Wisconsin Big Idea Tournament: Student business competition, presented by WiSys, goes virtual June 10

UW System student entrepreneurs will compete for funding and recognition.

Eight teams of student entrepreneurs (three from UW-Green Bay) will compete for cash prizes and recognition in the Wisconsin Big Idea Tournament, presented by WiSys.

The tournament brings together teams of university students from across the state to pitch innovative business ideas. The competition was established to extend the Wisconsin entrepreneurial ecosystem to University of Wisconsin students with the goal to improve the overall quality of business startup performance in the state.

This year’s tournament, which will be conducted virtually because of the coronavirus crisis, will be broadcast on WiSys’ Facebook page and YouTube channel on June 10 at 6 p.m.

The first place team will win a $2,500 cash prize courtesy of Idea Fund of La Crosse. The second place team will receive a $1,500 cash prize, courtesy of gener8tor, and the third place team will receive a $500, courtesy of Charter Bank. The participating teams, which won local feeder competitions or received an at-large bid, include:

  • Didómi LLC: UW-River Falls students Lamah Bility and Anaa Jibicho want to sell fashionable, reusable water bottles and donate a portion of the profits to combating the water crisis in developing countries.
  • G-Pods: The business idea of UW-Green Bay’s Logan Holbrook and Katelyn Desrochers is for a hearing-aid with sensors to monitor the user’s health data and call for help in the case of an emergency.
  • Lëvor: The organic hair care company, presented by UW-Milwaukee’s Loren Nelson and Johnathan Brown, aims to desegregate the haircare industry by providing hair care for all hair types.
  • Local2You LLC: UW-Green Bay’s Noah Redfearn, Emily Walczak and Madeline Yoss want to create an online service to connect local entrepreneurs and inventors to virtual markets.
  • Prexo: Ian McDonald and Abbie Merrill of UW Oshkosh are developing a political app to allow users to easily track presidential executive orders.
  • Spark Convos, LLC: UW-Eau Claire’s Mary Cait McManamon’s online business is committed to sparking in-person connections by selling apparel that inspires conversations.
  • 20 Credit Studios: UW-Stout’s Justin Bryant and Katelyn Zenz want to make fun games for a wide audience by developing a close feedback relationship with consumers.
  • 3C: Sydney Gille, Brett Nimz and Joe Doro of UW-Green Bay are creating an online platform to connect volunteers with charities that need help completing social good projects.

For more information about the Wisconsin Big Idea Tournament, visit wisys.org/bigidea.

This year’s Wisconsin Big Idea Tournament is sponsored by Charter Bank, gener8tor, Idea Fund of La Crosse, Market & Johnson, UW System, Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation and Xcel Energy.

WiSys is a nonprofit organization that works with faculty, staff, students, and alumni of the UW System to facilitate cutting-edge research programs, develop and commercialize discoveries and foster a spirit of innovative and entrepreneurial thinking across the state.

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Craig Sauer

WiSys | Marketing & Communications Associate

608-316-4039

@WiSysCraig

UW-Green Bay and Phoenix Men’s Basketball Head Coach Linc Darner Decide to Part Ways

Statement to media:

UW-Green Bay and Phoenix Men’s Basketball Head Coach Linc Darner Decide to Part Ways

Green Bay, Wis.—University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Chancellor Michael Alexander confirmed today, Monday, May 18, 2020, that the University and men’s basketball coach Linc Darner have decided to part ways.

Darner completes his head coaching career for the Phoenix with a 92-80 overall record in five seasons. He most notably led the Phoenix back to the NCAA Tournament in his first season, 2015-16, snapping a 20-year program drought after his team captured the Horizon League Tournament Championship. Darner led GB to a 51-39 record in league play during that time, finishing in the top four of the standing in four of his five seasons.

