Reminder: share thoughts on time capsule items

There is less than a week left for the campus community to share thoughts on what items should be placed in the UWGB time capsule in celebration of the 50th year. The time capsule will be opened in 2065. Chime in to help tell the story of campus to those in the Phoenix future! For inspiration, view this video created by The UWGB History Club. Take the survey (survey ends March 20).

Take the survey

UW-Green Bay Associate Professor Steve Meyer March Presenter in ‘Last Lecture’ Series

GREEN BAY – Associate professor Steve Meyer is the second to last speaker in the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s “Last Lecture Series” line-up. Meyer will present, “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 27.

The Last Lecture Series is part of UWGB’s 50th Anniversary celebration. Each month a UW-Green Bay faculty member is chosen to give a public presentation on a topic of his or her choice under the premise that it’s their last. Lectures take place in the University Union’s Christie Theatre, at 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay and are free open to the public.

“I watched Randy Pausch’s Last Lecture online and was very moved by what he had to say,” Meyer said in regards as to why he chose his topic. “Several years ago when UWGB’s Residence Hall programmers asked me to present a Last Lecture, I thought long and hard about what I would present. It would definitely not be anything related to my academic background – in the end any knowledge I’ve gained about meteorology and climatology isn’t going to change anybody’s life or way of thinking. Like Randy Pausch, I want to leave behind a message that I believe will help people put life into perspective. To cause them to think about what they will do with the years they have left, and to be thankful for all they have experienced throughout their years.”

Meyer has been a professor at UW-Green Bay since 2001. He received his Bachelor’s at Northern Illinois University, and both his Master’s and Ph.D. at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln. He teaches courses in the Natural and Applied Sciences department. He was a FOCUS Co-director for 8 years, has twice served as chair of the University Committee and recently became the Secretary of the Faculty and Staff.

The following is the remaining Last Lecture:

  • April 13 – Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science, “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit.”

What should go in the Phoenix time capsule?

In celebration of UW-Green Bay’s 50th year, plans are in place for a new UWGB Time Capsule (to be opened in 2065). What should go in the new capsule? We want to know. The UWGB History Club created a short video to encourage you to take the survey, or skip right to the survey http://bit.ly/FiftyandForward.

Celebrating UWGB’s 50th, Historical Perspective’s 30th

There are two programs coming up in celebration of UWGB’s 50th and the Historical Perspective Series’ 30th Anniversaries. It’s not too early to mark them on your calendar. At 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 29 in Rose Hall 250, UWGB, actor, comedian, political commentator, and the host of Tell Me Everything on SiriuxXM Insight, John Fugelsang, will speak on Humor and Politics. In addition, at 2 p.m. Thursday, March 24 and Tuesday, March 29 in Rose Hall 250, campus will have an opportunity to view the new documentary Dream On, in which Fuglesang looks into the State of the American Dream by retracing Alexis De Tocqueville’s 1831 journey. Fugelsang will be available to discuss the trip and answer questions following the Tuesday, March 29 showing. This event is co-sponsored with the Chancellor’s Office.

Next up, at 2 p.m. Thursday, April 7 in Rose Hall 250, UWGB, The Nation magazine’s national affairs correspondent and author of DOLLAROCRACY will speak on Money, Media, & Politics. This event is co-sponsored with the UWGB student organization The Critical Left.

Cheers for the next ‘After Thoughts’ featuring Ye Olde Pubs

GREEN BAY – University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Associate Prof. (History) Caroline Boswell will present “Ye Olde Pub: A Social and Cultural History of England’s Early Drinking Houses” on Tuesday, March 1 as part of the University’s After Thoughts series.

