Citation for Larry Weyers

Also receiving a Chancellor’s Award at Saturday’s UW-Green Bay Commencement was longtime former Wisconsin Public Service and Integrys executive Larry L. Weyers. In presenting the award, Chancellor Tom Harden said of Weyers, “Whether as private citizen, generous community advocate or influential corporate executive, he has distinguished himself as a remarkable supporter of UW-Green Bay and its students.” For a photo and more.

Citation for Mike Kline

Popular and respected UW-Green Bay staff member Mike Kline heard cheers and applause at Saturday’s UW-Green Bay commencement when he was presented with the Chancellor’s Award. Said Harden, “As coach of the Phoenix cross-country teams, (Mike) has influenced a generation of college athletes to dedicate themselves to their sport and to their teammates. As academic coordinator for our Division I sports program, he has impressed faculty and staff with his absolute devotion to ensuring that every student realizes the best of a UW-Green Bay education. Finally, as a friend and colleague, he has impressed many of us with the power of hard work, optimism and, always, a smile.”

Chancellor’s Awards will go to Kline, Liebs, Weyers

Chancellor Thomas K. Harden has selected four individuals to receive UW-Green Bay’s highest community honor, the Chancellor’s Award, in recognition of outstanding lifetime contributions to the institution. The awards will be made at commencement, 11:30 a.m. Saturday (May 17) at the Kress Events Center. This year’s honorees:
Mike Kline is a 1988 graduate of UW-Green Bay who has served his alma mater and community for three decades as employee, volunteer and advocate. Chancellor Harden says he wanted to honor Kline, the first active employee in school history to receive the Chancellor’s Award, for his tireless energy and “absolute devotion to this University and to our students. He is wonderful ambassador and recruiter for UW-Green Bay.” Kline is entering his 28th season as Phoenix cross-country coach; in 1999 he accepted additional duties as academics coordinator for all Phoenix teams.
Janet and Charlie Lieb have been dedicated, hands-on difference makers for UW-Green Bay’s Phuture Phoenix program. The Liebs were among the first community volunteers to sign on in support, have helped expand offerings into area middle and high schools, and have endowed the Janet and Charles Lieb Phuture Phoenix Scholarship. Both Janet, a 1993 UW-Green Bay grad, and Charlie, longtime president of PDQ Manufacturing, Inc., and chairman of the Green Bay Packers Foundation committee, are active in support of a number of non-profits and community causes.
Larry L. Weyers, the former CEO and president of Wisconsin Public Service Corp. and Integrys Energy Group, supported University initiatives including the construction of Mary Ann Cofrin Hall as a national showcase for energy efficiency. WPS organized the “Solar Olympics,” sponsored a solar research station on campus, and supported faculty and student research. Weyers and his wife, Lois, have supported the Phuture Phoenix pre-college program, Weidner Center revitalization and more.
For photos and more details on each of this year’s Chancellor’s Award recipients.

UW-Green Bay to present community honor to Kline, Liebs, Weyers

Chancellor Thomas K. Harden has selected four individuals to receive UW-Green Bay’s highest community honor, the Chancellor’s Award, at May 2014 commencement in recognition of outstanding lifetime contributions to the institution. They are Mike Kline, Janet and Charlie Lieb, and Larry L. Weyers.

The awards will be made early in the program during the commencement ceremony that will begin at 11:30 a.m. this Saturday (May 17) at the Kress Events Center on campus.

kline-2Mike Kline is a 1988 graduate of UW-Green Bay who has served his alma mater and community for three decades as employee, volunteer and advocate. Chancellor Harden says he wanted to honor Kline, the first active employee in school history to receive the Chancellor’s Award, for his tireless energy and “absolute devotion to this University and to our students. He is a wonderful ambassador and recruiter for UW-Green Bay.”

Kline was a returning adult student when then-athletics director Dan Spielmann hired him as part-time coach of the Phoenix men’s and women’s cross country teams in 1987. Kline stayed on as coach after graduating with a triple major in Human Development, Psychology and Philosophy. This fall’s Phoenix cross country squad will be his 28th.

