Tag: PDC

Snapshots: Arrival of 16 educators from Nigeria

The Institute for Learning Partnership is showcasing the power of international collaboration this week, welcoming 16 Nigerian educators who are part of its newest professional development cohort. The educators come from the preschool, elementary, middle and high school levels, and are classroom teachers, school leaders and owners and counselors from private, parochial and government schools. They are beginning the Accomplished Educator Professional Development Certificate (PDC) program, which has been customized as a joint partnership between UW-Green Bay and the Quality Assurance and Research Development Agency of Nigeria. See snapshots and details.
 

Power of partnership: UW-Green Bay welcomes educators from Nigeria

learning partnership-international collaborationThe Institute for Learning Partnership is showcasing the power of international collaboration this week, welcoming 16 Nigerian educators who are part of its newest professional development cohort.

The educators come from the preschool, elementary, middle and high school levels, and are classroom teachers, school leaders and owners, and counselors from private, parochial and government schools. They are beginning the Accomplished Educator Professional Development Certificate (PDC) program, which has been developed as a joint partnership between UW-Green Bay and the Quality Assurance and Research Development Agency of Nigeria (QAARDAN).

Pictured above, from left to right, are UW-Green Bay representative Kimberly Desotell, Coordinator, Professional Development Certificate Program; Juliet Cole, Associate Director, Institute for Learning Partnership; and Theresa Okafor, Director of QAARDAN, the partner organization from Nigeria.

The educators have a packed itinerary during the week, when they will engage in numerous sessions and on- and off-campus events scheduled to cover and address a variety of subjects. They will learn about and discuss topics including online research, professional development best practices, identifying issues at school, developing individual learning plans and more. Splitting time between UW-Green Bay and various area K-12 schools, the educators will be able to observe firsthand many of the issues and topics that make up their sessions and related discussions.

UW-Green Bay also welcomed a group of Nigerian educators in 2013, when nine individuals spent a week engaged in learning and cultural exchange. Individuals from both UW-Green Bay and QAARDAN lauded the program and its mutual benefits.

UWGB welcomes educators from Nigeria

More information about the Professional Development Certificate partnership with QAARDAN is available online. Visit the Institute for Learning Partnership homepage to learn more about the institute and its initiatives.

Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.
 Institute for Learning Partnership welcomes Nigerian educators to campus, Spring 2014 Institute for Learning Partnership welcomes Nigerian educators to campus, Spring 2014 Institute for Learning Partnership welcomes Nigerian educators to campus, Spring 2014 Institute for Learning Partnership welcomes Nigerian educators to campus, Spring 2014 Institute for Learning Partnership welcomes Nigerian educators to campus, Spring 2014 Institute for Learning Partnership welcomes Nigerian educators to campus, Spring 2014 Institute for Learning Partnership welcomes Nigerian educators to campus, Spring 2014 Institute for Learning Partnership welcomes Nigerian educators to campus, Spring 2014 Institute for Learning Partnership welcomes Nigerian educators to campus, Spring 2014 Institute for Learning Partnership welcomes Nigerian educators to campus, Spring 2014 Institute for Learning Partnership welcomes Nigerian educators to campus, Spring 2014 Institute for Learning Partnership welcomes Nigerian educators to campus, Spring 2014

Nigerian educators among those visiting campus

Here’s a story showcasing the power of international collaboration in education. UW-Green Bay’s Institute for Learning Partnership and Professional Program in Education will be welcoming a sizeable contingent of visiting educators from Nigeria next week (Monday, March 31 through Friday, April 4). About 20 teachers and administrators will be here for five days of learning and cultural exchange. Their visit will be focused on professional development, with numerous sessions and on-and off-campus events scheduled to cover and address a variety of subjects. We’ll have updates and coverage in a future issue.

It will be a busy week for international visitors to UW-Green Bay.

Mohamed Abla, a contemporary artist and activist from Egypt, will be on campus, sponsored by the International Visiting Scholars Program. You can view a portion of his itinerary here.