The venue will change slightly to accommodate a Wisconsin Public Television recording (and later broadcast) of the event. Instead of its usual location, the Weidner Center Grand Foyer, it will be held in the Weidner Center’s Fort Howard Hall on the UWGB campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

Photo: Caroline Boswell
Prof. Caroline Boswell

Boswell’s presentation will delve into the rich early history of those temples of British culture: the pubs. Beyond their charm and antiquity, these centuries-old drinking establishments were historic centers for social and political activity, according to Boswell. In medieval and early modern England drinking houses — alehouses, inns and taverns — were vital hubs of sociability, culture and news. Although drinking houses formed an integral part of the social lives of many English men and women, some feared these “dens of iniquity” bred seditious toasts and songs, subversive speeches against church and state and lewd behavior. This presentation will walk through the vibrant social lives of England’s historic watering holes c. 1400-1800.

UW-Green Bay’s 50th Anniversary committee is contributing complementary samples of GB Golden — UWGB’s special edition 50th Anniversary beer — for paid attendees at the pre-presentation reception. Produced in small batches by Titletown Brewing Co., Green Bay, GB Golden is a Kölsch style ale — a slightly malt balanced, light bodied, golden beer; closest in style to an American Lager.

Boswell received her undergraduate degree at UW-Madison, and her master’s and Ph.D. at Brown University. She is a co-editor of Syllabus Journal, and has published articles and book reviews regarding the history and culture of England within the Journal of British Studies, and Seventeenth Century.

Now in its fifth full season, After Thoughts seeks to connect members of the community with UW-Green Bay. The gatherings showcase talented women among University faculty, staff and alumni, and convene men and women after their workday for learning, enrichment and fun.

After Thoughts begins with a 5 p.m. reception with hors d’oeuvres, followed by Boswell’s presentation beginning at 5:45 to 7 p.m.

Seating for After Thoughts is limited. Advanced registration is recommended. The cost of each program is $15. To reserve your spot, send a check (payable to UW-Green Bay Foundation) to: UW-Green Bay Foundation, CL 805, 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay, WI 54311; or register online. Walk-up registration also is an option. Call (920) 465-2074 for more information. You can find After Thoughts on Facebook. Visit After Thoughts website for more information about the series.

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Lucy Arendt to be the next ‘Last Lecture’ series speaker

GREEN BAY – Associate Dean Lucy Arendt is the fourth speaker in the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s “Last Lecture Series” line-up, and the first this semester. Arendt will present, “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, February 17.

The Last Lecture Series is part of the celebration of UWGB’s 50th Anniversary. Each month of the fall and spring semesters, a UW-Green Bay faculty member is chosen to give a public presentation on a topic of his or her choice. They are to convey what lecture they would give if it were to be their last. The monthly lectures take place in the University Union’s Christie Theatre, at 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay. The lectures are free and open to the public.

“I think it has become an untested assumption that individual people should give up their rights in order to be employed, and I view this as a serious threat to our nation and to the health and well-being of all individuals,” Arendt said regarding her reason for choosing this topic. “I think that organizations have steadily eroded our collective sense of individualism and responsibility through their relentless focus on bureaucratization. I believe that universities have a special obligation to reverse this disturbing trend. What we need is a shared understanding of this threat and a call to action by faculty, staff, and students — all of whom should and must have a strong sense of ownership and voice in what universities and their communities do.”

Photo: Prof. Lucy Arendt
Lucy Arendt

Arendt has been a professor at UW-Green Bay for 10 years. She received both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees at UW-Green Bay, and a Ph.D. from UW-Milwaukee. She teaches courses in the Business Administration and the Sustainable Management programs. The published author has articles in the Journal of Academy of Business and Economics, Earthquake SPECTRA, and Journal of Leadership and Organization Studies, among others. She has also co-authored books about natural disasters and recovery.

The following are the remaining “Last Lectures:”

  • March 23 – Steve Meyer, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences, “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s”
  • April 13 – Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science, “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit.”

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Jazz ensembles celebrate UW-Green Bay’s 50th with ‘That ‘60s Show’

jazz-poster-webGREEN BAY — The University of Wisconsin Green Bay Music program pays tribute to the school’s 50th anniversary with instrumental and vocal jazz ensembles combining in concert to present “That ‘60s Show,” at 7:30 p.m. Saturday (Nov. 14) in the University Theatre, located in Theatre Hall on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Drive.

