COVID-19 Testing savety monitor watching each swab to ensure no contamination

UW-Green Bay graduate student helps build COVID-19 drive-thru testing facility for rural Kentucky

Jennie Morehead says she uses the information she learns at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay every day, even when she’s building a COVID-19 test site. She is currently a student in the Master of Science in Health and Wellness Management program.

Jennie Morehead
Jennie Morehead
Jennie Morehead wearing a face mask
Jennie Morehead with face mask

Morehead, who lives in Paducah, Kentucky, was working as the executive director of wellness at HealthWorks Medical, LLC when COVID-19 hit. With the pandemic, she wasn’t able to provide that in-person patient care anymore. But when an anonymous donor offered to pay for 1,000 test kits and processing, her company jumped at the chance to be able to provide that service to their community.

Using a church parking lot and outbuilding breezeway, a donated trailer from Fishing League Worldwide (FLW), and $250,000 from their anonymous donor, Morehead and members of a community wide taskforce were able to build the facility in a couple of days, she said. The effort was led by Morehead’s boss, Kyle Turnbo, MD, FAOCM, MPH, MRO.

The testing facility used the breezeway to house the actual testing process. The donor paid for the breezeway to be enclosed by a local contractor, complete with two automatic garage doors, for patients to enter and exit while staying in their vehicle. The FLW fishing trailer with a stage and office allowed staff to safely collect patient data prior to testing.

“When our owner, Dr. (J. Kyle) Turnbo, got that call, he said, ‘Well, we’ll just build our own site,’” she said. “And he made a community task force of our local Baptist hospital and our local Mercy hospital and then he said, ‘Look, I’ve got the tests. We’ve got the staff. We’ll be happy to run it if you all will help us build a site. That way the patients can stay out of the hospital, they can stay out of the doctors’ offices and we test them, and any physician that wanted to order a test could do that and it’s free.’”

Prior to working in corporate wellness, Morehead worked in safety engineering, so she called her construction contacts. Her husband, a retired professional fisherman, called his contacts with the FLW. Using the parking lot and annex building of a local church, they were able to create the testing site in three days.

“So a car can drive in and we shut the door behind them and they can be tested out of the wind out of the elements that we don’t have to worry about cross-contaminating,” she said. Having the testing happen inside also helps with HIPAA regulations, she said.

Morehead said she had just started her studies at UW-Green Bay when the outbreak started, but that she uses what she learns almost daily.

“When I started looking at what the topics were and what the classes were that were offered at the University, it was something I could see practicality in each of those classes that could I could immediately apply back into our work which is what I’m doing now,” she said. “You know, every time I take a class I’m like ‘Oh! I wish I’d known that before I did that program or I wish I’d know that before we developed this.’”

In addition, she said, her professors were great to work with as she managed working and studying at the same time.

“My professors, all of them have been more than kind because I started on March the 10th. And everything went crazy on March 11th. And they’ve been really nice to work with because you can only do so much in the day, and I appreciate their willingness to work with me on when assignments are due.

“I chose UW-Green Bay because I wanted to have an academic degree in wellness as our corporate wellness division is bidding wellness program work on a national platform. We service the majority of the national river industry and now national companies that have locations all over the United States. My first career was in heavy industrial construction occupational safety and health engineering. When bidding work nationally, my CV is often requested by potential clients, and I wanted my academic background to show that I am more than qualified to lead my team in corporate wellness while drawing from my experience as a safety and health engineer. UW-Green Bay was the only school I could find that seemed to offer wellness classes that I could transpose into the non-academic world almost immediately.”

So far, the drive-thru test site has tested more than 930 residents from Kentucky, Tennessee, Missouri and Illinois, she said. All of those tested have been ordered to get tests from their doctors. Now that the free tests are almost gone, the task force will enter phase two of the testing program, closing down and cleaning up the drive-thru testing site, and opening up another one somewhere else.

Instead of the three days it took to bring the drive through site together, the process for closing down and cleaning up the drive-thru site and opening up another testing site is expected to take a little longer – between three and four weeks, Morehead said.

