Tag: presentation

Faculty note: Gurung in Ontario for ‘Education/Cognition’ symposium

Pscyhology Prof. Regan A.R. Gurung of Human Development was scheduled to be in Hamilton, Ontario today (Thursday, Aug. 13) for McMaster University’s “Symposium on Education and Cognition.” He is to be this evening’s featured speaker in a presentation titled “And the twain will meet: Combining cognitive science, teaching and learning,” to be followed by a panel discussion.

‘Breaking Up With Sugar’ is July 9 Lunch n’ Learn

If you have ever struggled with sugar cravings, this Lunch n’ Learn is for you! Next Thursday (July 9), between 12:15 and 1 p.m. in the 1965 Room, guest presenter Celeste Faye (daughter of UWGB’s own Linda Parins) will examine the six motivators responsible for sugar cravings. She’ll also advise on how to go beyond diets, detoxes and exercise regimes to understand how you can get control over your sugar cravings, and she’ll also address whether sugar in moderation can still be part of a healthy lifestyle. (She’ll bring a delicious sugar-reduced dessert for sampling.) Feel free to bring your lunch. To register, go to http://uwgreenbay.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_4IKiqW6sdkvB4rP. Read more on the program and presenter.

Sherman presents with Viking specialists worldwide

Heidi Sherman presented the paper, “Staraia Ladoga and the Emporia Theses: The Anatomy of a ‘Non-Place’ in Viking-Age Russia,” at Yeast for Changes: Vikings and their Impact on Medieval Europe, May 21. The conference, which brought together Viking specialists from more than a dozen European countries was sponsored by The Institute of Archaeology, Wrocław, Poland.

Profs. Currier and Luczaj and students take research on the road

UWGB Professors Ryan Currier and John Luczaj of Natural and Applied Sciences along with 12 students attended the North Central Section of the Geological Society of America meeting in Madison at the end of May. Summaries of the presentations are linked, below. Three of the students presented posters related to their own classwork with Prof. Currier:

Undergraduate Student (Geoscience Major) Zach Ashauer: “The Lashly Mountains of Southern Victorialand, Antarctica: Investigating a Possible Ancient Volcano.”
https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2015NC/webprogram/Paper255474.html (independent research).

Graduate Student (ES&P Program) Sarah Faga: “Using GIS to Uncover the Link Between Radon Potential and Geology in Wisconsin.”
https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2015NC/webprogram/Paper256015.html (master’s thesis).

Graduate Student (ES&P Program) Brian Yagle: “Experiments on the Evolution of Laccolith Morphology: The Maturation from Elliptical to Circular Shaped Intrusions.”
https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2015NC/webprogram/Paper255751.html (Capstone in Environmental Science Course). Most of the data for the poster were collected by students as part of a student-based research project in the class. Coauthors were Dr. Patrick Forsythe (the lead instructor for the course) and Yagle.

In addition, Prof. Luczaj, who serves as UWGB’s Geoscience Chair, gave an oral presentation, “Modern Aquifer Chemistry as a Function of Water-Rock Interaction: A Case Example from Eastern Wisconsin.”
https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2015NC/webprogram/Paper255840.html

UW-Green Bay grad students will describe Cat Island research


The keynote presentation at Tuesday’s watershed symposium will take place from 9:15 to 10 a.m. in the Union’s Phoenix Room. Chelsea Gunther, Jesse Weinzinger and Tom Prestby — graduate students in Environmental Science and Policy — will describe their research work involving the restoration of the Cat Island Chain in the lower bay. Following completion of protective islands and dikes intended to support better wetland and shallow-water habitat, Gunther and Weinzinger are finding evidence of increased aquatic plant diversity, and Prestby is documenting the return of migratory shorebird populations.

Brief: Stoll presents at Midwest Economics Association annual meeting

Professor John Stoll of Public and Environmental Affairs attended the Midwest Economics Association annual meeting in Minneapolis, recently where he served as a moderator for a session entitled, “Environmental Economics.” He also served as commentator in an another session, “Income Inequality and Air Pollution: A County-Level Analysis,” and reported on a third topic, “Impact of Communication upon the Selection of Environmental Targets, Policy Implementation, and Political Acceptability,” a continuing collaboration with Matthew Winden of UW-Whitewater and Arrington Stoll of UW-Milwaukee.

Fermanich a featured presenter at Great Lakes water conference

Water quality and runoff expert Kevin Fermanich, professor of Natural and Applied Sciences, will co-present with Prof. Val Klump of UW-Milwaukee later this week at a major regional conference on the Great Lakes. Their topic is “Lake Michigan’s Green Bay: Why the Dead Zone? What is Needed to Prevent it?” Fermanich has been a key contributor to watershed runoff studies in the Green Bay area, examining phosphorous loading and the resulting low-oxygen conditions that yield so-called “dead zones.” Other case studies will look at Lake Huron’s Saginaw Bay and Toledo’s Lake Erie drinking water problems, among other topics. The conference is the second Great Lakes Science-Policy Confluence Conference presented by The Environmental Law & Policy Center in collaboration with Loyola University and Northwestern University’s Institute for Sustainability and Energy.

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He’s also a panelist at Green Bay ‘Phosphorus Summit’ — U.S. Rep. Reid Ribble and DNR Secretary Cathy Stepp are convening a “Phosphorus Summit” to take place from 7:30 to 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, April 1, at the Neville Public Museum in downtown Green Bay. UW-Green Bay Prof. Kevin Fermanich is an invited panelist on the topic of curbing nonpoint pollution. Also taking part will be dairy industry and turfgrass representatives, agency water quality specialists and a representative of NEW Water.

Faculty note: Goff book, presentations

Victoria Goff, associate professor emerita (ICS), is writing a book on the impact of social media on authors and the U.S. book publishing industry. She recently shared some of her findings at Left Coast Crime, an annual conference of mystery writers that attracts best-selling authors and fans from all over the country. On March 12, she participated on a panel, “Social Media: What Every Author Needs to Know,” and March 14, she was the moderator of another panel, “Self-Publishing, Traditional & Hybrid: Publishing Options.”