Common CAHSS

‘The Civil Rights Movement meets the Environmental Movement: How We Can Advocate for Environmental Justice’

Green Bay, Wis.—University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Associate Prof. Elizabeth Wheat will discuss environmental justice and its relationship to civil rights in a presentation, Thursday, Oct. 22 at 4 p.m. It is free and open to the public and can be accessed at https://cahsseffect.org/events/.

According to the event description, Wheat will be diving into the environmental justice movement in the United States that began in 1982 when residents of Warren County, North Carolina, used non-violent tactics to oppose the siting of a toxic PCB landfill in their mainly African American community. Decades later, Sheila Holt described her family’s health struggles after the government of Dickson, Tennessee, protected white families from polluted drinking water but told her and other Black families that the water was safe. She inspired countless of other people to think of environmental issues as human rights issues that must be addressed through confronting systemic racism.

“As I see protests in 2020 bringing many of the environmental justice crises into a bigger public discussion, I hope we can think beyond traditional environmental and sustainability challenges and really start addressing the core issues of racism that magnify existing environmental problems,” Wheat says.

Wheat is the second in a speaker series brought to both campus and community as part of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences 2020-21 theme, “Beyond Sustainability.” Professor David J. Voelker (Humanities, History), co-chair and program director said this theme is especially timely…

“The Covid-19 pandemic and the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement, which have cast intense light on the challenges that we face as a society, provide especially poignant contexts to address the theme of ‘Beyond Sustainability: Imagining an Ecological Future,’” Voelker says. “We need a more robust framework than “environmental sustainability” to address the interrelated environmental and social crises that we now face. The word ‘environment’ draws a line of separation between humans and the rest of the community of life. We have been talking about sustainability for decades, but we’ve made little progress on addressing unsustainability,” Voelker said. “I hope that the conference theme helps us as a community to imagine something beyond ‘environmental sustainability’—an ecologically sound and just society.”

The College of Arts, Humanities and Social Science will also host a virtual week around the theme, Nov. 30, 2020 through December 4, 2020.

Prof. Wheat to lead environmental justice/civil rights presentation, Thursday, Oct. 22

UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Elizabeth Wheat will discuss environmental justice and its relationship to civil rights in a presentation, Thursday, Oct. 22 at 4 p.m. It is free and open to the public and can be accessed at https://cahsseffect.org/events/.

According to the event description, Wheat will be diving into the environmental justice movement in the United States that began in 1982 when residents of Warren County, North Carolina, used non-violent tactics to oppose the siting of a toxic PCB landfill in their mainly African American community. Decades later, Sheila Holt described her family’s health struggles after the government of Dickson, Tennessee, protected white families from polluted drinking water but told her and other Black families that the water was safe. She inspired countless of other people to think of environmental issues as human rights issues that must be addressed through confronting systemic racism.

CAHSS and Effect upcoming events from the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Please consider tuning into these CAHSS and Effect events:

Philosophers Café
October 14 @ 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Emily Ransom returns to the Café to explore what may be gained or lost in a holistic approach to education and cultural engagement. 

Curiosity by CAHSS LIVE
October 14 @ 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Alan Chu (Assistant Professor, Psychology and Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology), Rebecca Nesvet (Associate Professor, English), Jennifer Young (Associate Professor, English), Chris Williams (Associate Professor, English) are all part of this presentation.

Next up for COMMON CAHSS: Beyond Sustainability
The Civil Rights Movement meets the Environmental Movement: How we can advocate for Environmental Justice

October 22 @ 4 to 5 p.m.
Elizabeth Wheat is an associate professor in Public and Environmental Affairs, Political Science, Environmental Science, and Policy. She will be speaking about traditional environmental and sustainability challenges and start addressing the core issues of racism that magnify existing environmental problems.

More from CAHSS and Effect, including live events, podcast, news and more including senior Theatre major Faith Klick performing “All Falls Down” from the musical Chaplin.

Prof. Vince Lowery to deliver CAHSS Virtual Conference Keynote

UW-Green Bay’s Director of Student Success and Engagement, Prof. Vince Lowery, will deliver the Virtual Keynote, “How HIP Is Your Education? High Impact Practices and the World You’re Preparing For” to kick off the CAHSS Virtual Conference. Join the Zoom Meeting May 4, 2020 from 11 to 11:30 a.m. More at www.cahsseffect.org.

 

Reminder: UW-Green Bay’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences to host a virtual conference, May 4-15

During the weeks of May 4 and May 11, the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (CAHSS, pronounced “cause”) will host a Virtual Conference to showcase the student work from across the semester. Whether it’s original research, musical performances, compositions or poems, or a host of other projects, students from CAHSS have been working hard all semester long and organizers want to provide a space to share that work with the public.

On May 4, 2020, www.cahsseffect.org will be replaced by CAHSS Virtual for the last two weeks of the semester. This virtual space will provide a venue for student presentations, music, research posters, written works, and other sorts of presentations and performances along with opportunities for synchronous presentations via Blackboard Collaborate Ultra. To learn more, follow uwgbcahss on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

UW-Green Bay’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences to host a virtual conference, May 4-15

During the weeks of May 4 and May 11, the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (CAHSS, pronounced “cause”) will host a Virtual Conference to showcase the student work from across the semester. Whether it’s original research, musical performances, compositions or poems, or a host of other projects, students from CAHSS have been working hard all semester long and organizers want to provide a space to share that work with the public.

On May 4, 2020, www.cahsseffect.org will be replaced by CAHSS Virtual for the last two weeks of the semester. This virtual space will provide a venue for student presentations, music, research posters, written works, and other sorts of presentations and performances along with opportunities for synchronous presentations via Blackboard Collaborate Ultra. To learn more, follow uwgbcahss on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Dean Chuck Ryback recommends listening to Epistolary Rap

Prof. and CAHSS Dean Chuck Ryback recommends listening to Epistolary Rap during this crazy time. Prof. Ryback writes, “If you’re not familiar with ‘epistolary’ as a word or form, it means that something is written in the form of a letter. So that’s what we’re talking about here: two rap songs whose lyrics come to you in the form of a letter written from one person to another, and sometimes you’ll even get the response. GET TO IT ALREADY! I hear you. The two songs you should be listening to are ‘One Love’ by Nas and ‘Stan’ by Eminem. These are standouts of the form not just in rap, but in any genre.” Read more of Prof. Ryback’s recommendation via CAHSS and Effect.

Prof. Van Slooten makes her monthly romance novel recommendations for CAHSS and Effect

Associate Prof. Jessica Van Slooten (English, Women and Gender Studies) makes her monthly romance novel recommendations: “Romance fiction’s promise of a happy, emotionally satisfying ending has always been one of its selling points for readers. I don’t know about you, but I need that reassurance now more than ever. And while romance fiction contains multitudes—including romantic suspense and high angst/drama—I’m craving sweeter, lighter emotionally satisfying novels at the moment. This month I share with you the best novel I’ve read in 2020, Kate Clayborn’s Love Lettering, a contemporary, male-female romance that delivers a sweet and sexy story in a creative and gorgeous package.”

Canonball Episode 11: Michelangelo’s David with Sam Watson

In this episode of Canonball, Ryan Martin and Chuck Rybak talk with Sam Watson about Michelangelo’s sculpture of David. Canonball is a podcast out of Phoenix Studios at UW-Green Bay that covers the great works from a variety of disciplines. From movies to film to literature to video games, hosts Chuck Rybak and Ryan Martin discusses all things canonical. Watch here.