Photo of the letters GB and a large heart with a phoenix carved in the lawn at the UW-Green Bay campus.

Video/Photos: UW-Green Bay staff member creates lawn art

A member of the Phoenix family (we have intel it is area coordinator of UW-Green Bay Residence Life, Jeff Willems) created an artistic lawn art depicting large hearts anchoring the words “UWGB Phoenix” with lawn clippings. The lawn art is located on a hill in the east housing lot.

 

Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.

UWGB Phoenix Lawn Art

– Video and photos by Sue Pischke

Phoenix Rising sculpture with trees in blossom in the background

Photo Gallery: Spring campus beauty

It appears the Phoenix is welcoming the UW-Green Bay family back to the nest. Photographer Dan Moore captured some of the splendor of spring at UW-Green Bay, recently. Check out these gorgeous photographs.

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Spring 2020 Campus Beauty

– Photos by Dan Moore, Marketing and University Communication

Video: Chancellor Alexander congratulates and challenges honors graduates

Usually there would be a gathering to celebrate honors students. This year, Chancellor Mike Alexander has a special video message for honors graduates.

“Hi, my name is Mike Alexander and I have the honor and privilege of being the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. I’m very glad to be able to greet you today, and it’s still important that we take a moment to celebrate what you’ve achieved, so I will talk just for a few minutes about what I feel is important about being an honor student.

One, it shows that you’ve been able to work really hard through your college career. You’ve been able to persevere through challenges. You’ve been able to understand the importance of what an education means for your future and you’ve put yourself in a position now to be able to use it hopefully to benefit all around you.

And that last point, I think, is the most important thing I could talk about. That graduating with honors from a university means that you have an increased responsibility to do good in the world. It’s vital that those that are that are the most prepared, that have worked the hardest, that have the skills needed to be able to move our community and our region and our world forward, use them to be able to make our community a better place.

So I want to thank you for choosing UW-Green Bay for your education. It means a lot to us to have so many bright and talented students that come to our University. You’ve achieved a lot to be in the very top percentage of all of our graduates this year and that should not be taken lightly. I encourage you to remember, as you go throughout your career, the responsibility that you carry as a UW-Green Bay graduate to follow in the footsteps of the thousands who come before you who are doing great things in the world.

So thank you again, congratulations on your achievement, please keep in touch with us at the University and let us know the good things that are happening to you, the challenges that you face and we hope that we can always be resource for you throughout your career. Best of luck and thank you again.”

Hope to see many of you on August 22 for Commencement!

Title Graphic with a phoenix and the words, "UW-Green Bay Spring 2020 Senior Reflections

Video: UW-Green Bay spring 2020 seniors express their gratitude

UW-Green Bay Spring 2020 seniors reflect on their favorite memories and challenges and share their personal gratitude. To help stop the spread of COVID-19, UW-Green Bay rescheduled the 2020 Spring Commencement ceremony to Saturday, August 22, 2020. Let’s celebrate these seniors—this week and in August!

Video Transcript:

I am so proud to be a UW-Green Bay graduate. I have grown so much here as a leader and as a person. And I have made so many friends. And my professors know me by name. I am so proud to be a leader and I’m so proud to be a Phoenix. There are so many people I work with and who have taught me in my four years and it’s been amazing. And I’m so grateful for the time, wisdom, energy, patience—literally everything that they have poured into me. And I’m a much better, much more confident person because of them.

I’m really proud of myself for being a graduate, because odds were stacked against me. I’m a first-generation college student. I’m Puerto Rican. My parental figures were incarcerated. Addiction runs rampant in my family. I wasn’t just a number when I came here. I was a person they saw potential and they helped me to reach my full potential they helped me to do so much more than I ever thought that I would be able to do. What makes me most proud to be a UW-Green Bay graduate is just knowing the amount of opportunities that students have to get involved in the community and to get involved on the campus.

I’m proud to be an alumna of the University that gives it students incredible opportunities to be successful in their college career and in the future the thing I’m going to miss most about campus life is I’m going to miss seeing my friends every single day even on weekends when we were still able to hang out. Campus has a wonderful community feeling to it and that’s going to be something really hard to say goodbye to. Most of all I’m grateful that UWGB became so much more than just a place to go to school it became my home and it gave me a second family.

