Tag: student

Brass, Hand Drumming ensembles share concert Nov. 24

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Music program brings the fall semester to a close with an eclectic concert offering music from classical brass to African-inspired percussion as the Phoenix Brass Ensemble and Hand Drumming Ensemble share the bill at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday (Nov. 24) at the University Theatre in Theatre Hall on the UW-Green Bay campus. The concert is free and open to the public.

The student brass ensemble performs under the direction of Associate Prof. Adam Gaines, the trumpet and jazz studies director for the UW-Green Bay Music program. Prof. Cheryl Grosso, a percussion and world music specialist, directs the student drum ensemble.

The Phoenix Brass Ensemble will open the program with Daniel Hodgson’s “Three Marches of the American Revolutionary Days” featuring the General Green March, Banks of the Swale, and Shellpott Hill. Next up is “Divertimento for Brass and Percussion” by Karel Husa. The group will also perform “Pange Lingua” by Anton Bruckner, “Fanfare & Chorus,” by Dietrich Buxtehude, “Introduction and Allegro” by Robert Beadell, “March of a Marionette” by Charles Gounod, and “Satin Doll,” by Duke Ellington.

After a brief intermission, the UW-Green Bay Hand Drumming Ensemble will begin with “Rock Etude 16,” by Bill Douglas, followed by selections from Prof. Grosso’s Rhythm Chant series. Compositions featured will by “Rhythm Chant C&Rm,” Rhythm Chant MM,” “Rhythm Chant 14,” and “Rhythm Chant GG,” along with the composition “Rhythm Chant Finito,” arranged by members of the student ensemble.

UW-Green Bay is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. For more information.


Chalk Artist brings fun to University Union

As people traverse the hallways of the UW-Green Bay, they have probably noticed the beautiful chalk drawings that line the walls of University Union, bringing an artistic flare to our everyday lives. They might highlight the latest Coffeehouse brew, or draw attention to the next holiday event.

Who is the creator behind this unique and enjoyable art form? It’s UWGB student Kimmy Schwarzenbart, who has been an artist, of sorts, since her early days of crafts and coloring books.

Schwarzenbart is receiving plenty of praise for her work — most noticeable outside the Phoenix Club and the Common Grounds Coffeehouse, on campus. And just recently, she received a prestigious award for her work — taking home “Best of Show” honors at the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) Region V for drawings.

Schwarzenbart even gets paid for her talents, hired as a student graphic designer for the University Union.

“I saw a flier stating that the Union was hiring graphic designers and decided to apply even though I had no experience with graphic design programs at the time…A summer position opened up and I brought some sketchbooks and other art samples to the interview…I was obviously not ready for a graphic design position yet but, to my surprise, was hired to do the chalk drawings instead.”

Schwarzenbart is a Business Administration major with minors in Studio Art and Design Arts. She was inspired to declare her art minors by her teachers and supporters who would see her overwhelming amount of notebook sketches and encouraged her to keep drawing.

Her artistic talents came naturally to her at a young age but her mother is a large creative influence in her life. “I grew up watching her do crafts with sewing, photography, paint, and pastels. There was always a large amount of art supplies in the house to play with.”

Finding a way to preserve her medium is a future goal.

“Chalk is not the most permanent medium to work with…In the future I would like to find a way to preserve some chalk drawings, which may involve framing or other techniques.”

Schwarzenbart showcased her work in a public display in the Studio Arts building at UWGB in October. She plans to launch an art-specific web page in the future. She hopes to continue using her talent both as a hobby, and in a professional field.

“I hope to use my creativity in marketing and advertising to help design and sell products. In my free time I would still be able to make and sell art as a hobby.”

Also receiving honors at the Region V ACUI:
Logan Sprangers — First place in the Multipage Publication Design Category for the Spring 2014 Good Time Programming Booklet and second place in the Poster Category for his promotion of the speaker and presenter Anita Sarkeesian
Ranita Haanen — Second place in Brochure Design for the Great Beginnings (GB) Week foldable brochure
Kimmy Schwarzenbart — First place in the Large Media design Category and “Best of Show” for the entire Graphics Contest for Region V.


HOOAH! Student rallies campus, community for vets

Nicholas Gries, a nontraditional student at UW-Green Bay, has had many experiences in his life that have made him the man he is today. But it is his military experience that drives his current passion to dive further, dig deeper — both at the University, and in service to his community.