Story by Liz Carey

UW-Green Bay’s New Venture Acceleration students lead the way in business idea contest

Teams reigned supreme in the Spring 2020 UW-Green Bay (virtual) Business Idea Pitch Contest, recently. A team of four Business Administration majors from the UWGB New Venture Acceleration studio accelerator class took first place in the Spring 2020 (virtual) Business Idea Contest. Their business idea, Caps Off (pictured), is a better way to recycle plastic by using a smart vending machine and a rewards system.

Each semester for the past three years, UW-Green Bay has held business idea pitch contests on its campuses. The contest is open to all UW-Green Bay students of all majors. Dental City provided the cash prizes for this spring’s contest. Every student earning one of the top four prizes was a Business Administration major.

First place—The Caps Off team of Business Administration majors, Molly Hurrish, Kody Kohke, Cory Gruendemann and Kayla Wendland, took home the first place $500 cash prize from Dental City.

Second place—Joe Doro, Sydney Gille  and Brett Nimz, finished second and received $250. Their business idea, 3C, better Connects volunteers to Collaborate and Contribute with charities via an online avenue for completing specific social responsibility projects, community building projects and relationship creating projects.

Third place—Noah Redfearn, Emily Walczak, Brody Wiest and Maddie Yoss (Business Administration). Their business idea, Local2You, provides small business owners, inventors, crafters and artists a full-service way to get their products marketed and sold online from locally to globally.

Fourth place—and the winner of the People’s Choice Award from the cumulative votes of UW-Green Bay alumni entrepreneurs and UW-Green Bay employees—was the team of Jocie Georgeson, Valerie Ploeckelman, and Erin Reinke. They are the inventors of The Comeback CaneTM and earned $100 cash from Dental City. The Comeback CaneTM won’t fall to the ground when users drop it, preventing cane users from further injury as a result of having to pick up their canes.

Fifth place—and the winners of $50 from Dental City, was the team of Emily Barnes (Accounting), Lydia Delikat-Mitchell (Art) and Brianna Pritzl (Business Administration) with their business idea of SoapShop, a plastic-free high quality shampoo and conditioner retailer of high quality products in refillable aluminum bottles. The solution reduces single-use plastic.

For more information on UWGB’s entrepreneurship program (certificate for all majors, emphasis in the Business Administration major, contests open to all majors), please contact lecturer of entrepreneurship Ryan Kauth at KauthR@uwgb.edu or visit www.uwgb.edu/entrepreneurship.

In the photo from left to right: First-place prize winners, Molly Hurrish, Kody Kohke, Cory Gruendemann and Kayla Wendland.

Photo of student teaching children at Meadowbrook Elementary School in Howard, Wisconsin. The students are reading a book at the table. The teaching student is from UW-Green Bay and is finishing her student teaching before she graduates.

Video: Thank you educators! Hear from one of UW-Green Bay’s future teachers

Majriela Macedo always knew she wanted to help kids learn. She is currently completing her bachelor’s degree in Education and will be graduating in May of 2020. Majriela participated in the Phuture Phoenix Program, Zeta Omega Tau Sorority, Greek Life at UW-Green Bay, and has extensive volunteer experience in the community as a member of these organizations. Majriela hopes to teach in an elementary or middle school after graduating.

Video by Sue Pischke, Marketing and University Communication

UW-Green Bay’s new and innovative executive IMPACT MBA Program is seeking its first cohort of students for the fall semester

There’s no other program like it in the state. Applications now being accepted; prior business degree is not a prerequisite. Subjects covered include Interactive Artificial Intelligence, Cybersecurity, Banking Models, Blockchain and more. Structured as a blend of online and face-to-face classes, and the complete program takes less than 2 years with summers off. (Attach release link when live)

UW-Green Bay’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences to host a virtual conference, May 4-15

During the weeks of May 4 and May 11, the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (CAHSS, pronounced “cause”) will host a Virtual Conference to showcase the student work from across the semester. Whether it’s original research, musical performances, compositions or poems, or a host of other projects, students from CAHSS have been working hard all semester long and organizers want to provide a space to share that work with the public.