In addition,  major novelist César Gutiérrez of Arequipa, Peru, whose debut novel 80M84RD3R0 is a work hailed by critics, will be visiting classes and making several public presentations. Assistant Prof. Hernan Fernandez-Meardi of the Spanish program is finalizing details of the visit.

Area educators earn Professional Development Certificates

Our own Institute for Learning Partnership presented 26 area educators with Professional Development Certificates during a recognition ceremony Oct. 1, acknowledging their completion of this unique, self-paced and individualized professional development program. Green Bay School District Superintendent Michelle Langenfeld addressed the program grads, the majority of whom are teachers in the Green Bay District. Others completing the program work in the Pulaski and Manitowoc School Districts. For more information on the PDC program and a complete list of its most recent grads, check out our news release.

Area educators earn Professional Development Certificates

The Institute for Learning Partnership at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay has awarded Professional Development Certificates to 26 educators from three area school districts.

The “Accomplished Educators” were certified during a special recognition ceremony Oct. 1 at the UW-Green Bay University Union. Michelle Langenfeld, superintendent of the Green Bay Area Public School District, gave the keynote address to the graduates and discussed how important it is for teachers to continue to learn and to be passionate about what they do in the classroom every day.

“These accomplished educators have demonstrated improved teaching quality and are contributing leadership in their respective schools,” said PDC Coordinator Kim Desotell. “The most important outcome for these educators is they are better prepared to improve student achievement in their classrooms as result of their PDC research and reflection.  We are proud of these educators and their work.”

The PDC is a unique, self-paced and individualized professional development program. The focus of the experience is based on student learning as well as professional growth for educators. The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction recognizes the PDC for 5-year re-licensure of educators in Wisconsin.

The 26 educators recognized for PDC completion are:
Melissa Hanmann, Sunnyside Elementary, Pulaski
Sandra Krupski, Sullivan Elementary, Green Bay Area Public School District
Erin Noble, Pulaski Middle School, Pulaski
Deanna Kehler, Doty Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Amanda Boerst, Doty Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Lindsay Ferry, John Dewey Academy of Learning, Green Bay Area Public School District
Teri Williams, Franklin Elementary School, Manitowoc
Janet Peterson, Doty Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Sue Wieland, Lincoln Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Jeremy Anderson, Preble High School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Amy Barta, Eisenhower Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Kristin Anderson-Vorpahl, Sullivan Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Ashley Braun, Nicolet Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Pam Super, Red Smith School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Jennifer Good, Martin Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Mary Ann Hitch, Franklin Middle School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Tyson Tatro, Danz Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Crystal Trejo, Eisenhower Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Michelle La Plante, Doty Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Carla Nguyen, Martin Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Michelle Cayemberg, Webster Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Alyssa Brown, Doty Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Joan Huntoon, Kennedy Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Stacy Brodjeski, Red Smith Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Anne Priyadarshane, Danz Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Tammy Van Ess, Fort Howard Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District

#13-160

Alumni Rising: Institute’s Cole honored by native Nigeria

Juliet Cole receives educational award of honor in NigeriaOn a recent trip to her homeland of Nigeria, Juliet Cole, associate director of the Institute for Learning Partnership, was presented with the “Recognition Award of Outstanding Daughter of the Soil” educational honor.

The award, given by the Supreme House Montessori School in Lagos, Nigeria, was presented to Cole in partnership with the Quality Assurance and Research Development Agency (QAARDAN) of Nigeria. The recognition spoke to appreciation for a “job well done for the immense contributions to the enormous growth of education in Nigeria.”

In her role as an ambassador of UW-Green Bay, Cole used the trip to strengthen the relationship between the University and educational entities in Nigeria, and promote UW-Green Bay’s Accomplished Educator Professional Development Certificate (PDC) Program.

Her travels also included a presentation at the Lagos State Government Ministry of Education International Educational Summit, held on May 22. This presentation promoted the PDC to educators as an effective and innovative program for promoting quality assurance in teaching and learning.