“The number one thing that the military has taught me is not to be content with my situation; you can always do more…” says Gries, a business and finance major. “The military has also taught me to set my goals high and work hard until the mission is complete. We do not fail. We make mistakes, learn from them, and get back up and try again.”

Gries served as a fire team leader in in the 1st Ranger Battalion of the United States Army from 2002 until 2006. In 2010 he joined the Wisconsin Army National Guard as a squad leader. In 2012, he joined the National Guard full time, in the Active Guard Reserve (AGR) as a non-commissioned officer, a position he maintains today.

Gries was one of the two founders of 4th HOOAH WI (Helping out our American Heroes), a local branch of a national organization dedicated to supporting deployed service men and women, their stateside families and returning veterans. Gries has also helped establish a scholarship at UW-Green Bay for continuing service men and women, or veterans of the armed forces.

“I am president of 4th HOOAH WI, and we look at any and every way possible to help Veterans and their families,” he says. “I am a firm believer in higher education for everyone so this is one way we can help veterans and their families reach the goals they set out for themselves.”

This year, Veterans Day (Wednesday, Nov. 11) will be a little more hectic for Gries, who is an organizer of HOOAH WI’s major fundraising effort of the year —the third annual Veteran Suicide Rucksack March — a 22-mile walk/run/march beginning at Stadium View Bar and Grille, 1963 Holmgren Way. At 4 p.m. that day, HOOAH WI will be recognized, with other veterans’ scholarship donors, at UW-Green Bay’s annual Veterans Reception at 4 p.m. in the University Union.

(The expression “hooah,” incidentally, has no precise dictionary definition, but is instantaneously recognizable to service members and veterans (mostly Army) as military slang — a confident, catch-all expression of high morale, cohesiveness and motivation.)

Gries, a Bay Port High School graduate, said he was initially drawn to UW-Green Bay because of its sound business program and the school’s location, but he has been impressed after the fact that the campus provides the non-traditional student an ideal opportunity for degree completion.

“I am not a traditional student…The thing I like the best about the campus and school is the times of the classes, allowing me to make it to my full time job…All of my instructors have been more than understanding…I believe nontraditional students are more than welcomed and treated as peers.”

For more information about the Third Annual Veteran Suicide Rucksack March.

Story by student Emily Schuh, editorial intern, Marketing and University Communication Office

Wanek is student of the week

If it’s another week, it’s another Phoenix of the Week as identified by the Student Government Association. This week, it’s senior business major Sarah Wanek, who is described as well-known on campus “for her upbeat personality, hard work and dedication,” and work as co-director for the Student Ambassadors Program.

UW-Green Bay initiative brings used books to inmates

Bookdrive-for-inmates-webIn her three full years as a UW-Green Bay student, Courtney Maye has surrounded herself with extraordinary student organizations, community partners, and passionate faculty and staff, striving to better the quality of life for underrepresented groups of people in the Green Bay community and beyond.

Maye took it upon herself to extend these efforts to the incarcerated population — giving them an opportunity to stay connected through books and ideas. She is the coordinator behind a “Books for Inmates” drive currently being held on campus.

Her idea was inspired this past summer, as she began to read a philosophy textbook from a class she took her freshman year.

“I started to think about how long these books sit on my shelves long after I finish them, and how much I’ve taken every single page for granted as a college student, a healthy person, a young person, and a free person.

“Through books we can give the gifts of insight, personal growth, self-sufficiency and both self-reflection and reflection of the world around us,” she said. “Through books we have been blessed to be the beneficiaries of some of the best stories and ideas in our world. What a privilege it is to be able to pass that on to every single person that we can, incarcerated or not.”

The types of books she recommends for the Brown County Jail connection:
New or like new “life skill” books such as personal finance, job skills, etc., science fiction/fantasy, mystery, suspense, westerns, Spanish language books, technical and vocational skills, GED test prep books, basic high school level math and science textbooks, African-American studies, or criminal and civil rights books.
To publicize the effort, Maye has been working closely with the UWGB Social Work Club, which has helped in creating more drop box locations for the donated books. Maye also engaged the support of Prof. Derek Jefferys, Associate Professor of Humanistic Studies and Religion, who spoke about his passion for working with the incarcerated during his 50th Anniversary “Last Lecture” presentation.

