wetland degradation and to set priorities for future wetland protection. Along with Central Michigan and UW-Green Bay, the initiative includes collaborators from the University of Minnesota-Duluth, UW-River Falls, Lake Superior State University, University of Notre Dame, Grand Valley State University, University of Windsor, State University of New York at Brockport, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, U.S. Geological Survey, Environment Canada, and Bird Studies Canada.

Media coverage: UWGB and local efforts to rehabilitate the bay

Despite headlines about a dead zone, phragmites, PCBs and other ailments in the lower bay, local environmentalists found plenty of positives as part of the second annual “Bringing Back the Bay” tour, in which about 80 people got to tour habitat restoration areas along the western shore. Among the sites visited were wetland preservation, northern pike habitat restoration efforts and Cat Island Chain developments that have benefited from UWGB faculty, staff and student involvement. Researchers Patrick Robinson and Tom Prestby were mentioned in a Press-Gazette story.

‘Spawning Run’ to raise funds, awareness of fisheries conservation


The UW-Green Bay student chapter of the American Fisheries Society is hosting its first ever UWGB Spawning Run at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 17. (Great name!) The run will take place on the paths of the Cofrin Arboretum, 3.1 miles. All proceeds from the run benefit American Fisheries Society student research and local habitat restoration projects. Participants will receive a t-shirt with registration and have a chance to participate in a raffle. Awards will be given to the top three finishers. The cost to register is $20 before Oct. 3 and $25 after. Members of the American Fisheries Society as well as UW-Green Bay alumni, students and staff receive a $5 discount. The Spawning Run is being held in conjunction with the third annual Alumni Days on Oct.16 and 17 on the UW-Green Bay campus.

Spawning Run to raise funds, awareness for local fisheries conservation

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay student chapter of the American Fisheries Society is hosting its first ever UWGB Spawning Run at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 17. The run will take place on the UW-Green Bay campus along the paths of the Cofrin Arboretum. The race route is 3.1 miles of winding trails through a campus forest (wood-chipped trails, grass and gravel) beginning and ending behind the Kress Events Center.

All proceeds from the run benefit American Fisheries Society student research and local habitat restoration projects. The American Fisheries Society is the world’s oldest and largest organization dedicated to strengthening the fisheries profession, advancing fisheries science and conserving fisheries resources.

Race day registration and packet pickup begins at 8 a.m. near the starting line. Participants will receive a t-shirt with registration and have a chance to participate in a raffle. Awards will be given to the top three finishers. The cost to register is $20 before Oct. 3 and $25 after. Members of the American Fisheries Society as well as UW-Green Bay alumni, students and staff receive a $5 discount.

The Spawning Run is being held in conjunction with the third annual Alumni Days on Oct.16 and 17 on the UW-Green Bay campus. Following the race, participants can join with the community for “Phoenix Fest,” in the green space between the Kress Events Center and the University Union. Phoenix Fest will be held from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with free food, refreshments and live music. Families can enjoy bounce houses, zip lines, ultimate Frisbee, scavenger hunts, athletics events and more.

Registration is being accepted online. Registration forms are available on the UW-Green Bay campus at the University Union and the Alumni Office, or contact organizer Marian Shaffer. General information can be found on their Facebook page.

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Ribble pushes federal legislation to target ‘dead zones’

U.S. Representative Reid Ribble is a sponsor of H.R. 3120, the Great Lakes Assurance Program Verification Act of 2015, a bill he says would help equip farmers to reduce excess nutrient loading that has seen water bodies including the Bay of Green Bay suffer seasonal “dead zones.” H.R. 3120 would create an initiative for states in the Great Lakes Basin to establish “innovative, proactive programs that help farms of all sizes and all commodities to prevent or minimize agricultural pollution risks.” Ribble has hosted a series of listening sessions and stakeholder meetings prompted in part by highly publicized research – some of it involving UW-Green Bay faculty, students and alumni – showing phosphorous-laden runoff is causing algae blooms and oxygen problems in the bay. If you’re interested in the topic, the Wisconsin State Farmer news site had an ag-centric view of Ribble’s project posted online. The piece quotes experts including local dairyman Gordon Spiers and UWGB watershed specialist Prof. Kevin Fermanich of Natural and Applied Sciences.

Door wetlands (including UWGB’s at Toft Point) get prestigious designation


Door County conservation partners including UW-Green Bay were pleased to announce earlier this week that the Door Peninsula Coastal Wetlands complex has been designated a Wetland of International Importance under the Ramsar Convention, an intergovernmental treaty for protection of exemplary wetland systems around the world. The site joins Everglades National Park in Florida and Chesapeake Bay Estuary as the only American location. The lands in question encompass more than 22 miles of protected Lake Michigan shoreline and protects some of the most biologically diverse habitats in the region from wet forests, sedge meadows and fens to springs, creeks and interdunal wetlands. UW-Green Bay, of course, manages the Toft Point property near Bailey’s Harbor. Fox-11 TV had a beautifully-done video report.

Wilson-Doenges talks psychology of conservation


In celebration of Earth Day, environmental psychologist Georjeanna Wilson-Doenges hosts a two-minute video with some of her students in which they talk about the role of psychology in conservation efforts. The Psychology program has a new course in Conservation Psychology and a new emphasis in Sustainability.