Juliet Cole, Recognition Award of Outstanding Daughter of the Soil

“I was pleasantly surprised and honored to receive this award,” said Cole. “Promoting the Institute’s PDC program was easy for me given that I’ve been immersed in the behind-the-scenes aspects of the program from its inception. It is a proven and innovative program that transforms educators into reflective practitioners who understand the art and science of teaching and know how to perform classroom action research. I wanted this for Nigerian educators to successfully prepare students for a competitive world.”

In May of 2013, prior to Cole’s trip, nine Nigerian educators and administrators visited UW-Green Bay and local schools to exchange teaching practices and explore school/University partnerships. As part of the weeklong itinerary, the Nigerian educators were invited to visit Green Bay West High School, the Wisconsin International School in De Pere, Red Smith and Heritage Elementary schools, Providence Academy, the Howard-Suamico School District and St. Norbert College.

Theresa Okafor is Director of QAARDAN, which trains teachers and encourages professional development through workshops and tours of schools located in the United Kingdom, France, Canada and the U.S. Okafor said the relationship between UW-Green Bay and QAARDAN will provide Nigerian schools with better teachers and, ultimately, better students.

“We’re open to learn from the expertise we’ve witnessed,” Okafor said. “We’ve seen the teachers and faculty are very resourceful and experienced, everything they have had to share is research-based, evidence-based teaching strategies.”

Read more about the visit by Nigerian educators to UW-Green Bay and local schools.

Cole is a bachelor’s (1975) and master’s degree (1980) graduate of UW-Green Bay.

Professional exchange: Nigerian educators visit UW-Green Bay

Nigerian Educators Visit UW-Green Bay, May 2013How far would you travel to become a better professional? 100 miles? Maybe 1,000 miles? A group of nine educators arrived in Green Bay April 28 after traveling nearly 6,000 miles from Nigeria in Western Africa to attend a series of seminars throughout the week. Group members came to UW-Green Bay to expand their understanding of educational practices utilized by teachers and professors in the U.S.

The UW-Green Bay Institute for Learning Partnership and Professional Program in Education are the organizations that invited the Nigerian educators to Wisconsin. Providing educational training to the Nigerian educators not only fosters international collaboration but also allows UW-Green Bay students and faculty an opportunity to learn about Nigerian culture. Timothy Kaufman, Institute for Learning Partnership director, was excited to demonstrate the University’s tradition of educational excellence.

“We’re really excited to gain this opportunity to exchange teaching practices with our Nigerian friends,” Kaufman said. “Showing off all the great partnerships we have with area schools is also exciting for us.”

Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.

Photo: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGBPhoto: Nigerian Educators Visit UWGB

As part of the weeklong itinerary, the Nigerian educators were invited to visit Green Bay West High School, the Wisconsin International School in De Pere, a local Montessori School or the Howard-Suamico School District on Wednesday. The educators also spent time at St. Norbert College in De Pere.

Theresa Okafor is Director of QAARDAN, a Nigerian-based organization that trains teachers and encourages professional development through workshops and tours of schools located in the United Kingdom, France, Canada and the U.S. Okafor said the relationship between UW-Green Bay and QAARDAN (which stands for Quality Assurance and Research Development Agency) will provide Nigerian schools with better teachers and, ultimately, better students.

“We’re open to learn from the expertise we’ve witnessed,” Okafor said. “We’ve seen the teachers and faculty are very resourceful and experienced, everything they have had to share is research-based, evidence-based teaching strategies.”

Most events throughout the week were dedicated to professional development, but Tuesday’s (April 30) welcome reception at UW-Green Bay’s Weidner Center for the Performing Arts gave UW-Green Bay leaders an opportunity to extend thanks and appreciation to the Nigerian educators for their visit. It also gave the Nigerians an opportunity to share their cultural traditions through song and dance. To honor the travelers from Nigeria, several University dignitaries attended the gathering, including Chancellor Tom Harden.

“I’m happy to hear how much you’ve already learned, but what we’re really proud of is our teaching and the learning our students do,” Harden said. “I know you have learned some things since you arrived, but I also believe you have taught us quite a bit as well, and we need to continue learning about your culture, your arts, so we can continue to foster this friendship and an effective partnership.”

