Erin Weimann

An Engineer Breaking the Mold

Sometimes you have to first take a well-worn path before embarking on the road less traveled.

For Erin Weimann, that path was a career in education. “My original interest was in teaching math.” So she began with a semester in Cardinal Stritch (in Milwaukee) and another semester in Lakeland. And came to a realization. “Then I realized I really didn’t want to teach math. So I decided to take some time and see what I really want to do.”

Erin Weimann
Erin Weimann

That “time” stretched to eight years. But she was neither wandering or lost. Weimann was hired at an international manufacturer of automotive components, with a factory in Sheboygan. What started out as “just a job” evolved into “maybe a career” in mechanical engineering. “I got promoted really quick to an assistant supervisor and moved up the ladder to an engineering specialist role.”

And it was a role that not a lot of women aspired. Even as she progressed in the company, Weimann had to constantly prove her worth to her peers. “The guy who was training me, I passed him up pretty quick. He ended up being told he could learn a lot from me.”

Weimann started working more with maintenance and engineering. And discovered she not only had a talent but a passion for engineering. But this was a career that demanded credentials to progress—specifically a bachelor’s degree. “There was one engineer I was working with and he had earned his degree as an adult. So I decided this is what I want to do.”

At that time, in 2018,  the mechanical engineering program at the UW-Green Bay, Sheboygan Campus, was a collaborative degree with Platteville. She had meetings with an advisor and developed a plan of action based on what classes were offered when and where. Not easy, but doable.

But it was the merger of UW-Green Bay and the Sheboygan Campus that really made the program more viable.

“I could just stay in Sheboygan and that was extremely exciting for me. The fact that it’s all local and I don’t have to drive down to Platteville is awesome.”

Plus no need to prove herself all over again. “My advisors and professors have been super supportive. They’ve worked with me if I wasn’t able to attend a class I was able to work on my own.”

While designing is one of the main attractions to pursuing a mechanical engineer degree. Weimann’s approach has always been more hands-on. “More like let’s design it, build it and test it. Let’s do everything.”

Add to that Weimann’s “everything” also includes as raising a young daughter and working full time as a Supplier Engineer at Vollrath—a commercial food-service equipment fabricator with a 150-year history in Sheboygan—all while earning her bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering.

“My hope is, because I go very part-time, to graduate by 2024.” Her plan continues— now designed, built and tested.

Photo of the Covid-19 virus enlarged under a microscope with text, "Covid-19 why it matters: What is long-hauler syndrome?"

Video COVID-19 Why it Matters: Part 18, What is long-hauler syndrome?

This video series features UW-Green Bay’s Immunologist Brian Merkel on COVID-19 and Why it Matters. This series empowers viewers with knowledge to help them navigate through the pandemic. Merkel has a Ph.D. in Microbiology & Immunology from the Medical College of Virginia. He is an associate professor in UW-Green Bay’s Human Biology & Biology programs and has an appointment at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He will be responding to a number of questions related to COVID-19 and try to get behind the “why” it’s important to be educated in your decision-making as we navigate the pandemic together.

Video Transcript – COVID-19 Why it Matters: Part 18, What is long-hauler syndrome?

Hello, I am Brian Merkel Microbiology and Immunology at UW-Green Bay and we’re here to talk about why COVID-19 matters to you.

One of the things I think that makes this virus unsettling has to do with the so-called long-hauler syndrome. And what I think is disturbing about this reality is that there’s a significant proportion of people that do become exposed, develop these long-term lingering effects that can last up to months.

Now based on what we know, there are two populations of people that enter into this syndrome. There are two outcomes, one leads to permanent damage to the lungs the heart to the kidneys. And then there’s another proportion of that group—these long haulers—that recover after weeks to months of time. The best guesstimate right now, is that this is roughly 10 percent of all individuals, no matter how mild, even asymptomatic they were when they were infected initially. The concern that over time, weeks later after their exposure, they developed these other symptoms.

Once again, I think the lesson when we talk about COVID-19, is that this is a highly, highly unusual virus and we should all be concerned about it no matter how healthy we are, what our age is because it is able to do very unusual things for reasons that are not fully understood. And you want to put yourself in the best position to avoid infection, no matter what your station in life is, what your age is, your health status is, because the long hauler syndrome is not something obviously that anybody ever wants to confront.