On May 4, 2020, www.cahsseffect.org will be replaced by CAHSS Virtual for the last two weeks of the semester. This virtual space will provide a venue for student presentations, music, research posters, written works, and other sorts of presentations and performances along with opportunities for synchronous presentations via Blackboard Collaborate Ultra. To learn more, follow uwgbcahss on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

UW-Green Bay students face fierce competition but 100 percent land dietetic internships

Every one of the 15 senior students applying for a dietetic internship (DI) program this year received a placement, according to Sara Wagner, MS, RDN, director of the Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics. The DI is the next step for graduating seniors to fulfill 1,200 required practicum hours and gain the skills necessary to take the registered dietitian examination.

“Competition for dietetic internships is fierce with only 50 to 65 percent of national applicants receiving a match each year,” said Wagner. “This year all 15 senior applicants earned a match, with many of our students matched to their first choice program.”

Over the last six years UW-Green Bay has matched 82 of the 90 seniors applying (91%).

“Our success is a testament to the dedication of our students, the quality and rigor of the Nutrition and Human Biology Programs, the mentoring provided by our faculty, and high impact practices in and out of the classroom,” Wagner said.

Below is the list of students and their internship sites:

Paige Gorges– Nicholls State University, LA+
Gildardo Martinez Juarez – Viterbo University, La Crosse
Brooke Martin – Priority Nutrition Care, Boston (distance track)
Carly Herr – Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN
Carolynn Claussen– North Oaks Medical Center, LA
Sydney Walker – University of Kentucky Hospital, KY
Kennedi Verhoof – University of Northern Colorado (distance track)
Eric Schley – Marywood University, PA
Kirsten White – University of Houston, TX
Corey Haack – Wellness Workdays (distance track)
Emily Joppe – UW-Green Bay
Amanda Burkel – UW-Green Bay
Tad Taggart – UW-Green Bay Pre-Select Program
Rachel Rice – UW-Green Bay Pre-Select Program
Elena Garcia – UW-Green Bay Pre-Select Program

  

Director of Counseling and Health, Henniges, talks about resources

Video transcript:

I am Amy Henniges, the Director of our Counseling and Health Center. I would like to take this opportunity to thank you all of you who are helping to flatten the curve of the spread of COVID 19 by following the guidelines of Staying Safer at home.

Additionally, I would like to thank all of the employees that are too essential to our campus operations to stay at home, for taking all the extra precautions to keep us safe.

Safer-at-home is our currently our best option for slowing the spread of the virus and flattening the curve so that our health care system has enough beds, critical care capacity, and healthy front line health care workers to take care of those most critically ill.

It is more critical than ever to maintain at least 6-feet social distancing and to continue to cover our cough and to wash our hands and disinfect surfaces.  

New this week, the CDC is also advising the use of simple cloth face coverings to wear in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores).  Simple masks or face coverings can slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it, from transmitting it to others. You also really want to minimize how often you are going out on essential errands.

Simple cloth face covering can be made out of made at home from common materials at low cost, like a bandana.

The COVID-19 pandemic, and the resulting changes to our lifestyles, can make anyone overwhelmed, anxious or even depressed. Please don’t hesitate to ask for help. Our campus support services remain open by phone. Our counselors, nurses and nurse practitioner are available for phone consultations with students. 

Check out our Counseling and Health website for phone appointment details, additional virtual care options for COVID Screenings in the community, and wellness resources and tips.

Employees have access to counselors by phone through our EAP program.

Finding healthy ways to cope and stay connected is so important. I also encourage you to check out the resilient.wisconsin.gov for additional tools to encourage self-care, maintain social connections, and reduce stress.

Staying Safer at Home is more important than ever, and we know it is not easy. We are all in this together and we are here to help.

UW-Green Bay students settle in to new lifestyle despite pandemic

In this story, May 2020 graduate Joshua Konecke, a Marketing and University Communication intern, describes how he and other students are adapting in an unprecedented learning and work environment.

It’s been an unprecedented four weeks as the world practices social distancing and staying at home in hopes of flattening the curve and slowing the spread of the Coronavirus. Students have been participating in receiving education from their residences through alternative delivery methods the past three weeks. This pandemic has brought about abrupt changes to our everyday life and has forced students to adapt to these circumstances. Everyone handles change differently, but the challenges we face are quite similar.

