Admissions recruitment coordinator Alexandra Ritchie shares her story on WBAY tonight

UW-Green Bay’s Alexandra Ritchie’s first experience with racism was in first grade. At 12, she was diagnosed with clinical depression. Now, she’s shaping a powerful campus conversation. Alexandra expanded her story outside of campus, in an interview with Cami Rapson on Action 2 News at 10, tonight (July 30, 2020).

Campus mourns the passing of Betty Brown, staff member who authored ‘From the Beginning’

Betty Brown
Betty Brown

UW-Green Bay learned today of the passing of Betty Brown, a long-tenured staff member who among many other accomplishments penned the book, “UW-Green Bay: From the Beginning,” which documented the history of UW-Green Bay, from 1969 through 1990.

According to an obituary, she joined the academic staff of UW-Green Bay Center as public information officer, and two years later became coordinator of news and publications for the new four-year University. She was named director of news services in 1970 and director of news and publications in 1977. Mrs. Brown retired in 1990 and soon afterward completed a memoir of the early years of the University.

She had many interests including music, travel and lifelong learning. She and her husband Donald were among the founding members of Learning in Retirement (now LLI).

Betty Brown with students in the UW-Green Bay recording studio interviewing Chancellor Ed Weidner.
Betty Brown with students in the UW-Green Bay recording studio interviewing Chancellor Ed Weidner in 2004.

Betty received the campus award for community outreach in 1982 with the following words of recognition: Her “….service to the University…has never been bounded by her job description or her office hours and that she generously shared her professional knowledge, personal time, and talents with numerous community agencies and in service to the whole community.”

And upon her 1990 retirement it was noted, “they don’t bestow the title ‘ambassador’ on state employees, but in its 25-year history, the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay has certainly had no better ambassador than Betty D. Brown.”

Brown won numerous awards for the print, graphic design, and media promotional materials she created to market UW-Green Bay to the community across the globe.

She died peacefully at her home Monday, July 27, 2020. A memorial service will be scheduled in the future. Memorial gifts may be sent to the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Foundation in support of the Donald and Betty Brown Endowed Scholarship Fund, established in 2014 for students pursuing liberal arts degrees.

Her daughter Martha Brown ’76 (Urban and Regional Analysis) is a UW-Green Bay alumna.

See the full obituary.

UW-Green Bay Partners with Interapt and global training provider General Assembly to launch new tech training pathway for students

Program aims to reduce barriers to entry in tech and create new technology jobs

GREEN BAY, Wis.—The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is teaming up with Louisville-based tech company Interapt and global education provider General Assembly to launch a new tech training pathway for people in the Green Bay area.

With unemployment at an all-time high in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, the software engineering program will provide tuition-free technical training to a class of 25 individuals, giving them an opportunity to develop the technical skills needed to kickstart a new career in data science, software development, digital marketing, UX design, robotic process automation, information technology and other tech related fields.

“We’ve changed countless lives through our program,” said Interapt CEO Ankur Gopal. “There are plenty of people out there with the aptitude and grit to learn new skills and change careers, but they don’t have options. At Interapt, we’re dedicated to opening doors and providing opportunities for deserving individuals, so they have a chance to grow and flourish.”

Interapt’s model grew out of growing demand for technical talent. Like many companies across the nation, Interapt struggled to fill open positions, so instead of recruiting top tier talent from traditional pathways, Interapt piloted scholarship-based training programs to reskill and upskill their local community members to great success.

The training model combines immersive technical training with General Assembly and on-the-job mentoring with Interapt. The program is approved as a registered apprenticeship in several states, and we have applied to Wisconsin’s Department of Workforce Development for similar approval. As the higher learning partner, the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay will prepare program participants for career advancement in software and technology related fields while providing credit for courses and additional certificate offerings to further develop their business and workforce readiness skills.

“We’re excited to partner with Interapt and General Assembly on this venture,” said UW-Green Bay Chancellor Michael Alexander. “Interapt’s program takes a unique approach to workforce development and will provide a transformative opportunity for people in the Green Bay community. We look forward to creating additional opportunities in new markets throughout Wisconsin in the near future.”

In Interapt’s most recent class, 20 students completed a rigorous 12-week Software Engineering course offered by General Assembly. Upon graduating, all 20 students secured IT-related roles. For many of the students, the program marked a life-changing turning point, enabling them to break through poverty and better provide for their families.