“I would like to thank former Chancellor Gary Miller and former Athletic Director Mary Ellen Gillespie for giving me the opportunity to coach at Green Bay,” said Darner. “I would like to thank my staff, recruits and all current and former players who helped us make the NCAA Tournament, taking GB the furthest ever in the postseason to the CIT Finals and having the most up-tempo offense in the country.  Most importantly, I’m proud to have graduated my players at an extremely high rate including two perfect APR scores which was never done before at GB. I cannot wait to advance my career as a head basketball coach and am looking forward to new opportunities.”

Chancellor Alexander said he wishes nothing but the best for Coach Darner.

“We appreciate the leadership of Coach Darner and his focus on coaching and mentoring the outstanding student-athletes that have been part of this program during his tenure as head coach. We are a Division I University and remain committed to continuing the legacy of our outstanding Division I athletics program in the future.”

Darner coached eight individuals who garnered Horizon All-League honors (Carrington Love and Jordan Fouse in 2016; Charles Cooper and Kenneth Lowe in 2017; Khalil Small in 2018; Sandy Cohen III in 2019 and JayQuan McCloud and Amari Davis in 2020, with Davis becoming the first freshman in program history to be named Horizon League Freshman of the Year.) Four of those players earned First Team All-League honors.

“We sincerely thank Coach Darner for his service and strong commitment to our student-athletes here at UW-Green Bay and to the Green Bay community over the past five years,” said GB Athletics Director Charles Guthrie. “We wish him all the best in his future endeavors.”

Guthrie says a national search for a new head coach will begin immediately.

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UW-Green Bay Announces Leadership Changes

CEO of Manitowoc Campus Rachele Bakic named new Executive Director of Admissions; Jamie Schramm to be CEO at both Sheboygan and Manitowoc Campuses

Green Bay, Wis.—Look no further, the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay has found its executive director of Admissions 40 miles to the south of the Green Bay Campus. Rachele Bakic, who has served as campus executive officer (CEO) at UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus the past two years, will begin as UW-Green Bay’s executive director of Admissions beginning May 11, 2020.

Jamie Schramm

Jamie Schramm, currently CEO of the Sheboygan Campus will be CEO for both Manitowoc and Sheboygan Campuses moving forward.

“We are very fortunate to have great leadership at our Manitowoc and Sheboygan campuses,” said Chancellor Michael Alexander. “In order to fully utilize their skills, we have expanded the roles of Rachele Bakic and Jamie Schramm. While Rachele is leading our full University recruitment efforts, Jamie will be able to create a cohesive vision for how the Sheboygan and Manitowoc campuses can serve their communities. Jamie’s incredible energy and history working in the region will bring both campuses to new heights.”

Assistant Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Management Jennifer Jones said University leaders had an opportunity to think innovatively about how to best fill the Admissions position.

“Fortunately, the best candidate for the job already works at UW-Green Bay, which will give us a distinct advantage to move quickly towards enrollment growth because Rachele already has strong working relationships and is passionate about seeing all the UW-Green Bay campuses grow to their fullest potential.”

Rachele Bakic

Bakic, named to “Manitowoc’s Future 15” by the Young Professionals of Manitowoc County in 2019, will be responsible for the vision and overall leadership of the Admissions Office including recruitment, marketing, application processing and admission decisions, international admission, supervision, budget oversight and development, admissions policy development and implementation, and both long-term and short-term planning for the purposes of meeting University enrollment goals.

“Since joining UW-Green Bay two years ago, I have been energized by the passion and dedication of faculty and staff colleagues, and by the student body across the entire University,” Bakic said. “I’m proud of the strong momentum the Manitowoc Campus has built during my time as CEO, our many achievements are a direct result of the team’s hard work day-in and day-out. Although I am sad to leave behind a campus and a community that became home, the opportunity to lead the Admissions Office enables me to focus on partnerships and drive enrollment growth at all four of our campuses. As we navigate these unprecedented times, I look forward to collaborating with internal and external partners to diversify and grow our student body while fostering UW-Green Bay’s commitment to access and student success.”