COVID-19 Why it Matters Video Series:

Introduction with Brian Merkel https://youtu.be/M-yYPSPk30Q

Part 1: What are viruses and where did this one come from https://youtu.be/DYbiIv8ICgs

Part 2: Two main types of viruses https://youtu.be/O-OVk3rx96s

Part 3: Why is this virus serious? https://youtu.be/EDFyNN8i5G4

Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask? https://youtu.be/FlcAvlt876Y

Part 5: I’m young! Why should I care? https://youtu.be/TDrEV_beY1U

Part 6: Can pandemics be stopped before they start? https://youtu.be/lgWnJZNYbFI

Part 7: Pandemic is not local, why wear a mask? https://youtu.be/IG3Sl3q-xH8

Part 8: Why does everyone need a flu shot this year? https://youtu.be/DGpBFj0fJkA

Part 9: What is the science behind a vaccine? https://youtu.be/eQ3FclkYaQo

Part 10: Where can I find accurate information? https://youtu.be/pLMlU5Xnkgo

Part 11: What type of mask should I wear? https://youtu.be/gCFHxQvkVYE

Part 12: Why HUGE COVID-19 spikes in Wisconsin? https://youtu.be/OuqmXvrDApY

Part 13: Fall break, protect yourself & others https://youtu.be/h21Ed_bBTE4

Part 14: Why is COVID-19 Testing so Important? https://youtu.be/Fr9VJZZrTE0

Part 15: What are COVID-19 Antibodies? https://youtu.be/J2lfJzoUEHI

Part 16: Will the vaccine protect against new COVID-19 variants? https://youtu.be/5l58jEZv3NQ

Part 17: Vaccine myths vs reality https://youtu.be/bGqLsRRbzVk

Part 18: What is long-hauler syndrome? https://youtu.be/f11b8nFpJiE

Get Phoenix Ready with the Career Closet!

The Career Closet is a resource available to currently enrolled UW-Green Bay students. Students may take up to five free items each semester—and those items are theirs to keep! During times of social distancing, the Career Closet is operating on an appointment basis. Students can schedule a visit by filling out a request form, found at uwgb.edu/careers. To prioritize students’ health, only one student visits at a time. Hand sanitizer and disposable gloves are available for use by visitors.

Program Coordinator Abigail Drapalik encourages interested students to make an appointment.

Career Closet
Career Closet is open for business (attire).

“The mission of the Career Closet is to provide access to free, professional attire to UW-Green Bay students who need to dress for success” said Drapalik. “Since its advent in Spring 2018, the Career Closet has been visited 350 times and over 750 clothing items have been checked out!”

Career Services is also currently accepting donations for the Career Closet. As members of the campus community clear out closets in the new year, don’t toss that professional attire too far! Despite the COVID-19 pandemic bringing about more virtual meetings, graduating seniors, especially, need professional attire to prepare for that post-graduation career, regardless if a job interview is virtual or in-person.

Those wishing to donate new or gently-used items should email Program Coordinator Abigail Drapalik at drapalia@uwgb.edu to schedule a drop-off in advance. Accepted items are new or gently-used professional suits, pants, dress shirts, suit/sport jackets, skirts, dresses, neckties and belts. Donations are tax deductible and a receipt is provided with request.

Story by Charlotte Berg, Marketing and University Communication student assistant

Photo of the covid-19 virus enlarged under a microscope with the text, "COVID-19 Why it Matters: Vaccine myths vs reality."

Video COVID-19 Why it Matters: Part 17, Vaccine myths vs. reality

This video series features UW-Green Bay’s Immunologist Brian Merkel on COVID-19 and Why it Matters. This series empowers viewers with knowledge to help them navigate through the pandemic. Merkel has a Ph.D. in Microbiology & Immunology from the Medical College of Virginia. He is an associate professor in UW-Green Bay’s Human Biology & Biology programs and has an appointment at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He will be responding to a number of questions related to COVID-19 and try to get behind the “why” it’s important to be educated in your decision-making as we navigate the pandemic together.

Video Transcript – COVID-19 Why it Matters: Part 17, Vaccine myths vs reality

Hello, I am Brian Merkel, Microbiology and Immunology at UW-Green Bay and we’re here to talk about why COVID-19 matters to you.

The vaccines that are currently available the Moderna vaccine and the Pfizer vaccine certain myths that are around in terms of this vaccine. There’s no evidence that this vaccine is going to alter your DNA, in that when you get immunized, you’re not being exposed to the virus itself, you get exposed to the RNA. The RNA gets inside your body. It allows our bodies ultimately to develop a response just to the one part of the virus that we need to make a response to. And it’s a very safe vaccine.

One of the things that you can expect, however, is that you may have a fever, you may not feel “right” because our immune systems are normally at rest. So, when we get immunized to things safely, we’re ramping up the immune system by design. All vaccines are different in terms of how efficacious that they are, but 95 percent is very good. As great as 95 percent sounds, which it is, one out of 20, even after immunization, if they get exposed, they certainly can become infected.