“In this period of economic uncertainty, it’s more important than ever that students and working adults from all over the country have access to the training and career services that are needed to be successful in today’s digitally-focused workforce,” said Jake Schwartz, CEO and Co-founder of General Assembly. “Having already worked with Interapt and seen the incredible results in similar regional hubs like Louisville, we couldn’t be more excited to kick-off training with the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay to empower and equip all individuals with the skills they need for the jobs of tomorrow.”

The partners are targeting a fall launch date. To ensure the health and safety of program participants, they are also exploring online training capabilities.

For more information on the program and corporate partnership opportunities visit: Website interapt.com/green-bay-training-program/or contact Ankur Gopal at: Ankur.gopal@interapt.com or 502-251-1511.

About the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is a comprehensive public institution offering undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs to more than 8,700 students with campus locations in Green Bay, Marinette, Manitowoc and Sheboygan. Established in 1965 on the border of Green Bay, the University and its campuses are centers of cultural enrichment, innovation and learning. The Green Bay campus is home to one of the Midwest’s most prolific performing arts centers, a nationally recognized 4,000-seat student recreation center, D-I athletics, an award-winning nine-hole golf course and a five-mile recreational trail and arboretum, which is free and open to the public. This four-campus University transforms lives and communities through student-focused teaching and research, innovative learning opportunities, powerful connections and a problem-solving approach to education. UW-Green Bay’s main campus is centrally located, close to both the Door County resort area and the dynamic economies of Northeast Wisconsin, the Fox Valley region and the I-43 corridor. UW-Green Bay offers in-demand programs in science, engineering and technology; business; health, education and social welfare; and arts, humanities and social sciences. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu.

About UW-Green Bay’s Division of Continuing Education and Community Engagement
The Division of Continuing Education and Community Engagement focuses its mission on creating educational opportunity and access for all ages, encompassing K-12 student programs, personal and professional development and customized training to meet the needs of a progressive economy. The division develops, collaborates and executes responsive solutions for diverse communities statewide, all of which reflect a deep commitment to inclusion, social justice and civic responsibility

About Interapt
Founded in 2011, Interapt is a technology services firm that helps companies address their software and technology needs. With expertise in fields such as custom software development, UX & Design, IT Support, and others, Interapt also helps companies develop a more robust and diverse talent pipeline. Interapt’s innovative training and apprenticeship program provides tuition-free training to the unemployed, underemployed, and Veterans and their spouses, providing them an opportunity to launch promising new careers in the tech industry. To learn more about Interapt and their training programs, visit https://interapt.com.

About General Assembly
General Assembly (GA) is a pioneer in education and career transformation, specializing in today’s most in-demand skills. The leading source for training, staffing and career transitions, GA fosters a flourishing community of professionals pursuing careers they love. Focusing on the most relevant and in-demand skills across data, design, business, and technology, GA confronts the global skills gap through award-winning, best-in-class instruction and innovative opportunities across diverse communities. GA works with students online and in-person across the globe and partners with top employers to help companies source, assess and transform talent. To learn more, visit https://generalassemb.ly.

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Registration is open for Lifelong Learning Institute

At UW-Green Bay, learning is a lifelong pursuit, and the member-led Lifelong Learning Institute (LLI) isn’t going to let coronavirus get in the way of delivering enriching and engaging classes in a safety-conscious way for members. LLI is a 20+-year strong membership program developed by retirees for retirees. Susan Pike, Program Specialist, and volunteers on the curriculum committee, worked diligently and creatively with a network of instructors developing courses in formats best suited to the subject matter. Instructors include existing and retired faculty, local experts and enthusiasts. Class formats encompass online live, online recorded and outdoors. Topics cover art, fitness, government, health, history, reading, writing, science, nature, religion, special interest and travel. Over 120 interactive and fascinating subjects! Registration is completely online. A gorgeous 20+-page catalog of classes is available at www.uwgb.edu/lli Monday, July 27, and at 10 a.m. registration will also open. Registration closes August 14 at 4 p.m. Join today, because TOGETHER, WE LEARN.

Dystopian Landscapes – new work by Professor Berel Lutsky at Gallery 2622

The work in this show—Dystopian Landscapes—was conceived and executed before the pandemic by UW-Green Bay Prof. Berel Lutsky (Art) at Gallery 2622—and was supposed to have been shown this April.