Schramm was named CEO of the Sheboygan Campus in December of 2019. He is an active member of the Sheboygan community, serving as a Junior Achievement classroom volunteer, Acuity Business Challenge coach, INCubatorEDU Entrepreneurship Program community champion, and advisory board member and volunteer in many areas of business development and higher education.

“I am grateful and honored for the continued opportunities UW-Green Bay has afforded me since starting as the campus executive officer (CEO) of our Sheboygan Campus,” he said.  “In the four months since joining the University, I have been surrounded by a collaborative, innovative and future-focused group of professionals.  As we have navigated the COVID-19 crises, the level of teamwork and diversity of thought has positioned us to successfully serve our students. I would like to congratulate Rachele Bakic as she moves into her role at our main Green Bay campus and look forward to strengthening relationships across both the Sheboygan and Manitowoc region in order to connect both campuses to their respective communities. I am a firm believer that what happens at our campuses is only a beginning—and that success for a modern university is measured by its collaboration with, and contribution to, the communities in which they reside.”

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UW-Green Bay philanthropy class announces $21,000 in grants

Foundations Health and Wholeness/Boys and Girls Clubs, Golden House, CASA and Howe Community Resource Center to Benefit

Green Bay, Wis.—A University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s Philanthropy class announced today (May 5, 2020) the recipients of $21,000 in grants to assist area non-profit organizations, which work with at-risk youth in areas that address mental health.

The class chose to address the issue after conducting community research in the Green Bay area. The UW-Green Bay students recognized that there will be an increased need to work with at-risk youth who are going through this traumatic time. Due to Gov. Evers’ stay-at-home orders, the students conducted virtual interviews with nonprofit finalists to learn about their proposed uses of the funding and held deliberations online.

“How often does a student get to give away a grant? We’re usually the ones being interviewed, not doing the interviews,” said student Leslie Lee.  “I learned that organizations are working hard at adapting to the safer-at-home order and contributing in their own way to the needs of the people they serve. No matter who is chosen, I think we can all agree that each organization is doing great things to help our community.”

The grants were as follows:

—An anonymous donor provided $10,000 of which UW-Green Bay students awarded to a collaboration between the Boys and Girls Clubs of Green Bay and Foundations Health and Wholeness for use in maintaining an innovative program of counseling, Youth Mental Health Matters, and the Zen Dens at the two area clubhouses. Foundations and Boys and Girls Club work cooperatively to reach out to at-risk youth who attend the Boys and Girls Clubs throughout the year. Counseling is provided on site at the club locations by counselors trained and overseen by Foundations.

—$10,000 provided by the Learning by Giving Foundation was divided in half, with $5,000 awarded to Golden House for technology and programming needed to reach youth impacted by domestic abuse. The remaining $5,000 was granted to CASA of Brown County (Court Appointed Special Advocates) for activities and resources for the Fostering Futures program.

Maddy Didier, a Public Administration student, won the national Learning By Giving Foundation Blog Contest and chose to award the $1,000 grant to the Howe Community Resource Center. “I learned so much about the achievement gap when I interviewed staff at Howe earlier in the semester, ” Didier said. “Then later, I was impressed with the way the Howe team worked together adapting to the needs of their community when the pandemic unfolded.”

The UW-Green Bay class, “Philanthropy: Civic Engagement Through Giving,” is a hands-on approach to help college students develop commitment to, and engagement in, the community. Classmates agree on a cause, and then go through a process of vetting nonprofit organizations that address that cause and selecting a recipient. “The students learn how to act on their values to make a positive impact,” said Associate Professor Lora Warner who teaches the course, the only Learning by Giving course in Wisconsin. It is being offered for the eighth time.