The more of us that become vaccinated, the better off we’re going to be. What this is going to do is to decrease the burden of this virus in the environment, in the population and once we get down below a certain threshold then we can begin to think about removing our masks and going back to the life that we used to know. So, when my opportunity comes around, I am really looking forward to getting immunized myself.

COVID-19 Why it Matters: Video Series:

Introduction with Brian Merkel https://youtu.be/M-yYPSPk30Q

Part 1: What are viruses and where did this one come from https://youtu.be/DYbiIv8ICgs

Part 2: Two main types of viruses https://youtu.be/O-OVk3rx96s

Part 3: Why is this virus serious? https://youtu.be/EDFyNN8i5G4

Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask? https://youtu.be/FlcAvlt876Y

Part 5: I’m young! Why should I care? https://youtu.be/TDrEV_beY1U

Part 6: Can pandemics be stopped before they start? https://youtu.be/lgWnJZNYbFI

Part 7: Pandemic is not local, why wear a mask? https://youtu.be/IG3Sl3q-xH8

Part 8: Why does everyone need a flu shot this year? https://youtu.be/DGpBFj0fJkA

Part 9: What is the science behind a vaccine? https://youtu.be/eQ3FclkYaQo

Part 10: Where can I find accurate information? https://youtu.be/pLMlU5Xnkgo

Part 11: What type of mask should I wear? https://youtu.be/gCFHxQvkVYE

Part 12: Why HUGE COVID-19 spikes in Wisconsin? https://youtu.be/OuqmXvrDApY

Part 13: Fall break, protect yourself & others https://youtu.be/h21Ed_bBTE4

Part 14: Why is COVID-19 Testing so Important? https://youtu.be/Fr9VJZZrTE0

Part 15: What are COVID-19 Antibodies? https://youtu.be/J2lfJzoUEHI

Part 16: Will the vaccine protect against new COVID-19 variants? https://youtu.be/5l58jEZv3NQ

Part 17: Vaccine myths vs reality https://youtu.be/bGqLsRRbzVk

Photo of the face a female golfer with her eyes closed laying down on the putting greens, surrounded by golf balls and a driver with the text, "M.S. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology Program UW-Green Bay."

Video: M.S. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology Program

When you apply to the Master of Science in Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology program at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, you will learn how to help athletes and other performers like musicians, actors, and business professionals enhance their performances by harnessing the power of psychological skills. Meet instructors who will share with you the scope of the program and walk you through the two vocational tracks available. Learn from students who talk about their career goals and how the M.S. Sports, Exercise, and Performance Psychology Program set them on the path to fulfilling their dreams. They also share their experiences of learning from CMPC-certified professors and of interning with Division I Athletics.

Video Transcript M.S. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology Program

This master’s program in Sports Exercise and Performance Psychology is ideal for any students who want to get more scientific knowledge working with athletes on improving their performance through psychological skill training.

We do expand beyond just the sports setting. When our students become CMPC credentialed, they can work with say an exercise participant who is looking to set goals to improve their health. We can work with music professionals in terms of singers or actors that may be experiencing anxiety before a performance. We can help them manage that anxiety. We can work with military personnel. Help them better manage their focus and concentration, so that they can be at their optimal best while they’re on that mission.

“I was really attracted to the fact that they give you your own kind of personal track. So, there’s the Applied track and then Thesis track. My main career aspiration is to work baseball because that’s a sport that I’m extremely passionate about. There’s the thesis track which will be really imperative in working with a professional sports team because they typically look for people who have research experience a Ph. D. and as well as that applied experience.”

“With the Applied track, I have the opportunity to do internships throughout the second year that I’m here, which will allow me to work with different athletes in order to gain that experience I would need to be able to work with them professionally.”

“Having Division 1 Athletics is a very amazing opportunity for a student to work with high-performance athletes. Students on our Applied track have in their curriculum two semesters worth of internships with the UWGB Athletic Department, the Music Department, the Green Bay Blizzard as well as Bellin Health and students also have the opportunity to establish their own internship opportunity if it’s a good fit for them.”

“It was pretty imperative that I go to a university that had instructors that were CMPC certified. So, the advantages of having your CMPC certification is that it acts as evidence that you have achieved the highest standards within the sport exercise and performance career field. To be able to have that certification is the first step being able to work with athletes, which is what I really would like to do as a future career.”

“My instructors have been fantastic, have been amazing, and have really helped my experience here just be absolutely wonderful and I’m very appreciative towards that.”

University Leadership Awards Virtual Celebration

Congratulations to the recipients of the University Leadership Awards and Chancellor’s Leadership Medallion recipients. You can see the entire celebration, including reflections from campus leaders and highlights of individual winners on the UW-Green Bay Student Life webpage. Watch the celebration.