“The world has changed considerably since then, only making the title of the show that much more relevant. I am pleased to be re-opening John Korom’s Gallery 2622 and bringing back the possibility of seeing art in person vs. just on the screen. Making this possible will require a few departures from the ‘usual’. You are invited to come to Gallery 2622, at 2622 N. Wauwatosa Ave. on August 7 from 6 to 9 p.m. for a socially distant opening reception for Dystopian Landscapes.”

Necessary precautions to ensure everyone’s health will be taken and is as follows: Masks will be required to be worn by everyone. If you do not have one, one will be provided. Hand sanitizer will also be available. The outside area in front of the gallery will be used for socially distant gathering. There will be a few chairs but you may want to bring your own. Hospitality will be provided in unopened single serve containers for snacks and drinks. The number of people in the gallery will be limited to ten at a time.

To help facilitate this we are asking people to rsvp to lutskyb@uwgb.edu >subject line: Aug, 7, with a preferred time slot between 6 to 9 p.m. Times will be assigned with the goal of limiting the number of people present at any one time to twenty or so. We thank you in advance for your cooperation. If you cannot attend the opening, want to spend more time with the work, or bring someone else to see the show, Gallery 2622 is open by appointment. Please call either 414-339-5159, or 414-257-2622 to set one up.

“Most dystopian literature is based on what occurs after a catastrophic event, global war, pandemic, invasion by alien life etc. destroys society as we know it. In truth it will most likely be a more gradual, but no less awful process that will likely have the same result. Artist/Philosopher Adrian Pipers’s 2018/2019 retrospective exhibit was shaped by various iterations of the statement: “ Everything will be taken away….”.

“In her dual roles as artist and philosopher Piper uses this statement, which first appeared in her work in 2003 and is distilled from a passage by Alexander Solzhenitsyn, ‘Once you have taken everything away from a man he is no longer in your power. He is free,’ as a centering mantra.

It has appeared repeatedly mostly as ephemera, on outdoor installations, written in marker on people’s foreheads, in the gallery as photographs documenting the ephemeral instances, and poignantly repeated on large chalkboards as if written by a schoolchild who has misbehaved. A challenge, a warning, a comfort…. ? We are left to ourselves to choose, and realize upon careful consideration, that it may be all three, and more, all at once. The only certainty is that there will be change, and we should not be surprised. Much of my work for the past 30 years has been landscape based. Unlike traditional landscape it has rarely been about a place, history, or celebration of natural beauty. The images offer no escape to the pastoral, nor an idealized version of displaced nature. Instead they offer landscapes of possibilities, not all of them good ones. Unaddressed, climate change is inevitable, and if left to run its course the social order will collapse. ‘Everything will be taken away…..’. If we do wake-up in time, taking the necessary steps will also require drastic changes to how we choose to live on this earth. Everything will be taken away… however in this case to enable something new.”

Faculty note: Assistant Professor Miranda Schornack publishes article

UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Miranda Schornack (Education), published an article in the MinneTESOL Journal Spring 2020 Issue. Schornack co-authored the manuscript with Michelle Benegas and Amy Stolpestad from Hamline University (St. Paul, MN). The article is titled “How dispositions are(n’t) addressed in the English learner case study assignment and examines an assignment common in English as a second language methods courses—the English learner case study (or learner profile)—for dispositional development and explores how teacher educators can be more explicit and thorough in cultivating educator dispositions for working with multilingual students.”

David L. and Rita E. Nelson Family Fund continues to invest in Education

The David L. and Rita E. Nelson Family Fund within the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region recently awarded $2,362,100 in grants to local and state nonprofit organizations reflecting the charitable interests of the late couple and their family. The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay received $91,600 to add to the Rita E. Nelson Endowed Scholarship for Education Students Fund. The scholarship, at Rita’s alma mater, will provide two non-traditional students majoring in education with a $2,500 scholarship award annually.

“Nontraditional students come from all walks of life, and bring an expansive, critical repertoire of life experiences that enrich the classes and students they will one day teach,” says Pao Lor chairperson, Professional Program in Education, UW-Green Bay. “We are most grateful that many nontraditional students choose to pursue a career in teaching, and we are also most grateful there are individuals like David and Rita Nelson who shared the same vision and the generosity to provide the financial support to pursue it.” Last year’s recipient, Frances Nazario, said the news of her scholarship came at exactly the right time: “After this semester, I will no longer receive any kind of federal aid. So I’m pulling from wherever I can. And this came at a perfect time, because I just didn’t know if next semester was going to happen. And I was very scared because I have three semesters left.”

