Common CAHSS keynote is Nov. 30

November 30, 2020 from 6 to 7 p.m. Prof. David Voelker (Humanities, History) leads the discussion, Beyond Sustainability; Imagining an Ecological Future. Here’s a description:

“It’s time for an honest conversation about sustainability—not to demolish the concept, but to recognize that it has fallen short in helping us change our unsustainable ways. Although the dominant models of sustainability in theory recognize that environmental problems are entangled with economic and social justice issues, in practice sustainability efforts have tended to focus rather narrowly on what we usually call “the environmental impact” of our activities. We have thus failed to transcend not only the polluting energy systems of the past two centuries but also the economic and ideological systems that see unlimited growth as the only viable option. Unsustainability is not simply a technical problem that can be solved through technological means. To mitigate the multiple environmental crises into which we are rushing, we need to reconsider our roles on this living planet as human beings. Can we imagine an ecological future in which we thrive as members of the larger community of life?”  See more on the Common CAHSS page.

UW-Green Bay Theatre & Dance produce two original virtual shows in time for the holidays

GREEN BAY – The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Theatre & Dance program will offer two virtual performances in December. The first, a world premiere of an original drama entitled: Faithfall will premiere on Dec. 3 at 7 p.m. Pre-show interviews and a post-show discussion on the play’s themes will provide additional insights. The second performance, Only for Now, a musical revue will premiere on Dec. 10 at 7 p.m. Both shows will be broadcast on the Weidner Center’s YouTube site free of charge.

Faithfall is the story of Whitney Long, a young woman struggling with grief over the suicide of her estranged sister, a nun. Following the funeral, Whitney meets Father Michael, the young priest who knew Whitney’s sister. With Father Michael’s guidance, Whitney embarks on a journey to gain a greater understanding of her grief, beliefs, and relationship with her sister. A poignant story of faith and love in times of crisis, Faithfall was written by UW-Green Bay Theatre Associate Professor Thomas Campbell. The production is being directed by John Mariano and will feature Allie Lent as Whitney Long and Sean Stalvey as Father Michael. Lent is a senior from Albany, Wis. majoring in theatre. Stalvey is a senior from Manitowoc, Wis. majoring in theatre. Earlier this year, Faithfall had a staged reading at the Texas A&M University-Commerce but this will be the world-premiere production of the show.

The broadcast of Faithfall will include pre-show interviews and a post-show discussion. The pre-show talk feature playwright Thomas Campbell discussing his inspiration for the story and insights into his writing process. The post-show talk will be a panel discussion with psychology and mental health community leaders and professors. The panel will discuss coping with grief, suicide prevention and stress management and offer professional opinions and information on community resources.

The second production, Only for Now, is a musical revue featuring an ensemble of theatre, dance students. It will premiere online on Thursday, Dec. 10 at 7 p.m. The production is being directed by Laura Riddle with musical direction by Courtney Sherman and choreography by Denise Carlson-Gardner. The title of the show is also the closing song of the revue and is from the Broadway musical Avenue Q. According to director Laura Riddle, the title is also a nod to the current nature of education and theatre during a global pandemic. In addition to the song from Avenue Q, the revue will also feature songs from a wide variety of Broadway shows including: Guys and Dolls, A Chorus Line, Hairspray, and Les Misérables. The selections in the revue were chosen to highlight what it means to be a performing artist and inspire hope for the future. Cast members include Mason Amidon, Connor Anderson, Isabelle Austgen, Jasmine Christyne, Hayley Eastman, Alyssa Hannam, Faith Klick, Grace Kolb, Rhean Krueger, Cory J. O’Donnell, Autumn Rettke, Aisa Rogers, Liesl Sigourney, Annie Skorupa, Olivia Smith, Audrey Soberg, Aubrey Stein, and Ally Stokes.

Out of concern for the health and well-being of the audience, actors, and production crew, theatre and dance performances for the semester are being filmed and presented for viewing rather than livestreamed or presented as a traditional live performances. Please be advised that Faithfallfocuses on issues of suicide and has adult content and themes. Only for Now contains strong language and adult content. Both productions are recommended for mature audiences.