Performing will be three student ensembles:  Jazz Ensemble I, Jazz Ensemble II, and the Vocal Jazz Ensembles, all under the direction of Associate Profs. of Music John Salerno and Adam Gaines.

Admission is $10 for the general public, $5 for seniors and free for students of all ages. Tickets may be purchased at the door on the night of the performance.

Gaines’s Jazz Ensemble II will open the concert with a heavy dose of the Beatles — jazz arrangements of the classic Lennon and McCartney tunes “Michelle,” “And I Love Her” and “Norwegian Wood” — along with a swingin’ version of the Bobby Troup hit “Route 66” and a performance of the classic American blues tune “House of the Rising Sun,” made famous in the 1964 hit by the British rock group The Animals.

Following intermission, the 10-member Vocal Jazz Ensemble under the direction of Salerno, will perform vintage 1960s jazz-tinged selections, as announced from the stage. The vocal jazz set will be followed by Salerno’s top instrumental group, Jazz Ensemble I, who will close the concert with selections to be announced from stage.

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iPat Film series shows 1965 movie ‘Crack in the World’

The iPat environmental film series screens its first movie of the year with a nod to UW-Green Bay’s 50th anniversary. At 7 p.m. this coming Monday (Nov. 16) in the Christie Theatre, they’ll show the 1965 release “Crack in the World,” with an introduction and discussion led by Assistant Prof. Ryan Currier of the NAS department. The entertaining film portrays the fanciful tale of two geologists, married to one another, who promise the world plentiful, cheap, geothermal energy if only they can detonate a nuclear warhead inside the Earth. Up will come the magma, they say. But magma isn’t all they get. The iPat Film Series (impact = population * affluence * technology) is sponsored by PEAC, The Center for Public Affairs, and the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs.

UW-Green Bay presents Susan Gallagher-Lepak for the “Last Lecture Series”

Prof. Susan Gallagher-Lepak is the third speaker in the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s “Last Lecture Series” line-up. Gallagher-Lepak will present, “E-learning: The Train has Left the Station,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, November 18.

The Last Lecture Series is part of the celebration of UWGB’s 50th Anniversary. Each month of the fall and spring semesters, a UW-Green Bay faculty is chosen to give a public presentation on a topic of his or her choice. They are to convey what lecture they would give if it was to be their last. The monthly lectures take place in the University Union’s Christie Theatre, at 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay. The lectures are free and open to the public.

“Higher education has changed dramatically since UW-Green Bay began in 1965,” Gallagher-Lepak says, as to why she chose this topic. “A major transformation has been the introduction and growth of e-learning. E-Learning is ubiquitous and a desired format for many learners. It allows for anytime/anywhere learning. As a faculty member heavily involved in teaching online courses, I have a perspective to share about why I ‘jumped on the train.’ “

Her lecture will focus on several pivotal e-learning influences that have shaped her thinking and application of e-learning. The lecture will specifically address the questions:

  1. What is e-learning? How much e-learning is going on?
  2. What influences and experiences led me (and excited me) to teach online courses?
  3. What’s ahead for e-learning in higher education (includes some areas we need to be concerned about)

Gallagher-Lepak is both a licensed psychologist and a registered nurse for the State of Wisconsin. She has been an instructor at UW-Green Bay since 2003, and was promoted to full professor in 2015. She serves as both Chair and Director of the UWGB’s Nursing program. She earned a B.S. in Nursing from Marquette University, a Master of Science in Nursing from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and a Ph.D. for Rehabilitation Counseling Psychology with a minor in Educational Psychology from University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The following are the remaining Last Lectures:

  • Feb. 17- Lucy Arendt, Associate Dean, College of Professional Studies, “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values”
  • March 23- Steve Meyer, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences, “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s”
  • April 13- Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science, “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit.”

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