To UW-Green Bay and to the Nelson family, Frances says: “I don’t know if there are enough words for me to even express my gratitude. You’ve inspired me, and you’ve taken a big weight off my shoulders. A very humble thank you.”

University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s Lifelong Learning Institute Encourages Learning as Lifelong Pursuit

GREEN BAY, Wis.—At the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, learning is a lifelong pursuit, and the member-led Lifelong Learning Institute (LLI) isn’t going to let coronavirus get in the way of delivering enriching and engaging classes in a safety-conscious way for members.

LLI is a 20+-year strong membership program developed by retirees for retirees. LLI is offering more than 120 classes, virtually this year. Registration is open now through August 13, 2020.

Susan Pike, program specialist, and volunteer on the curriculum committee, worked diligently and creatively with a network of instructors developing courses in formats best suited to the subject matter. Instructors include existing and retired faculty, local experts and enthusiasts. Class formats encompass online live, online recorded and outdoors. Topics cover art, fitness, government, health, history, reading, writing, science, nature, religion, special interest and travel.

Classes are accessible online which means you can access courses anywhere – engaging at home, visiting your grandchildren or snowbirding elsewhere.

Notable instructors include Professor Ryan Martin, a nationally-known anger researcher, Susan Lepak-Gallagher, Dean of the College of Health, Education and Social Welfare, Erin Giese, Field Crew Leader for the Great Lakes Coastal Wetland Monitoring Program and John Chandik, retired meteorologist with WLUK-TV.

New members can register for up to 20 classes each semester. Join LLI for a tour into the Packers archives. If you are a history buff, you will enjoy classes about local history or major world events like “From the Holocaust to Civil Rights.” Naturalists can learn more about wildlife and the environment with classes like “Sustainability and Solar Energy.” There are also classes about food “Spreading the Word about Cheese, Spread, That is,” topical issues “Drugs in Brown County – Are Your Grandchildren at Risk?” And classes for fitness or fun like “The Art of Repurposing Thrift Shop Finds (and Your Stuff).”

The annual LLI membership fee is $125 – an average cost of $10.42 per month – and includes two semesters. You may register for up to 20 classes per semester.

More than 120 interactive and fascinating subjects! Registration is completely online. A gorgeous 20+-page catalog of classes will be available at www.lli@uwgb.edu Monday, July 27, and at 10 a.m. registration will also open. Registration closes August 14 at 4 p.m. Join today, because TOGETHER, WE LEARN.

For more information on the program visit: www.uwgb.edu/lli or contact Susan Pike, Program Specialist, at  920-465-2356.

About UW-Green Bay’s Division of Continuing Education and Community Engagement
The Division of Continuing Education and Community Engagement focuses its mission on creating educational opportunity and access for all ages, encompassing K-12 student programs, personal and professional development and customized training to meet the needs of a progressive economy. The division develops, collaborates and executes responsive solutions for diverse communities statewide, all of which reflect a deep commitment to inclusion, social justice and civic responsibility

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Wear your mask with Willow!

Assistant Prof. Jennie Young shared this photo of therapy dog Willow, ready and waiting to help students de-stress in the fall semester! Willow’s office hours will be released soon. Mask-ready, she is looking forward to her duty to protect the Phoenix community!

Willow with her mask

Photo Credit: Assistant Prof. Jennie Young

Phlash Mascot in a Mask illustration

It’s Phlash with a mask and a message

Phlash Mascot holding a sign with a stop the virus icon
Phlash the Phoenix reminds us to stay safe and stop the spread of COVID-19

“Bird watchers” have you spotted this one? It’s UW-Green Bay’s own Phlash sporting a mask, and the graphic is the new face of a communication campaign directed at your personal safety. It’s up to all of us—faculty, staff, students—on all four campuses to keep each other, and family and community members safe throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Health leaders will be using Phlash to communicate important messages and reminders through signs, videos and email. The three most important things to remember according to local health officials and the CDC:

  • Wash your hands
  • Watch your distance
  • Wear a mask

As Chancellor Alexander noted in his communication to our campuses and extended communities last week, “I am unable to predict exactly what will happen with education in the coming months. However, I know we are resilient. As the Phoenix, we are up for the challenge that lies ahead. We will rise into the unknown together.”