Faithfall will premiere online on Thursday, Dec. 3 at 7 p.m. with the recorded pre-show beginning at 6:30 and is part of the Common CAHSS: Beyond Sustainability virtual conference. The production will then be available for viewing through Tuesday, Dec. 8. Only for Now will premiere online on Thursday, Dec. 10 at 7 p.m. and will be available for viewing through Tuesday, Dec. 15. There is no charge to view the productions but donations in support of scholarships for Theatre & Dance students are welcomed and can be made by visiting: https://www.uwgb.edu/theatre/become-a-theatre-first-nighter/.

About the Weidner Center

UW-Green Bay’s Weidner Center for the Performing Arts is known for its elegant design and the acoustic excellence of its 2,000-seat main hall, Cofrin Family Hall. It also houses two smaller performance spaces, the Fort Howard recital hall and the Jean Weidner Theatre, along with a dance studio and Grand Foyer. The Center is a home for UW-Green Bay Music and Theatre and Dance productions, community events and productions, and performances by visiting artists and touring companies. The Weidner Center has a distinct benefit in being part of a leading institution of higher learning. Beyond the large-scale touring productions that grace the stage, the Weidner Center also focuses on scholastic development, programming and an impactful education series – Stage Doors. The Stage Doors Education Series serves more than17,500 students from 63 cities throughout Wisconsin and Michigan’s Upper Peninsula every year. For more information on the Weidner Center, visit www.WeidnerCenter.com, 920-465-2726, 800-895-0071, or follow the ‘Weidner Center for the Performing Arts’ on Facebook, Twitter (@WeidnerCenter) and Instagram (@weidnercenter).

About the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is a comprehensive public institution offering undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs to more than 8,500 students with campus locations in Green Bay, Marinette, Manitowoc and Sheboygan. Established in 1965 on the border of Green Bay, the University and its campuses are centers of cultural enrichment, innovation and learning. The Green Bay campus is home to one of the Midwest’s most prolific performing arts centers, a nationally recognized 4,000-seat student recreation center, D-I athletics, an award-winning nine-hole golf course and a five-mile recreational trail and arboretum, which is free and open to the public. This four-campus University transforms lives and communities through student-focused teaching and research, innovative learning opportunities, powerful connections and a problem-solving approach to education. UW-Green Bay’s main campus is centrally located, close to both the Door County resort area and the dynamic economies of Northeast Wisconsin, the Fox Valley region and the I-43 corridor. UW-Green Bay offers in-demand programs in science, engineering and technology; business; health, education and social welfare; and arts, humanities and social sciences. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu.

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Philosopher’s Café event to delve into Anti-Realism in Science on Wednesday, Nov. 11

Come join us Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. for some fun conversation on the nature and aims of science with CAHSS and Effect! Ever since Isaac Newton’s counter-intuitive yet powerfully predictive theory of universal gravitation, scientists have had to grapple with the possibility that their theories may not explain the world, but only help us to make predictions about its future. Anti-Realism, one of the dominant views in the Philosophy of Science, maintains that scientific theories are nothing more than fictional constructs whose only aim is to make correct predictions. Asked whether electrons are real, the Anti-Realist will reply that the very question is nonsensical; because there is no way to visually verify the existence of an electron the question of its reality cannot be answered. In this month’s Philosopher’s Café, Chris Martin (University of Toledo) hosts as we will delve into the murky waters of Anti-Realism in science. Join the discussion… Philosopher’s Café: Do Electrons Exist: Anti-Realism in Science. For more information and to join the live event, visit the CAHSS and Effect website.

