Spring Elder Hours begin on Feb. 10

Spring Elder Hours on the Green Bay Campus will begin on Monday, Feb. 10 and will go through Saturday, May 9, 2020. All are welcome to attend and ask questions or simply listen to the elders; no appointments are necessary. Elder hours take place in Wood Hall 410. If you have any questions, please contact Cultural Resource Specialist Bailey Tlachac at tlacba11@uwgb.edu. Below is the weekly schedule.

Mondays: Napos, noon to 2 p.m. and 3:45 to 5:15 p.m.
Wednesdays: Georgia Burr, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Napos, 1 to 2 p.m. and 3:45 to 5:15 p.m.
Thursdays: Laura Cornelius, 9 a.m. to noon.

First Nations students meet with Department of Public Instruction

On May 17, 2019, students in the First Nations Studies Seminar (FNS 391) traveled to Madison to present to officials at the Department of Public Instruction. Students in the course had spent the semester learning about state laws requiring instruction in the history, culture, and tribal sovereignty of the federally recognized tribes and bands in Wisconsin in K-12 schools and teacher education programs, requirements commonly known as “Act 31.”  State Superintendent Carolyn Stanford Taylor, members of her cabinet, and program staff in American Indian Studies, Social Studies, and other programs listened attentively as UW-Green Bay students Dolly Potts, Elizabeth Howard, Crystal Danforth, Ana Olp, Holly Daniels, Nate Bowman, and Marla Mahkimetas, shared their policy research and recommendations related to instructional materials, preservice teacher education, in-service teacher professional development, systemic capacity issues, and examples of success in other states. These students will be following up to share a written report with their complete findings. fns 391 to DPI spring 2019 copyDPI staff members have already been invited them to serve as partners and reviewers on several projects in progress.

In the photo: Left to right, back row: Tamara Mouw (Dir. Content and Learning Team); Crystal Danforth, Elizabeth Howard, J P Leary, David O’Connor (American Indian Studies Consultant). Middle row Ana Olp, Marla Mahkimetas, State Superintendent Carolyn Stanford Taylor, Dr. Sheila Briggs (Asst. State Superintendent for Academic Excellence), Kris McDaniel (Social Studies Consultant). Front Row, Holly Daniels, Nate Bowman, Dolly Potts, Connie Ellingson (Office Operations Associate)

Elder Hours schedule for Fall 2018 — all are welcome

The UW-Green Bay Education Center for First Nations Studies invites all students, staff, faculty and community members to visit the First Nations Oral Scholars in Residence this Fall. The Oral Scholars in Residence program offers an opportunity to learn from First Nations Elders in an informal setting through storytelling and everyday conversation.

Fall 2018 Elder Hours

Sept. 17, 2018 through Dec. 14, 2018

  • Monday: 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Napos
  • Tuesday: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Leah Miller
  • Wednesday: 10 a.m. – 1 p.m., Georgia Bur and 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Napos
  • Thursday: 12 p.m. to 3 p.m., Dr. Carol Cornelius

J.P. Leary featured as guest on WPR

UW-Green Bay Associate Professor J.P. Leary (First Nations Studies) was featured on an WPR episode titled “How teaching native history and culture in Wisconsin’s schools became law.” The episode looks into the era before and after Act 31, the law that brought Native American history to schools in Wisconsin.

Faculty note: Associate Prof. J.P. Leary examines story of Act 31

Among the books featured by the Brown County Library this week and highlighted in the Green Bay Press-Gazette is “The Story of Act 31: How Native History Came to Wisconsin Classrooms” by UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. JP Leary (First Nations Education). Leary begins by looking at 1800s treaties and state interference, offering background to more recent legal battles regarding Act 31.

Faculty note: JP Leary shares expertise at NCORE Conference

Leary
JP Leary with author and educator Victor Lewis.

UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. JP Leary (First Nations Studies) presented in three sessions and had a book signing at the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity Ethnicity (NCORE) in New Orleans May 29 through June 2, 2018. This conference is the leading conference on race and ethnicity in higher education, and this year attracted nearly 4,000 attendees. His new book, “The Story of Act 31: How Native History Came to Wisconsin Classrooms” was well received. He is pictured signing books with author and educator Victor Lewis. His expertise was shared on a panel for a session titled, “Indigenizing College Access: Perspectives on the Work,” on May 30 and in presenting a session titled, “The Story of Act 31: How Native History Came to Wisconsin Classrooms” on May 31. In the later, he discussed his recently published book, the research process that went into it, and some of the interesting things he found along the way. He also presented a shortened version of his book talk at the Native Delegation to NCORE (NDNCORE) caucus meeting, May 30.

NBC26 reports on First Nations Doctorate

UW-Green Bay’s new First Nations doctoral program will launch in Fall 2018. It is also the first of its kind in the state. Associate Prof. Lisa Poupart (First Nation Studies) told NBC26, “Our first doctoral degree is a recognition of that tradition of honoring indigenous people.”

“They start with introductory courses, like an introductory course in First Nations education and include courses in First Nations law and policy, sovereignty,” Poupart said.

From there, students can take higher level courses of greater depth.

“Our students will be working and training to address issues of concern in the surrounding communities, and that called for a need to do research and address those kinds of concerns, and thus the courses in grant writing for example, or statistics so students can generate research and apply for grants,” Poupart said.

Prof. Poupart talks First Nations Ed.D. on WHBY

“UW-Green Bay is offering its first doctoral program, and it will also be the first in the state to focus on Native American education. UW-Green Bay Prof. Lisa Poupart is the director of the First Nations Education program. She says it’s a perfect fit, because the University has had a longstanding commitment to Native American cultures. WHBY had the story.

Elder hours available to UW-Green Bay community

The UW-Green Bay Education Center for First Nations Studies invites all students, staff, faculty and community members to visit the First Nations Oral Scholars in Residence. The Oral Scholars in Residence program offers an opportunity to learn from First Nations Elders in an informal setting through storytelling and everyday conversation. Spring 2018 Elder Hours will be the week of Feb. 5 through May 11, 2018:

Mondays: Napos, 12:30 to 2 p.m. and 3:45 to 5:15 p.m.
Wednesdays: Georgia Burr, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and Napos 12:30 to 2 p.m. and 3:45 to 5:15 p.m.
Thursday: Susan Daniels, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Oral Traditional Scholars in Residence hosting public hours

The UW-Green Bay Education Center for First Nations Studies invites all students, staff faculty, and community members to visit the First Nations Oral Scholars in Residence. The program offers an opportunity to learn from First Nations Elders in an informal setting through storytelling and everyday conversation. Elder hours begin this week (Oct. 8-13) and run through Dec. 14:

Mondays: 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. with Judge Ackley; 12:30 p.m. to  3:30 p.m. with Napos
Tuesdays: Noon to 3 p.m. with Dr. Cornelius
Wednesdays: 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. with Napos