Tag: Womens and Gender Studies

Slideshow: Fencl, ‘After Thoughts’ and mysteries of the universe

After Thoughts speaker, Heidi FenclHeidi Fencl’s introduction during her March 5 After Thoughts address was perhaps not what attendees at the popular UW-Green Bay program are accustomed to hearing.

“If you came wanting to know, what is dark energy?, we’re done,” Fencl said with a smile. “Talk’s over. We don’t know.”

As it turns out, Fencl’s address, “The Universe Falls Up?! Dark Energy and the Accelerating Expansion of Everything,” was as much — maybe more — about questions surrounding astrophysics and the mysteries of the universe as it was about answers. In fact, Fencl’s talk would have been different had she given it even a semester ago, she told a full house in the grand foyer at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts. A January discovery surrounding dark energy again changed what scientists thought they knew, deepening this intriguing mystery and adding yet another layer to its story.

“So the story keeps building, is what I’m trying to tell you,” said Fencl, UW-Green Bay associate professor of Physics and Women’s and Gender Studies. “We’ve got this whole new twist to play with.”

But if Fencl’s talk presented more questions than answers, audience members didn’t seem to mind. She took them through an abbreviated yet intriguing history of astrophysics and discovery of the universe, from the 18th century “fuzzy objects” of French astronomer Charles Messier to the distance and brightness calculation techniques of early 20th century scientist Henrietta Swan Leavitt. From the known contributions of Edwin Hubble to the unknown questions of the future of the universe, Fencl brought an obvious enthusiasm to her address.

“I’m trying to get you interested and excited about that story, too,” said Fencl, who directed the UW System Women and Science program for five years before coming to the University in 2001.

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– Photos by Eric Miller, photographer, Office of Marketing and University Communication

Fencl’s After Thoughts address was the third such event of the 2012-13 academic year, which marks the third season of the popular program. Designed to connect women in the community with UW-Green Bay, the gatherings showcase faculty, staff and guests, and convene women after their workdays for learning, enrichment and fun. The sessions are so named because they provide “After Thoughts” for participants to take with them when they leave.

By design, After Thoughts talks delve into a wide variety of subjects, from physics to literature, the news media to theatre and history. UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Rebecca Meacham kicked off the 2012-13 After Thoughts season Oct. 1, with her talk, “Fiction’s Burning Questions: Novelists, History and the Creative Spark.” Nov. 13, Jeanne Stangel, UW-Green Bay’s Director of Development and the former Associate Director of UW-Green Bay Athletics, engaged an After Thoughts audience with her address, “The Green Bay Way: The Impact of National Recognition in Collegiate Sports at UW-Green Bay.” The final After Thoughts presentation of 2012-13, featuring Denise Bartell, associate professor of Human Development and Psychology, is slated for Tuesday, April 9.

The popularity of the After Thoughts program endures, attendees say — even when the questions outnumber the answers.

“So I just spent about 25 minutes,” Fencl said Tuesday, prompting audience laughter, “saying, ‘I don’t know.’ ”

Visit www.uwgb.edu/afterthoughts/ for more information about the series.

Theatre, Cofrin School partner on Business Ethics panel on ‘Radium Girls’

In partnership with the UW-Green Bay Theatre program, the Austin E. Cofrin School of Business presents an interdisciplinary panel examining the case of the so-called “Radium Girls.” The discussion is scheduled for 5 to 7 p.m. next Wednesday (March 6) in Phoenix Room C of the University Union. It coincides with the run of the UW-Green Bay Theatre production These Shining Lives, which opens Feb. 28. The play is the true story of women who fought back against the 1920s-era Radium Dial Company after their work at the company made them sick. Could history repeat itself?

Scheduled panelists and their areas of specialization are:
• Prof. Illene Cupit, Human Development, death and dying
Lisa LeComte-Gleason, consultant and senior HR professional with Humana, industrial safety
Sue J. Mattison, dean of the College of Professional Studies, occupational disease
Ronald Pfeifer, retired attorney, employment law
• Prof. Christine Smith, chair of the Women’s and Gender Studies program
Moderated by Ghadir Ishqaidef, instructor of Human Resource Management.

The program is free and open to all. RSVPs are requested but not required, click here.
 

International Women’s Day Luncheon is March 6

Space is still available for the UW-Green Bay International Women’s Day Luncheon, scheduled to take place from noon to 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 6, in Phoenix C of the University Union. Eastern European human rights activist Lubomira Slusna — a previous visitor to campus and host of traveling UW-Green Bay contingents in return — will make a presentation on the struggle for equality being fought by the Roma people of Slovakia. A light lunch will be provided. Lunch is free, but registration is required. Register online – click here. Sponsored by the Office of Student Life, the Office of International Education, and Women’s and Gender Studies.
 

Women’s and Gender Studies co-hosts ‘Graduating to a Pay Gap’

The UW-Green Bay Women’s and Gender Studies academic unit and the campus chapter of the American Association of University Women are collaborating to host “Graduating to a Pay Gap: Research Panel Watch Party and Discussion” from 2:30 to 4 p.m. this Thursday (Nov. 15) in the Union’s Christie Theatre. All are welcome. The topic is a recent report from AAUW that among recent college graduates, women earn less than their male peers.