In 1999, Kline accepted additional duties as academics coordinator for all Phoenix teams. Supervising study tables, monitoring grades and counseling and cajoling those who need it, he’s helped the program achieve 30 consecutive semesters of cumulative grade point averages above 3.0, winning the respect of faculty and staff as well as other NCAA Division I programs.

liebsJanet and Charlie Lieb have been dedicated, hands-on difference makers for UW-Green Bay’s signature Phuture Phoenix program. The initiative encourages local fifth-graders by providing campus tours and follow-up programming, pairing them with college-age mentors, and motivating them to graduate from high school and pursue higher education. The Liebs were among the first community volunteers to sign on in support.

They continue to be dedicated volunteers, both during the annual Phuture Phoenix tour days on campus and in the offshoots and start-ups that have extended the program into area middle and high schools. Additionally, the Liebs endowed the Janet and Charles Lieb Phuture Phoenix Scholarship, which provides assistance for UW-Green Bay students who participated in the program as children.

Both Janet, a 1993 UW-Green Bay grad, and Charlie, longtime president of PDQ Manufacturing, Inc., and chairman of the Green Bay Packers Foundation committee, are active in support of a number of non-profits and community causes, including UW-Green Bay Athletics, but they make Phuture Phoenix a priority.

weyers-larry-2Larry L. Weyers has distinguished himself as a strong supporter of UW-Green Bay and its students, whether as private citizen, generous community advocate or influential corporate executive.

When Weyers was CEO and president of Wisconsin Public Service Corp. and, later, Integrys Energy Group, the regional utility WPS was among the first companies to earn the UW Regents’ Partnership Award for its work with UW-Green Bay. Weyers and WPS helped power University initiatives including the construction of Mary Ann Cofrin Hall as a national showcase for energy-efficient technology. WPS organized an annual “Solar Olympics” for local high schools and sponsored a solar research station on campus, and supported faculty and student research.

Weyers and his wife, Lois, have been active philanthropists, as well. From the Phuture Phoenix pre-college program to the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts, their interests have spanned a range of University activities and offerings. The couple made a major pledge in support of the revitalization of the Weidner Center and the objective of increasing the number of both local and touring productions. Larry Weyers has volunteered his time to assist major capital fundraising for the University.

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Dhein accepts UW-Green Bay Chancellor’s Award

Chancellor's Award recipient, Steve Dhein

Steve Dhein of Green Bay was presented the Chancellor’s Award, UW-Green Bay’s highest community honor, at spring commencement May 18 on campus.

Dhein accepted the award from Chancellor Tom Harden in front of an audience of about 5,000 at the Kress Events Center.

Dhein is chief adviser to the higher-education-friendly 1923 Fund and 1883 Fund charitable trusts. The philanthropic foundations were established by the late Dr. David A. Cofrin, who in the founding documents identified 16 organizations that he considered “particularly deserving,” including UW-Green Bay and the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity.

“Like Dr. Cofrin, Steve believes in philanthropy that is participatory, not passive,” Harden said in presenting the award. “He works closely with partner organizations to ensure that good programs become great ones … that resources are maximized to achieve the highest and best results.”

Harden noted that Dhein has been an engaged and active presence with UW-Green Bay natural areas, scientific research, the Theatre program and the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts, among others.

“At this University, at St. Vincent Hospital in Green Bay, with the nearby Baird Creek Preservation Foundation, with a range of organizations both local and national, (Steve’s) is a positive presence,” Harden said. “But he consistently challenges us to maintain a very high standard, as befits both the Family and Foundations whose charitable funds he helps direct.”

Dhein to receive UW-Green Bay community award

Steve Dhein of Green Bay will be presented the Chancellor’s Award, UW-Green Bay’s highest community honor, in recognition of his sustained commitment to the University and the region it serves.

Dhein will accept the award from Chancellor Tom Harden during spring 2013 commencement at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, May 18 at the Kress Events Center on campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

Dhein is chief adviser to the higher-education-friendly 1923 Fund and 1883 Fund charitable trusts. The philanthropic foundations were established by the late Dr. David A. Cofrin, who in the founding documents identified 16 organizations that he considered “particularly deserving,” including UW-Green Bay and the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity.

While the funds have provided important support for the University, Dhein also has extended that financial philanthropy to personal involvement. He is an engaged and active presence with UW-Green Bay natural areas, scientific research, the Theatre and Dance program and the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts, among others.