I am a senior graduating in May majoring in Communication and English. I moved out of my apartment on campus on March 18, and have been living at home since. I’ve found the delivery of online classes hasn’t been too difficult to adjust to, although I usually take at least one online class per semester, so I’ve had experience working with different methods of educational content delivery. The most difficult adjustment is maintaining a normal routine. Back in the day when classes were held on campus, which feels like an eternity ago, my Mondays and Wednesdays were the same, as well as my Tuesdays and Thursdays. There was a normal routine. Now, any given day could be entirely different depending on what I have to get done that week and when I have to get it done by.

While I don’t have a normal routine anymore, I maintain a semblance of normalcy by trying to work in 60-minute increments. Each day, I try and do something productive, whether it be homework, work, job searches, ect. four to five times a day in 60-minute segments. That way, I am being productive every day during different periods of the day, so I never go too long feeling like I’m not accomplishing anything.

Morgan Johnson, a junior earning a BFA in Writing and Applied Arts, with a minor in Arts Management, also has moved back home for the remainder of the semester. She has found it beneficial to try and do the homework for each class on the same days which she would have normally had the classes in-person. “It’s the best way I’ve found to hold myself accountable and make sure I don’t procrastinate,” she said.

Additionally, Morgan has tried to make her home feel more academic, as she hasn’t done many homework assignments at home since high school. While the first week of online learning was definitely an adjustment period for her, once she figured out how to make her room feel more like her dorm, she was able to better acclimate to learning from home, allowing her to maintain familiarity through routine study and organizational habits she had on campus. “Once I did that, I felt more motivated to do work,” Morgan said.

Another graduating student this May, Zach Schneider, majoring in English, Humanities and earning a BFA in Writing and Applied Arts, with a minor in Education, elected to stay on campus. Zach is used to seeing people move through the residence halls, but now there isn’t many people. “It’s a bit eerie living on campus. The place is pretty dead,” said Zach. People have been consolidated to certain buildings so everyone has access to a kitchen, so some people abruptly got new roommates. While all of Zach’s roommates chose to stay on campus, he knows a few people who got new roommates and have struggled to adjust to that change in the midst of everything else going on. The changes with campus dining haven’t affected Zach, as he cooks for himself. “I just try to go to the grocery store less often,” said Zach.

Although Zach has lost his normal routine, he has found it helpful to make lists on virtual post-it notes of what he needs to get done each day. These lists help him keep track of due dates and deadlines for assignments and projects, which serves to keep Zach motivated. “The biggest challenge I face is motivation. I usually am great at self-motivating, but it’s a lot harder when there aren’t physical classes to keep my head straight. My strategy to overcome my lack of motivation has been being aware of due dates and the desire to finish my last semester with good grades,” Zach said.

A non-traditional student coming from California, Wayne Borowski, is a senior graduating in May majoring in English and minoring in Film and Cinema Studies. Coming from California, where he had to take months off from school at a time, this adverse situation isn’t of total unfamiliarity to Wayne, but still distressing nonetheless. “I’m a bit more adjusted now, but the first few weeks were marked by a sense of surrender and loss,” Wayne said.  Some of the classes or clubs Wayne is a part of don’t translate well to online platforms, so many projects have either been cancelled or, at the very least, considerably marred.

Wayne has noticed the days becoming jumbled here and there, and some of his usual customs have vanished, but he has found a silver lining during these tumultuous times. “There has been understanding and patience all-around, and in some ways, despite the distance between everyone, there have been moments throughout this ordeal in which I have felt closer to many of my peers and professors than perhaps I ever had before,” Wayne said. Wayne’s college journey has been anything but ordinary, but he recognizes this experience, along with his previous college experiences, will have him graduating in May as “twice the individual I had been before I embarked on this journey.”

Whether you are at home, living on campus or a non-traditional student, you are likely facing some of the same challenges. Although the last six weeks of the semester will undoubtedly be challenging for many students, it is something that we all are going through, and we will all get through, together.