Early in the semester, students investigated four community issues of concern: Prison Reentry, Mental Health, The Achievement Gap, and Bullying. In discussions about how to focus their giving, it became clear that these topics were related to one core issue: the experience of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES). Youth who have experienced more ACES have higher rates of anxiety and depression. UW-Green Bay students felt if they could work “upstream,” by funding a program that helps children have healthy development, they might address the root cause of these other problems. Shanna O’Berry, Director of Academic Programs for the Learning by Giving Foundation (who was able to join the class several times virtually), observed that “early on, the students embraced their goal to help youth mental health. After the pandemic unfolded, they became extremely committed to having an impact through effective philanthropy.”

The community-based, high impact class was altered by the Stay-at-Home orders which required all classes to finish the semester online. March 12, 2020 was the last day the class worked together on campus; after that, all work was conducted virtually.

“Even though they were facing hardships, my students were extremely committed to giving out this funding responsibly. I don’t think any of us, nonprofits included, will ever forget this experience,” said Warner.

The UWGBphilanthropy Facebook page references both a blog about the students’ experiences this semester and hosts an award presentation video. (Photo of the class is available to media upon request).

Press Release by UW-Green Bay student Don Schunke

About the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is a comprehensive public institution offering undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs to more than 8,000 students with campus locations in Green Bay, Marinette, Manitowoc and Sheboygan. Established in 1965 on the border of Green Bay, the University and its campuses are centers of cultural enrichment, innovation and learning. The Green Bay campus is home to one of the Midwest’s most prolific performing arts centers, a nationally recognized 4,000-seat student recreation center, D-I athletics, an award-winning nine-hole golf course and a five-mile recreational trail and arboretum, which is free and open to the public. This four-campus University transforms lives and communities through student-focused teaching and research, innovative learning opportunities, powerful connections and a problem-solving approach to education. UW-Green Bay’s main campus is centrally located, close to both the Door County resort area and the dynamic economies of Northeast Wisconsin, the Fox Valley region and the I-43 corridor. UW-Green Bay offers in-demand programs in science, engineering and technology; business; health, education and social welfare; and arts, humanities and social sciences. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu.

 

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Impact MBA, woman facing away, looking at a backdrop of data visualization charts

Calling all business revolutionaries! UW-Green Bay’s new and innovative executive IMPACT MBA Program is seeking its first cohort of students

Applications now being accepted; prior business degree is not a prerequisite

Green Bay, WI—While the slogan “Don’t Fear the Revolution—Lead It!” might conjure up images of an army in the streets, fear not. In this case, the “revolution” is technological, and the “leaders” are local business leaders invested in ensuring that our region is not left behind.

It’s in the spirit of a business revolution that the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s executive IMPACT MBA Program was launched. And it’s now accepting applicants—including those who have demonstrated great professional success, but lack the formal undergraduate business degrees or coursework required for entry into most MBA programs.

“We’re looking for people with a visionary outlook,” says Mathew Dornbush, dean of UW-Green Bay’s Cofrin School of Business. “Business leaders who can see that the world is changing at a pace and in ways that make it difficult for many businesses to adapt. This program is looking for those leaders confident in their ability to be the agents of positive transformation for their organizations, and the Impact MBA is designed to prepare them for that role.”

That “change,” often referred to as The Fourth Industrial Revolution, describes the fusion of accelerating technology, disruptive business landscapes, and growing social and environmental opportunities that are impacting businesses at every level. The IMPACT MBA program prepares business leaders to think differently to keep pace with those emerging business challenges.

Why IMPACT? After completing the program, the biggest impact, says Dornbush, will be on those participants who see themselves as change-agents. “We focus on your personal leadership transformation and the impact you can make on your organization as it faces an exponentially changing business environment.”

While the content is revolutionary, the program itself is designed to accommodate busy people with lives to live. In less than two years, a cohort class of around 25 students will learn together through a hybrid curriculum in both face-to-face and online sessions. All material is presented by UW-Green Bay’s internationally recognized, award-winning faculty with an impressive history of success in academic and business environments. And as far as the cost impact, at $48,000, the IMPACT MBA offers the lowest cost in the region for a hybrid on-campus/online executive MBA.