Fall 2020 Award Recipients

Chancellor’s Leadership Medallion

Libby Courchaine
Faith Klick
Kody Klumb
Kyle Klumb
Rebecca Kuhl
Haley Marks
Makayla Nelson
Dylon Pokorny
Rachel Terry
Emily Wolf

University Leadership Award

Amelia Boylan-Knorr
Patrick Brodhagen
Marina Delbecchi
Vanessa Depies
Katelyn Desrochers
Lindsay Fanning
Alexandria Keiler-Klein
McKennah Matulle
Tatiana Monterrosa
Jesse Rehn
Liesl Sigourney
Kyla Yeadon

Photo of Water Science students wearing waders and standing in the marsh area in the Bay of Green Bay as they study Water Science at UW-Green Bay.

Video: UW-Green Bay Water Studies students have miles of laboratory at four coastal campuses

Who will step up to solve critical water resource issues? Maybe YOU. Study Water Science at UW-Green Bay with miles of coastal laboratory and hands-on research. Get those waders ready!

See more at the Water Science website.

Video Transcript Water Science Program: Water is one of the greatest resource challenges of the 21st century. And there’s nowhere like UW-Green Bay to study Water Science. With miles of laboratory at four coastal campuses, you can pursue your passion and help secure clean water for future generations. Learn water systems above and below the surface. Experience hands-on research in water quality and water quantity issues critical to our region, state and world.

Rise to the challenge at UW-Green Bay.

 

Associate Professor Brain Welsch, right, works with a student on a physics problem during COVID-19 precautions inside the STEM Center's Physics Lab at UW-Green Bay on Nov. 19, 2020.

Photos: Resolute Physics students power through the pandemic

During the pandemic, UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Brian Welsch (Physics), teaches inside the Physics Lab at the Brown County STEM Innovation Center on the Green Bay Campus. Physics students wear facemasks and sit six-feet apart as COVID-19 precautions. Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.

Resolute Physics Students Power Through Pandemic

– Photos by William Throndsen Photo/Video Intern, Marketing and University Communication.

Emily Fread

Emily Fread built a calling into a career with a little help and a new certificate program

Like many freshly-minted college grads Emily Fread had her bachelor’s degree in Psychology—but wasn’t sure of her career path. Then she found her “calling” (as she calls it) as the development director at Habitat for Humanity Lakeside in Sheboygan. A dream job with a degree that didn’t quite fit. Plus, attending college and working full time presented a daunting logistical challenge. The solution? A certificate program with UW-Green Bay’s Division of Continuing Education and Community Engagement.

“I’m currently taking the Excellence in Nonprofit Leadership Certificate Program,” Fread says. “My supervisor and I learned about the program through an email and we thought it would be a great experience for me to acquire more leadership skills at nonprofit resources.”

What makes a program like this work for Fread is a unique combination of resources and flexibility that would be difficult to replicate on your own. The program is entirely online and meets once a week on Friday for two and a half hours. And it’s not just the class work that’s valuable but also her class members. “There are teachers and other students I can reach out to in the future if I ever need anything.”

Fread also appreciates how the instructors accommodate the demands of working professionals, “They’ve really set me up for success, plus provided a lot of resources I can use going forward, especially networking with other people. There’s lots of flexibility and I appreciate that.”

Any advice for those weighing their continuing education options?

“I thought being employed full time would make it hard to manage going back to school part time. What can be helpful is to think back why you are doing this in the first place.” As in when your calling calls for blazing a new educational and professional path. Fread is accomplishing both. “It’s allowing me to flourish and develop the career I’ve been looking for.”

Book Cover: Why We Get Mad: How to Use Your Anger for Positive Change by Dr. Ryan Martin

Prof. Martin’s Psychology book to release in January

Portrait of Ryan Martin
Ryan Martin

Professor Ryan Martin’s (Psychology) book, Why We Get Mad: How to Ue Your Anger for Positive Change, will be released globally on Jan. 12, 2020, but is available on pre-order. While a Watkins title, Penguin Random House is distributing Martin’s book in the United States.

This is the book on anger, the first book to explain exactly why we get mad, what anger really is, and how to cope with and use it. Often confused with hostility and violence, anger is fundamentally different from these aggressive behaviors and in fact can be a healthy and powerful force in our lives.

Martin offers questionnaires, emotion logs, control techniques, and many tools to help readers understand better what pushes their buttons and what to do with angry feelings when they arise.

You can find it listed at the Penguin Random House site. Martin’s book is one of Watkins’ lead titles and is available across multiple retailers.