I definitely think that dealing with the COVID-19 challenges did make me stronger and more resilient because it really forced me to be a self-starter and self-motivated and to reach out to my professors if I didn’t understand something… or to really be a leader and take ownership of my academics.

It was a hard time for the class of 2020, who else can say they graduated in a pandemic and made it through! Plus, I ended up with some pretty good grades so I’m pretty proud of myself!

The thing that I’m going to miss most about campus is my professors. They are definitely a very good reason on why I have succeeded in the way that I have these past couple of years. The generosity and support that they have constantly shown me… it’s just absolutely astounding so I just definitely wanted to thank them. They are a very big reason why I got to where I am today.

I couldn’t ask for a better college experience. I’m so so proud of myself for what I’ve done and I’m so thankful to GB for helping me get there. I’m really proud to be a Phoenix and I’m really happy that we’re graduating and that we made it through, so go Phoenix! Happy graduation class of 2020! We did it and I’m really happy that I got to graduate with all of you and that I got to graduate from UWGB because it’s an experience that I’ll never forget and there aren’t enough words to say how grateful I am and how amazing college was at Green Bay.

UW-Green Bay, I love you and I’m really going to miss you. Go Phoenix.

 

Photo of baby geese swimming in a pond at the Wildlife Sanctuary in Green Bay, WI.

Video: Spring in UW-Green Bay’s Cofrin Memorial Arboretum

Spring flowers, blossoms, baby geese, deer and turkeys bring beauty to the Green Bay Campus and Northeast Wisconsin. UW-Green Bay’s Cofrin Memorial Arboretum forms a natural boundary of 290 acres encircling the campus that provides valuable habitat and an ecosystem for research, field trips, wildlife viewing and recreation.

Video by Sue Pischke, University of Marketing and Communication

Photo of an UW-Green Bay nursing student at Aurora Hospital during nursing training.

Video: UW-Green Bay’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing

As a young girl, Grace Stubb was drawn to jump in and help when somebody was sick or injured. Now she is a nursing student in her senior year at UW-Green Bay and will be graduating with a B.S. in Nursing. Along with her nursing degree, she also studied abroad in Spain and obtained a Spanish minor in hopes to communicate with patients in their primary language. Stubb recently landed her dream job and is now a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurse at St. Vincent Children’s Hospital in Green Bay.

Video by Sue Pischke, Marketing and University Communication

Video: Students, more emergency funding is available for those experiencing extreme financial difficulty as a result of COVID-19

Hi. My name is Jennifer Jones. I’m the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Services at UW-Green Bay. Today I’m here to tell you about a new resource for students who are struggling due to COVID-19 and the disruption of campus this spring. The federal government, though the CARES Act, gave the University $1.75 million to distribute to students who have financial need. There is a web form for that, as you can imagine.

What you need to do is just go to our website, uwgb.edu, search for “Phoenix Cares” If you searched for that website you will run into a button on the left hand side that is ”financial resources.” Under financial resources you will find a web form where you can fill out who you are, what your financial need is, upload some documents, hit submit. If you do that you’re going to be considered for all the funding that we have available to meet students’ needs today.

There’s CARES Act funding and there’s also institutional funding that we can supplement if you are not eligible for the CARES Act funding. So check the eligibility criteria, but don’t hesitate. Fill out the form and we will review that as fast as we can. We will get a response within five days and we will try and find as much opportunity for you as possible to meet your need, so don’t hesitate. Do that today. It’s important that you do it soon.

There’s limited funding and I want to make sure that you get what you need to continue towards your goals and your success. You have a whole team of people here ready to support you and now we have some more tools to be able to do that.

If you have any questions you can always email emergencygrant@uwgb.edu or as always our Green Bay One-Stop-Shop is available for you. Email gboss@uwgb.edu or call 920-465-2111. GBoss is there to meet any need you have, answer questions and route you to the right people to get your questions answered. Please don’t hesitate to reach out. Everyone across this University is here to see you achieve your success and I hope that we hear from you soon.

Take care and go Phoenix!