True to UW-Green Bay’s community-centric identity, the IMPACT MBA is open to all educational backgrounds. An innovative “business bootcamp” will be available, if needed.

See the video from program leaders.

Is the IMPACT MBA right for you and your business? Don’t delay as space is limited for each cohort of students. Interested students can learn more and apply for admission to the program immediately.

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Lolar Moua announced as UW-Green Bay Student Employee of the Year

Green Bay, WI—After announcing finalists last week, the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay announced the winner of the Student Employee of the Year on April 27, 2020. Lolar Moua (center of photo), from Green Bay, who works with Web Development staff in the Information Technology (IT) division, received the honor. Students were evaluated on eight National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) core competencies:

  • Critical Thinking/Problem Solving
  • Oral/Written Communications
  • Teamwork/Collaboration
  • Digital Technology
  • Leadership
  • Professionalism/Work Ethic
  • Career Management
  • Global/Intercultural Fluency

Moua is the student lead web developer, creating and updating websites for personnel and divisions across campus. His work includes spearheading web projects from scoping and planning, to execution. He assures the sites meet accessibility standards, serves as the primary back-up for the other developers, and mentors new student employees.

His supervisors had this to say, “By nature, web development is an ever-changing environment in which technologies and best practices can change very quickly. This never hindered Lolar. In fact, he seemed to thrive with it (he is a Computer Science major, after all). Despite having little-to-no prior knowledge with web development, Lolar was able to work with and learn new technologies and programming languages at an incredibly fast rate. He easily became nuanced in using the Kentico and WordPress platforms, and a list of some of the languages Lolar utilized on the job includes HTML, CSS, JavaScript, ASP.NET, C#, SQL, VBScript, and PHP…. Arguably one of his greatest gifts is his ability to transfer his knowledge and the ability to teach them. He has done a great job becoming a mentor to other student employees, as he provides the majority of training during the onboarding process for new students.”

There were 872 student employees at UW-Green Bay (prior to the pandemic). Here’s a full list of the SEOTY nominees along with their departments and job titles:

  • Jenna Bares, University Recreation (Graphic Design/Marketing Supervisor and Events Staff Supervisor)
  • Kiana Bennett, Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment (Office Assistant)
  • Callyn Diamond, Admissions Office (Call Team Lead)
  • Evy (Evelyn) Ehrlich, University Union (Phoenix Club Coordinator)
  • Yaching Kuo, Graduate Studies (Office Assistant)
  • Kyle Loose, University Recreation (Lead Event Staff Supervisor)
  • Lolar Moua, Web Development – Division of IT (Student Lead Web Developer)
  • Rebecca Schwerman, Weidner Center (Production and Event Intern/Assistant)
  • Katie (Kathleen) Stephenson, Marketing and University Communication (Graphic Design intern)
  • Elizabeth Traska, Weidner Center (Valet)
  • Emily Walczak, Office of Student Life (Good Times Programming General Manager and Student Ambassador)

Features and photos of all the nominees are posted on the UWGB Student Employment Facebook page.

In the photo: Moua center, with supervisors Drew Ryan (left) and Brandon Langer (right).

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UW-Green Bay announces furloughs beginning May 2, 2020

University makes move to ‘protect the future of the institution’

Green Bay, Wis.—Campus leaders of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay announced today (April 24, 2020) that it will place 227 staff members on furlough, May 2, 2020 through May 31, 2020. All administrators with an annual salary above $100,000 are also taking a voluntary furlough.