Milwaukee Public Radio spotlights Camp Lloyd in second Cupit interview

We linked last week to an interview involving Psychology Prof. Illene Cupit of UW-Green Bay’s Human Development and Women’s/Gender Studies academic units. A nationally recognized scholar in the field of thanatology, she was interviewed about death and dying for a special series produced by Milwaukee Public Radio for its “Lake Effect” program. A second segment is now posted online, and it focuses on the innovative Camp Lloyd program for grieving children. Check it out.

Chronicle of Higher Education mentions UW-Green Bay’s grief policy
In the same vein, The Chronicle of Higher Education published a story recently headlined, “College Campuses Offer Policies and Support Groups for Students Facing Loss.” The article noted that a handful of colleges have a grief-absence policy for students, including Ball State University, the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, and Duke University’s Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. Read more.

Faculty note: Prof. Huh on gender, development issues

This happened in July but worth mentioning here, today: Assistant Prof. Yunsun Huh, a specialist in economics and faculty member in the Democracy and Justice Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies academic units, led a seminar at the Korean Women’s Development Institute in Seoul. The seminar’s title was “Gender and Capabilities.” Huh introduced concepts of her primary research about the effect of home-country gender status on the labor-market success of immigrants, and explored issues related to labor supply and self-selection of immigrants. She also took part in panel discussions regarding women’s development in Korea, current status of immigrants and their impact on the labor market in Korea, and global public policy with respect to immigration.
 

Cupit presents at national conference on student grief

Prof. Illene Cupit, professor of Human Development and Women’s and Gender Studies, recently returned from the Annual Conference on College Student Grief in Raleigh, N.C. Cupit was invited to present three papers, “Global Implications of College Student Grief,” “Grief Theories and Social Support,” and “Service Projects for Students.” Cupit is president of the national professional organization for death education and counseling (thanatology). For more on the conference, see their website.

Brown U scholar to keynote International Women’s Day Luncheon

On Thursday, March 8, from noon to 1:30 p.m. in the Union’s 1965 Room, UW-Green Bay will observe International Women’s Day with a discussion of international issues. Renowned Brown University scholar Anne Fausto-Sterling, an authority on the development of sexual identity and the biology of gender, will be the keynote speaker. A light lunch will be provided. Lunch is free, but registration is required. Sponsored by the Office of Student Life, the Office of International Education, and Women’s and Gender Studies. Register online.
 

Mark your calendars: Women’s History Month events start March 1

Women’s and Gender Studies, the Diversity Task Force and LGBTQ Resource Center are sponsoring a full slate of Women’s History Month events, beginning March 1. Designed to be educational and thought-provoking, these events cover topics from sexual identity and the biology of gender to Eleanor Roosevelt and feminist art. Mark your calendars, and see our full news release.

UW-Green Bay announces lineup for Women’s History Month 2012

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s Women’s and Gender Studies program, Diversity Task Force and LGBTQ Resource Center will celebrate Women’s History Month this March with a series of events designed to educate, inspire and prompt discussion of critical issues.

The Women’s History Month 2012 series kicks off at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 1, when speaker Jennifer Baumgardner will give a provocatively titled talk, “Putting the F’em in Feminism” — the name is a play off her recently published book — in Room 210 of Mary Ann Cofrin Hall on campus. Baumgardner is an award-winning filmmaker, activist, writer and professor whose work explores abortion, sex, bisexuality, rape, single parenthood and women’s power. Other on-campus events are as follows. All are free and open to the public.

• “How do Naked Newborns Become Boys or Girls?”: 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 7, Rose Hall 250. Speaker Dr. Anne Fausto-Sterling is a leading expert on the development of sexual identity and the biology of gender.

• International Women’s Day Luncheon: Noon, Thursday, March 8, University Union Alumni Room. Event is free, but space is limited. Please register online.

• “No Secret Anymore: The Times of Del Martin & Phyllis Lyon”: 4 p.m. Wednesday, March 21, University Union Alumni Room. This is a documentary of two partners in love and struggle over 50 years. Discussion will follow with Kim Nielsen, professor of Democracy and Justice Studies, History and Women’s and Gender Studies at UW-Green Bay.

• “Eleanor Roosevelt and Human Rights”: 2:15 p.m. Monday, March 26, Christie Theatre, University Union. Address features speaker Allida Black, research professor of History and International Affairs at The George Washington University, and project director and editor of “The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers.”

• “Womanhouse”: 4 p.m. Thursday, March 29, Studio Arts 411. Film, talk and feminist art workshop.

UW-Green Bay events are sponsored by Women’s and Gender Studies, the Diversity Task Force and the LGBTQ Resource Center. Information on community events, sponsored by the American Association of University Women, is available at greenbayarea-wi.aauw.net/.

UW-Green Bay is located at 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay, Wis.

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