Story by Marketing and University Communication intern Joshua Konecke ‘May 20
Photo –  Joshua Konecke in his new student/employee work space

Front door with colorful paper hearts taped to the side-light windows.

UW-Green Bay faculty members create a Pandemic Poetry Exchange

UW-Green Bay Professors Alise Coen (Political Science, Public & Environmental Affairs) and Jessica Van Slooten (English, Women’s & Gender Studies) were featured in a local news story for their creation of an interdisciplinary Pandemic Poetry Exchange group. The pair talked to reporter Diana Bolander for the Herald Times Reporter.

Alise Coen
Alise Coen

The group has grown to more than 200 members on Facebook and offers a supportive creative space to help cope with physical distancing.

The Facebook group is called ‘VanCoen Pandemic Poetry‘ (a combination of their last names) and has more than 225 members. The group’s guiding principle is to be ‘a supportive space for members to read, create and share original poems (broadly defined) to help cope with social distancing and quarantine-like conditions during the COVID-19 situation.

Jessica Van Slooten
Jessica Van Slooten

Both Coen and Van Slooten said they find that the group helps them feel more connected to the world while in isolation.

Coen noted: “I am comforted and inspired by our group as a supportive space for sharing art through words. The poems shared are sometimes humorous, sometimes somber and almost always descriptive of people’s different experiences and perspectives.”

 

 

A poem and photo by Van Slooten:

Front door with colorful paper hearts taped to the side-light windows.Fold the paper vertically
and curve the scissors just
so: begin with a point,
flare into generous cures,
and finish in a deep cleft.
Unfold your heart.
Remember they come in all
shapes, sizes, colors.
Make a rainbow of hearts:
love is love is love.
Put two hearts together
to form wings, and fly.
Imagine every paper heart
beating steady, strong,
a talisman to heal broken
hearts, heart failure.
Tape the hearts on windows
and doors: spread the love

Not Aleppo by Coen

Tending to street cats
In the middle of war
The man in Aleppo
Knows far more
About trying to find peace.
Me with my books
With my smart phone in bed
Using words to escape
The traps in my head
Safely sprawled under fleece.

Still, I fell nervous
In my privileged bombless nights
Mulling over viral posts
Of healthcare worker plights
And epicenter quakes.
By the light of my screen
That comforting glow
The fear is well disguised
As a thing I need to know
So I read all the takes.

Photo of a laptop playing Mary Gichobi drawing on her PowerPoint lesson

Professor Gichobi is teaching aspiring teachers Mathematics in a new way

Students in the Professional Program in Education are fortunate to have Assistant Prof. Mary Gichobi teaching EDUC 281 Conceptual Foundations of Elementary Mathematics. The course teaches aspiring teachers how to teach mathematics concepts common to the curriculum of elementary and middle schools.

Mary Gichobi
Mary Gichobi
Assistant Professor
Education Program

Gichobi covers areas such as the processes of abstraction, symbolic representation and notational manipulation in arithmetic contexts as well as examines topics such as multiplying and dividing fractions, decimals and ratio and proportional reasoning using different strategies”.

“Gichobi has been innovative and unflappable in moving her on-campus courses to alternate delivery,” according to Dean Susan Gallagher-Lepak.

In teaching EDUC 281, she goes through her PowerPoint slides and solves mathematical problems as she explains them, sort of like a narrated PowerPoint, but uses a software called Xodo to write on the PowerPoint. She screen records as she writes and then compresses it to a video using MP4.

Gichobi’s analytical strengths are equally balanced by a student-centered approach to teaching.

Animated gif of Mary Gichobi drawing on her PowerPoint lesson
Animation of Mary Gichobi writing notes on her PowerPoint lesson.

“I always feel that our students deserve support and guidance to go through the challenging terrain of life,” Gichobi said. “They may get stuck and not know who to ask. I feel passionate to help them in little and any ways.”

Students seem to appreciate Gichobi’s efforts. One student communicated this week to Gichobi the below message:

“I would like to thank you for your video of the lesson… It was refreshing to hear you teach the lesson and explain it in detail. It makes this change feel more like being in class. Thank you for all your hard work in making this transition so smooth. I can’t imagine it has been easy for you or the other professors.”