“It is terribly unfortunate that the COVID19 pandemic has forced our hand,” said Interim Chancellor Sheryl Van Gruensven in a memorandum to UW-Green Bay faculty and staff announcing the decision. “Today, we must announce plans to enact furloughs at UW-Green Bay to protect the future of the institution. This disruption in our lives and our livelihood is one that is greatly disappointing, considering the amazing momentum we had heading into the 2020-21 academic year. Although our financial health is not in jeopardy at this particular time, the reality is, we lost $3 million in revenue in just the past month and we must navigate risk until we can find some level of normalcy. We must also position ourselves to maintain healthy cash balances in the event we experience additional losses in revenue and other funding sources.”

Furloughed staff members received notice from their supervisors beginning Thursday (April 23) morning. Furloughs allow members of the campus community to retain their benefits, yet still be eligible for unemployment compensation.

Following Governor Evers’ Safer at Home extension, UW-Green Bay announced that it would close campus through May 31, 2020. For the summer, the University announced the delivery of more than 200 classes online, and cancelled on-campus summer camps, providing a number of new online and remotely delivered camp experiences, instead. This decision drastically cut the workload for a number of employees.

In addition to furloughs of some of its staff members, Green Bay Athletics announced today that it will be suspending its men’s and women’s tennis teams indefinitely at the conclusion of the 2019-20 academic year. Several long-standing challenges have continued to hinder the opportunity for growth of the program and have contributed to rising costs that are outpacing revenue, the most significant of which is the lack of an on-campus tennis facility and off-campus rental costs. Based on past expenditures the suspension of these two programs will result in a savings of approximately $170,000 operationally per year and $160,000 in athletic tuition scholarships awarded per year. This decision does not impact Division I status nor membership in the Horizon League.

Because of travel restrictions, the uncertainty of International Education opportunities, and the immediate drastic decrease in international activity, the University also laid off four positions in the Office of International Education.

“We need to protect our institution by ensuring we have enough financial reserves to be able to react calmly and strategically to any adverse financial situation we face in the future. Failure to act now, could put our staff and our ability to deliver a quality education to our students in much greater danger in the Fall,” said Chancellor Elect Michael Alexander. “This University has a history of overcoming challenges through creativity and toughness. It will be difficult, but we will get through these unprecedented and disruptive times, together.”

UW-Green Bay expects to see about $250,000 in cost recovery with the furlough, in addition to the savings from International Education and Athletics. Faculty and other nine-month employees were exempt from furloughs for this fiscal year. Campus leaders will present a “state of the University” at a virtual meeting with members of the campus community on May 1, 2020.

Alexander and Van Gruensven messaged the campus community on Friday via video and memorandum.

About the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is a comprehensive public institution offering undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs to more than 8,700 students with campus locations in Green Bay, Marinette, Manitowoc and Sheboygan. Established in 1965 on the border of Green Bay, the University and its campuses are centers of cultural enrichment, innovation and learning. The Green Bay campus is home to one of the Midwest’s most prolific performing arts centers, a nationally recognized 4,000-seat student recreation center, D-I athletics, an award-winning nine-hole golf course and a five-mile recreational trail and arboretum, which is free and open to the public. This four-campus University transforms lives and communities through student-focused teaching and research, innovative learning opportunities, powerful connections and a problem-solving approach to education. UW-Green Bay’s main campus is centrally located, close to both the Door County resort area and the dynamic economies of Northeast Wisconsin, the Fox Valley region and the I-43 corridor. UW-Green Bay offers in-demand programs in science, engineering and technology; business; health, education and social welfare; and arts, humanities and social sciences. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu.

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Green Bay Conservation Partners to host sixth annual Spring Roundtable virtually, Thursday, April 23

The Green Bay Conservation Partners will host its sixth annual Spring Roundtable to explore environmental and conservation work in the bay of Green Bay, Lower Fox River watershed, Green Bay’s West Shore and the Door Peninsula.

WHEN: Thursday, April 23, 2020, 9 a.m. – Noon p.m. with optional coffee hour beginning at 8:15 a.m.