Common CAHSS

Part 3 of Common CAHSS: Beyond Sustainability Speaker Series to focus on Ecopoetics

Chris McAllister Williams
Chris McAllister Williams

Join Assistant Professor Chris McAllister Williams (English and Humanities) on Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020  from 4 to 5 p.m to learn about ecopoetics. Ecopoetics is more than just poems about nature. Rather, it is poetry that positions humankind in relationship to ‘the natural,’ embodying the tensions between ecological landscapes and late capitalism in, as scholar Lynn Keller terms it, the “self-conscious Anthropocene.” This talk will draw upon the work of bell hooks, Juliana Spahr, Forrest Gander, and others to situate the concerns of the Anthropocene—the proposed name for a new epoch when human activity is the dominant force reshaping the planet—alongside poetic approaches that seek to explore those concerns, culminating in a discussion about the interwoven nature of the ecological location, sustainability, and creativity.

To join the virtual event, visit the CAHSS and Effect website.

6:30 Concert Series: Travel in Place with Eric Hansen

We may be spending a lot more time at home, but UW-Green Bay Music’s Eric Hansen will take us on new adventures in this streamed travel-themed solo clarinet recital. Works on the program include Eric Mandat’s evocative The Jungle and Joan Tower’s virtuosic Wings. The event is Oct. 26, 2020 beginning at 6:30 p.m. on the Weidner Center Youtube page.

Common CAHSS

‘The Civil Rights Movement meets the Environmental Movement: How We Can Advocate for Environmental Justice’

Green Bay, Wis.—University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Associate Prof. Elizabeth Wheat will discuss environmental justice and its relationship to civil rights in a presentation, Thursday, Oct. 22 at 4 p.m. It is free and open to the public and can be accessed at https://cahsseffect.org/events/.

According to the event description, Wheat will be diving into the environmental justice movement in the United States that began in 1982 when residents of Warren County, North Carolina, used non-violent tactics to oppose the siting of a toxic PCB landfill in their mainly African American community. Decades later, Sheila Holt described her family’s health struggles after the government of Dickson, Tennessee, protected white families from polluted drinking water but told her and other Black families that the water was safe. She inspired countless of other people to think of environmental issues as human rights issues that must be addressed through confronting systemic racism.

“As I see protests in 2020 bringing many of the environmental justice crises into a bigger public discussion, I hope we can think beyond traditional environmental and sustainability challenges and really start addressing the core issues of racism that magnify existing environmental problems,” Wheat says.

Wheat is the second in a speaker series brought to both campus and community as part of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences 2020-21 theme, “Beyond Sustainability.” Professor David J. Voelker (Humanities, History), co-chair and program director said this theme is especially timely…

“The Covid-19 pandemic and the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement, which have cast intense light on the challenges that we face as a society, provide especially poignant contexts to address the theme of ‘Beyond Sustainability: Imagining an Ecological Future,’” Voelker says. “We need a more robust framework than “environmental sustainability” to address the interrelated environmental and social crises that we now face. The word ‘environment’ draws a line of separation between humans and the rest of the community of life. We have been talking about sustainability for decades, but we’ve made little progress on addressing unsustainability,” Voelker said. “I hope that the conference theme helps us as a community to imagine something beyond ‘environmental sustainability’—an ecologically sound and just society.”

The College of Arts, Humanities and Social Science will also host a virtual week around the theme, Nov. 30, 2020 through December 4, 2020.

Prof. Wheat to lead environmental justice/civil rights presentation, Thursday, Oct. 22

UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Elizabeth Wheat will discuss environmental justice and its relationship to civil rights in a presentation, Thursday, Oct. 22 at 4 p.m. It is free and open to the public and can be accessed at https://cahsseffect.org/events/.

According to the event description, Wheat will be diving into the environmental justice movement in the United States that began in 1982 when residents of Warren County, North Carolina, used non-violent tactics to oppose the siting of a toxic PCB landfill in their mainly African American community. Decades later, Sheila Holt described her family’s health struggles after the government of Dickson, Tennessee, protected white families from polluted drinking water but told her and other Black families that the water was safe. She inspired countless of other people to think of environmental issues as human rights issues that must be addressed through confronting systemic racism.