The Singular Adventures of Rabbit and Kitty BoyCover art

Prof. Kristy Deetz publishes ‘The Singular Adventures of Rabbit and Kitty Boy’

The Singular Adventures of Rabbit and Kitty BoyCover art
The Singular Adventures of Rabbit and Kitty Boy

The Singular Adventures of Rabbit and Kitty Boy by UW-Green Bay Prof. Kristy Deetz (Art) and her husband, Edward S. Louis, recently came out via Elm Grove Publishing and is available through all major book sellers.

Said to be “an inspired collection of intriguing paintings by Kristy Deetz, accompanied by charming and satirical stories by Edward S. Louis. Join the shape-shifting Rabbit, along with his best friend and astute sidekick Kitty Boy (both close friends of The Artist) as they venture into a land of visual and linguistic imagination, enthusiastically posting as art critics! Clever conversations between the two characters spark interpretation of the images, connecting with ideas from art history and theory, along with subtly dark humor—and plenty of puns!”

Kristy Deetz
Kristy Deetz

It’s been a busy year for Deetz: At the February College Art Association Conference, Feb. 12-15, 2020, Hilton Chicago, Deetz participated in the following events. (CAA, as the preeminent international leadership organization in the visual arts, promotes these arts and their understanding through advocacy, intellectual engagement, and a commitment to the diversity of practices and practitioners, she chaired and presented in the panel session, An Overview of Contemporary Painting and Materiality. She spent a year organizing and preparing for the session that included Jason Mitcham, one of our former artists-in-residence from the University of Florida. She is currently seeking publication options for the presentation. Here’s more:

Many contemporary painters have made materials the principal actor in their works, taking center stage with regard to meaning, form and content.  What does this new materiality propose? Studying the materials in a painting uncovers process, metaphorical associations of physical substances, and evolving meaning or power to signify, as well as the materials’ aesthetic qualities. Materiality draws upon such diverse fields as material culture, anthropology, technology, and the history of science.  A study of painting materials opens new dialogues and layers of interpretation that cross socio-economic and cultural boundaries, uncovering questions about our global economy. Materiality encourages reciprocal influence of studio disciplines opening new investigations of what is painted on and painted with along with possibilities of the immaterial, ephemeral, durational, or conceptual in painting. Might this current focus on materials in contemporary painting be fueled by technological breakthroughs in the world of material sciences? Is it a response to our virtual, digital world and ‘screen’ culture? Or an increasing awareness of global climate change and the environment?  This session includes an overview of the topic with individual panelists presenting their unique approaches and perspectives to materials within the current milieu. 

For the session Art Happens: Amazing Women, she interviewed internationally acclaimed Chicago artist, Phyllis Bramson. Through four sequential conversations, this session features successful women artists, who have maintained highly productive creative practices from 20 to 50 years. Interviews: Reni Gower and Virginia Derryberry; TeaYoun Kim-Kassor and Edra Soto; Patricia Briggs and Miriam Schaer; Kristy Deetz and Phyllis Bramson.

This year she also served as Chair of the CAA jury for the Distinguished Teaching of Art Award.

Meanwhile, her artwork has been featured in two recent traveling exhibitions:  FLASHPOINT: Material / Intent / Fused. (Weavings, digital prints, and encaustic paintings.) Venues so far have been Piedmont Arts Museum, Martinsville, VA; Susquehanna Art Museum, Harrisburg, PA; and next, University of Southern California, Chico.  Compulsory Measures: (Three large acrylic paintings on cotton cloth.) Venues: Esther Prangley Rice Gallery, McDaniel College, Westminster, MD, The Art Museum, SUNY Potsdam; International Museum of Art and Science, McAllen, TX; The Pauly Friedman Art Gallery, Misericordia University, Dallas, PA.

Photo with graphic title picturing Senior Lecturer Nydia Villanueva preps for an experiment on quantitative analysis in the chemistry lab at UW-Green bay, as she gets ready to teach students in Principals of Chemistry II Lab at UW-Green Bay.

Video: Teaching Chemistry remotely, Nydia Villanueva

Here’s an example of teaching remotely. Senior lecturer Nydia Villanueva (NAS) preps for an experiment on quantitative analysis in the Chemistry Lab on the Green Bay Campus. Her students are taking Principals of Chemistry II Lab remotely.

Here she records the experiment and posts the video online.

Video by Sue Pischke, Marketing and University Communication