WHERE: Virtual Event

WHO: Media are invited to attend. Registration required, please use this link: http://www.gbconservationpartners.org/events/

WHY: With dozens of conservation leaders and experts on hand, the Spring Roundtable is a great opportunity for journalists to identify and develop ideas and sources for news stories.

WHAT: The morning will kick-off with a conservation legislative update followed by a series of 5-minute lightning talks from partners involved in restoration, monitoring and other conservation projects around the region. An interactive roundtable café session will follow with discussions on relevant conservation tools and topics.

MEDIA CONTACT: Matt Kriese, Brown County Parks Director and GBCP steering committee member, 920-448-4464 (desk) or 920-613-6197 (cell)

Highlights include:

Highlights include:

  • Sources of PFAS in Green Bay and Lake Michigan: Elevated PFAS concentrations have been found in wastewater and private drinking water wells in Marinette, Wisconsin. The goal of this project is to better understand the movement of PFAS and its presence in Green Bay.
  • Designation of the Green Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve: UW-Green Bay, among other partners, will lead the Green Bay region nd Wisconsin through the successful designation of the National Estuarine Research Reserve.
  • The Power of Community Interviews in Watershed Management Planning: Concerns related to water quality and conservation were explored through community surveys within the Wequiock Creek watershed, located on the east side of Green Bay. The results helped create a list of priorities that helped shape community meetings and the development of a watershed plan

The Green Bay Conservation Partners was created in 2014 as a self-sustaining regional conservation partnership to facilitate coordinated conservation in northeast Wisconsin.  The partnership consists of individuals working on natural resource issues for government agencies, tribal nations, universities, non-profit groups and others.

The mission of the partnership is to strengthen collaborative efforts among diverse conservation stakeholders to support efficient and effective preservation and enhancement of the land, water and other natural resources of Green Bay and the Lower Fox River watershed. These natural assets are vital to our economy, recreational activities and quality of life.

The partnership focuses on the bay of Green Bay, the Lower Fox River watershed, Green Bay’s West Shore and the Door Peninsula.

Check us out the website.

WiSys looks to support ideas to improve community response to COVID-19, Deadline is April 24

MADISON—WiSys is challenging the UW System community to develop innovative ideas to boost local community preparedness and response to pandemics via “WiSys Innovation Challenge: COVID-19.” WiSys’ challenge comes in response to the national crisis that forced students to leave Wisconsin campuses and WiSys to cancel numerous innovation skill-building events.

The challenge is open to all faculty, staff, students and alumni of the schools that WiSys serves (UW-Eau Claire, UW-Green Bay, UW-La Crosse, UW Oshkosh, UW-Parkside, UW-Platteville, UW-River Falls, UW-Stevens Point, UW-Stout, UW-Superior and UW-Whitewater).

“We want to find functional, local solutions to address the impacts of the epidemic and social distancing in local communities. Solutions can range anywhere from apps and websites to physical devices. This is a chance to help your friends, families and neighbors,” said WiSys President Arjun Sanga.

Innovators have until April 24 to submit their ideas in 250 words or less at wisys.org/challenge.

WiSys will promptly select 20 innovators who will have two weeks to create a proof-of-concept. They will then receive $100 to implement their idea. WiSys may also provide additional resources to further develop an idea after review of the initial implementation.

WiSys suggested some questions participants may consider before submitting an idea:

  • How can we support local hospitals and at-home caregivers in the next couple of months and be more prepared for the next crisis?
  • How can we help local businesses survive this and future economic disruptions?
  • Are there supply-chain solutions for high-demand goods that could meet consumer needs in a timely fashion without resorting to stockpiling?
  • Are there better ways to communicate global health information to underserved and elderly populations?
  • What solutions can help us with our physical and mental wellbeing as social and physical distance grows?

“The coronavirus pandemic is affecting everyday life in new and profound ways, forcing us to rethink how we shop, eat, communicate, learn and travel,” said Sanga. “Moments of crisis, however, present opportunities for innovation. By addressing the underlying problems that the crisis has exposed, we hope this challenge will create a lasting positive change for our communities.”