A native of West Bend, Dhein holds a bachelor’s in agricultural economics from UW-Madison. He worked in computing and technology before being approached by Dr. Cofrin in 2004 to serve as co-adviser of the 1923 Fund. The 1883 Fund was created in 2008, and Dhein became chief adviser of both funds one year later upon the passing of Dr. Cofrin.

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Warm ovation and Chancellor’s Award for Hinckleys

Hinckleys receive the Chancellor's Award
Dr. James and Patricia Hinckley received a warm welcome when they were invited up on the platform near the beginning of UW-Green Bay commencement ceremonies May 12 at the Kress Events Center.

The Green Bay couple was recognized with the institution’s highest community honor, the Chancellor’s Award. Their relationship with the University dates to the late 1970s and includes substantial involvement with, and support of, the University’s academic mission, the fine arts and Phoenix Athletics.

Chancellor Thomas K. Harden, in honoring the Hinckleys, called them “perfect teammates for the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and its students.”

James Hinckley Sports Medicine CenterHe noted that Dr. Hinckley has been a familiar figure on the bench at soccer and basketball games both home and away for more than 30 years, volunteering his time as Phoenix team physician. (The Chancellor elicited smiles when he added, “He sometimes volunteered his advice to the referees, as well, but we won’t get into that today.”)

Dr. Jim Hinckley is a member of the UW-Green Bay Athletics Hall of Fame. The training and sports medicine area at the Kress is named the James Hinckley Sports Medicine Center in his honor.

Patricia Hinckley is a former teacher and gifted and talented coordinator for Ashwaubenon High School. She supplemented her master’s degree preparation with secondary education certification at UW-Green Bay. In 2008 the Hinckleys endowed a UW-Green Bay scholarship fund — one of the University’s largest — in Patricia’s name, with preference to women student athletes pursuing careers related to mathematics, science or education.

The couple’s philanthropy on behalf of the University began in 1981 with generous annual contributions to the Founders Association for student scholarships and academic enhancements. They later became active supporters of the Phoenix Fund for athletics, and the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts.

(Jim Hinckley poses, below, before the ceremony with friends and former UW-Green Bay Phoenix Athletics administrators Dan Spielmann and Jeanne Stangel.)

Hinckleys receive the Chancellor's Award

Hinckleys to receive Chancellor’s Award from UW-Green Bay

Dr. James and Patricia Hinckley of Green Bay will be recognized at UW-Green Bay spring commencement this Saturday, May 12, with the institution’s highest community honor, the Chancellor’s Award.

The couple will be presented the award by Chancellor Thomas K. Harden during ceremonies that begin at 11:30 a.m. at the Kress Events Center.

The Hinckleys’ relationship with the University dates to the late 1970s and includes substantial involvement with, and support of, the University’s academic mission, the fine arts and Phoenix Athletics.

They are best known for their enthusiastic support of intercollegiate athletics. An orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Hinckley has devoted time, medical expertise and philanthropic support to the Phoenix since 1978. His close working relationship with the program began with the men’s soccer teams under the direction of his friend, former coach Aldo Santaga. Hinckley offered his time to provide team physicals and a medical presence on the bench at both home and away games. That role grew to include other teams — basketball, in particular — and he continued that volunteer service over three decades as medical consultant, team physician and as a mentor to many of the program’s student trainers.

He is a member of the UW-Green Bay Athletics Hall of Fame. Prior to the opening of the University’s new Kress Events Center in 2007, it was decided to honor him by naming the training and sports medicine area of the facility the James Hinckley Sports Medicine Center.

Patricia Hinckley is a former teacher and gifted and talented coordinator for Ashwaubenon High School, where her social studies team won a local Golden Apple Award for excellence in education. She is active in the American Association of University Women. She supplemented her master’s degree preparation with secondary education certification at UW-Green Bay and served three years on the Founders Association Board of Directors during that time. In 2008 the Hinckleys endowed a UW-Green Bay scholarship fund — one of the University’s largest — in Patricia’s name, with preference to women student athletes pursuing careers related to mathematics, science or education.

The couple’s philanthropy on behalf of the University began in 1981 with generous annual contributions to the Founders Association for student scholarships and academic enhancements. They later became active supporters of the Phoenix Fund for athletics, and the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts. Their involvement has occasionally had an element of fun, as well: Jim Hinckley allowed Phoenix basketball players to shave his head and 30-year beard at midcourt of the Kress Center when the team and its fans met a “Pink Zone” challenge to raise money for cancer awareness and research.