The Book Drive for Inmates drop box is currently located in Rose Hall 305. There will be more drop boxes located around campus from early November to the end of the fall semester. Contact Courtney Maye with questions or if you wish to donate a large quantity of books.
Story and photo by Marketing and University Communication intern Emily Schuh

Squad call Wednesday was for diabetic issue

Employees leaving campus after 4:30 p.m. Wednesday might have seen emergency response units on South Circle Drive in the vicinity of the Arboretum trails near the Facilities Management Building. We’ve learned the crews were responding to a call of a student reporting health issues while walking the exterior wood-chip trail closest to Highway 54/57. The woman had suffered an apparent diabetic reaction; other students stayed with her or moved to the Circle Drive roadway to guide first responders in her direction. UW-Green Bay Police assisted by providing a smaller, lighter mini-truck (instead of the heavy rescue squad) to navigate the chipped trails. Initially unable to walk, the student responded favorably to medical treatment by paramedics.


UW-Green Bay Theatre presents ‘Theophilus North’

University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Theatre and Dance presents the comedic drama Theophilus North, a Jazz Age tale based on a semi-autobiographical story by Thornton Wilder, as its first production of the 2015-16 season.

The performances of Theophilus North will take place Thursday through Saturday, Oct. 15-17, and Wednesday through Saturday, Oct. 21-24 at 7:30 p.m. each evening in the Jean Weidner Theatre at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts on campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive. General admission prices at the door are $20 for the general public and $17 for seniors and students (discounted to $18 and $15 if purchased in advance). Tickets for currently enrolled UW-Green Bay students are $10.

Set in 1926, the play follows 30-year-old Theophilus North, who quits his teaching position in New Jersey and embarks on a quest for fun, adventure and his place in the world. When his used car breaks down, leaving him stranded in Newport, Rhode Island, Theophilus takes on odd jobs in houses of the wealthy.

The title role in the student production will be played by junior Evan Ash, a double major at UW-Green Bay and the recipient of the Irene A. Shewalter Memorial Scholarship for Theatre.

When asked about the role, Ash said, “I identify most with Theophilus, and I instantly fell in love with the journey he and the rest of the characters take during the show…The part I enjoy most about playing Theophilus is being able to project his aura of kindness and good-hearted nature and his willingness to help anyone.”

Theophilus North is written by Matthew Burnett based upon the semi-autobiographical final work of Wilder, the Pulitzer Prize-winning icon of American literature. The production is directed by Associate Prof. John Mariano.

For more information about this event, call 920-465-2944 or visit the Weidner Center website.



Reception honors student artist Adam Fulwiler

UW-Green Bay student artist Adam Fulwiler was honored for his work, “Windows” a layered, large-scale acrylic painting chosen for display as the Chancellor’s Holiday Art Scholarship selection for 2015-16. Fulwiler was joined by art faculty and others at a reception hosted by Chancellor Gary L. and Georgia Nix Miller, Sept. 24.

Fulwiler, a graduate of West De Pere High School, has a double major in Art and Design Arts and expects to graduate in spring 2017. His painting was selected by Chancellor and Mrs. Miller from a range of student pieces submitted for juried consideration. Fulwiler will receive a monetary award provided through the Holiday Art Scholarship program established by the Millers.

With its selection, “Windows” will be the featured art on the 2015 year-end holiday cards the Millers and the privately funded UW-Green Bay Foundation Inc. will share with campus and community friends of the University. Additionally, the piece will be publicly displayed for one year in the UW-Green Bay Chancellor’s Office, Suite 810 of the David A. Cofrin Library.

Art Prof. Kristy Deetz says Fulwiler “is a diligent worker who sets a standard of excellence in the quality of the work that he produces and in his commitment to growing as an artist.”

In his artist’s statement accompanying “Windows,” Fulwiler describes how his large-scale paintings explore the elements of form including line, shape, value, color and texture. “I build up surfaces by scraping, layering and dragging paint across the entire canvas with the goal of forming visual passages and ‘doorways’ to spaces that often suggest landscapes,” he writes. He uses five-foot-long squeegees, brooms, metal trowels and oversize brushes to create the paintings.

(Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)

Photos by Tammy Resulta