WiSys is a nonprofit organization that works with faculty, staff, students, and alumni of the UW System to facilitate cutting-edge research programs, develop and commercialize discoveries and foster a spirit of innovative and entrepreneurial thinking across the state.

 

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VIDEO PREVIEW: https://youtu.be/oVsVU4i8V28

 

UW-Green Bay to offer 200+ summer courses and camps online

Opportunities abound to keep students on track, challenged and hopeful

Green Bay, Wis.—The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay announced today (April 14, 2020) that all of its 200+ summer courses and a variety of new virtual camps will be delivered online for the first time ever due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In response to the interruption many pre-college and college students experienced this spring, UW-Green Bay is also opening up more summer sections and classes to accommodate students who want to stay on track academically over the summer.

“The health and safety of students, faculty and staff remain at the forefront of the decisions we are making,” said Interim Chancellor Sheryl Van Gruensven. “We are balancing that priority with creatively providing access to learning, personal and professional growth and enrichment in order to continue to develop the problem solvers and creative thinkers our communities and world need.”

According to University leaders, ongoing education during the summer will be more important than ever this year to keep college students and youth mentally challenged and focused on their futures.

“This is a difficult time for those currently in the workforce and those preparing to enter it in the years ahead,” said UW-Green Bay Chancellor-elect Michael Alexander. “We believe the ability to keep learning is an invaluable way to stay positive about the future, whether that’s through summer classes or a camp experience.”

The final day to register for Summer 2020 classes is Sunday, July 5 for degree-seeking students, and Tuesday, July 14 for non-degree seeking students. Summer courses are offered in four-, six- and 10-week sessions across most of the University’s undergraduate program areas and run from May 18 through July 26. More information on courses is offered via the schedule of classes. More on financial aid for degree-seeking students can be found on the Financial Aid Summer Enrollment page.

The University has also retooled its youth summer camps, transitioning from an on-campus program to an online-based program. Thirteen distinct camps in the areas of nursing, art, engineering, urban horticulture, PRIDE leadership, journaling, innovation scrimmaging, coding and voice lessons will be offered from June 15-August 17. Additional information can be found at  www.uwgb.edu/camps.

“These camps are new and unique and speak to the resiliency of our campers who want to keep learning and challenging themselves over the summer months,” shared Joy Ruzek, assistant vice-chancellor, Division of Continuing Education and Community Engagement. “Problem solving and innovation are engrained in the summer camp experience. That motivated us to quickly innovate to offer camping experiences that are unexpected, fun and inspire students to be innovative themselves.”

To learn more about UW-Green Bay’s new online summer camp offerings and to register, visit www.uwgb.edu/camps. Fall and winter camps are also being planned to provide opportunities to explore, learn and engage. More information is available at 920-465-2267 or camps@uwgb.edu. Campers already registered for face-to-face summer camps are currently being notified and will receive a full refund.

About the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is a comprehensive public institution offering undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs to more than 8,700 students with campus locations in Green Bay, Marinette, Manitowoc and Sheboygan. Established in 1965 on the border of Green Bay, the University and its campuses are centers of cultural enrichment, innovation and learning. The Green Bay campus is home to one of the Midwest’s most prolific performing arts centers, a nationally recognized 4,000-seat student recreation center, D-I athletics, an award-winning nine-hole golf course and a five-mile recreational trail and arboretum, which is free and open to the public. This four-campus University transforms lives and communities through student-focused teaching and research, innovative learning opportunities, powerful connections and a problem-solving approach to education. UW-Green Bay’s main campus is centrally located, close to both the Door County resort area and the dynamic economies of Northeast Wisconsin, the Fox Valley region and the I-43 corridor. UW-Green Bay offers in-demand programs in science, engineering and technology; business; health, education and social welfare; and arts, humanities and social sciences. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu.

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