Dr. Hinckley is a longtime affiliate of Prevea Health Ashwaubenon. A graduate of the University of Illinois College of Medicine, he received training in orthopedics and sports medicine while serving eight years on active duty with the U.S. Navy before coming to Green Bay.

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UW-Green Bay friend Sandmire publishes autobiography

Making a Difference: One Man’s Journey is the title chosen by award-winning medical doctor Herbert Sandmire for his new book. The autobiography covers Dr. Sandmire’s 50-plus years in obstetrics and includes personal observations from his days growing up as the son of a tenant farmer to his receiving the 2010 Distinguished Service Award presented by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. He also reminisces about being an Air Force medical officer in Alaska, and delivering babies for thewives of Green Bay Packers players. (Jim Taylor fainted; Bart Starr did not.)

Sandmire and his wife, Crystal, received UW-Green Bay’s highest community honor, the Chancellor’s Award, at May commencement in 2006. Dr. Sandmire was a community lecturer in Human Biology from the institution’s inception, in 1968, to 1989. Crystal Sandmire, who earned a degree in Communication and the Arts at UW-Green Bay in 1980, was a charter member and officer of the Founders Association. Records indicate that, at 42 years and counting, they have the longest uninterrupted string of annual giving for private individuals who help support the University and its students.

For a link to Tuesday’s Green Bay Press-Gazette column about Sandmire’s autobiography, a photo of the couple, and more, click here.

 

UW-Green Bay friend Sandmire publishes autobiography

Making a Difference: One Man’s Journey is the title chosen by award-winning medical doctor Herbert Sandmire for his new book.

The autobiography covers Dr. Sandmire’s 50-plus years in obstetrics and includes personal observations from his days growing up as the son of a tenant farmer to receiving the 2010 Distinguished Service Award presented by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. He also writes about being an Air Force medical officer in Alaska, and delivering babies for the wives of Green Bay Packers players. (Note: Jim Taylor fainted; Bart Starr did not.)

The book is spotlighted in Dian Page’s column in the Tuesday, Aug. 2, edition of the Green Bay Press-Gazetteclick here to read more.

Sandmire and his wife, Crystal, received the University’s highest community honor, the Chancellor’s Award, at May commencement in 2006. Then-chancellor Bruce Shepard said the Sandmires “illustrate the tremendous, positive force that engaged citizens can be for a developing university.”

Dr. Herb and Crystal Sandmire with student scholarship recipients
Dr. Herb and Crystal Sandmire mingled with student scholarship recipients at a UW-Green Bay reception. (2007 file photo)

The Sandmires have supported UW-Green Bay since its inception more than 40 years ago. Dr. Sandmire was a community lecturer in Human Biology at UW-Green Bay from 1968 to 1989. Crystal Sandmire, who earned a degree in Communication and the Arts at UW-Green Bay in 1980, was a charter member of the UW-Green Bay Founders Association. She served on its executive committee and was an officer.

The couple also holds distinction among the thousands who make annual financial contributions to UW-Green Bay. Records indicate that, at 42 years and counting, they have the longest uninterrupted string of annual giving for private individuals who help support the University and its students.

They established the Dr. Herbert and Crystal Sandmire Scholarship at UW-Green Bay. Additionally their gifts to the University have assisted various athletics initiatives, the Founders Association, the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts, two capital campaigns, and the Phuture Phoenix program.

Dr. Sandmire has had a long career in medicine devoted to serving patients, scholarship in and service to the profession, and the development of future physicians. In 1971, Sandmire founded Green Bay’s Planned Parenthood Clinic that provides young women with privacy and guidance in matters of contraception and pregnancy. “Our medical clinic’s continued provision of women’s reproductive services has not come without protest — our offices have been picketed regularly for the past 37 years,” he says.

In the Press-Gazette article, he noted the remarkable changes in medicine since his med-school enrollment in 1949.

“When I walked through the doors of the University of Wisconsin Medical School for the first time … we didn’t even know the structure of DNA,” he says. “Sixty years later, the entire human genome has been mapped.”

A copy of Making a Difference: One Man’s Journey can be obtained for $19 by writing Sandmire at 201 St. Mary’s Blvd., Green Bay, WI 54301.