Junior Education major Liz Simon was asked to emcee portions of Tuesday’s reception. Simon’s parents emigrated to the U.S. from Nigeria in 1981 and, as a soon-to-be educator, she was thrilled to meet the distinguished guests.

“I’ve heard so many stories from my parents about Nigeria, particularly the struggles involved when they emigrated from Nigeria,” Simon said. “Now to see educators from Nigeria come here to learn from us and us from them, fills me with pride.”

Understanding the American education system and becoming acquainted with strong practices in teaching and learning is the goal for the Nigerian educators. Kimberly Desotell, professional development coordinator with the Institute for Learning Partnership, said the visit would have a ripple effect for students and educators back in Nigeria.

“A lot of the experiences this week will help them better understand what are good teaching strategies and how to effectively teach their colleagues these strategies,” Desotell said. “They’re eager to learn and improve their craft in these areas so as to improve teaching and learning at their schools in Nigeria.”

When the Nigerian educators boarded their flight to traverse the 6,000 miles home, organizers said they would better equipped to teach their students — and the UW-Green Bay community would be looking forward to the next opportunity to exchange ideas with friends from across the globe. As Tuesday’s reception came to a close, Okafor noted how cultural collaboration and emphasizing similarities was an important aspect of the week’s visit.

“Learning is not just about transmission of knowledge, but is also about enriching relationships with students,” Okafor said. “We’ve noticed a lot of warmth from the people here, we have many commonalities. This is one of them.”

Story by James Taylor, University Communication intern

Photos by Mike Hoeft, Institute for Learning Partnership

Schaal to retire as director of Institute for Learning 


Veteran educator Richard Schaal has announced he will resign as director of the Institute for Learning Partnership at UW-Green Bay effective May 31. Schaal first joined the Institute in 2003 as coordinator of the Professional Development Certificate program. He accepted appointment as director in 2007, succeeding John Crubaugh. The Institute brings together educators from area K-12 school districts, universities and colleges, along with business and community leaders, to improve learning for all students in pre-kindergarten through grade 16. Prior to joining UW-Green Bay, Schaal was a staff development trainer for the Green Bay Area Public Schools and a principal at Fort Howard, Red Smith and Baird schools.

Fifteen educators will receive PDC recognition 

The Institute for Learning Partnership at UW-Green Bay will award Professional Development Certificates to 15 educators from three area school districts Sept. 27. The “Accomplished Educators” will be certified during a special recognition ceremony at 6:30 p.m. in the 1965 Room of the University Union. Pulaski Superintendent Mel Lightner will be the keynote speaker, and Prof. Steve Kimball of the Education will also address the graduates. The PDC program is a self-paced, individualized professional development program recognized by the state DPI for 5-year re-licensure of educators in the state. For more info, including a full list of PDC grads, see the news release.

UW-Green Bay to honor 15 Professional Development Certificate graduates

The Institute for Learning Partnership at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay will award Professional Development Certificates to 15 educators from three area school districts Sept. 27.

The “Accomplished Educators” will be certified during a special recognition ceremony at 6:30 p.m. in the 1965 Room of the University Union at UW-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Drive. Pulaski Community School District Superintendent Mel Lightner will be the keynote speaker, and Associate Prof. Steve Kimball of the UW-Green Bay Professional Program in Education will provide closing remarks.

“One of the highlights of the PDC presentation ceremony occurs when the graduates share their thoughts about this significant milestone in their PDC journey and how the process has improve their effectiveness as an educator,” said PDC Coordinator Kim Desotell. “Inevitably it is a personal and professional accomplishment and their reflections often inspire the entire audience.”

The PDC is a unique, self-paced and individualized professional development program. The focus of the experience is based on student learning as well as professional growth for educators. The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction recognizes the PDC for 5-year re-licensure of educators in Wisconsin.

The 15 educators recognized for PDC completion are:
Elizabeth Armstrong, third grade bilingual teacher, Eisenhower Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Jennifer Brooks, counselor, Danz Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Shannon Goerke, third grade bilingual teacher, Eisenhower Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Kari Morrow, school psychologist, Lombardi Middle School, Kennedy and Annie Jackson elementary schools, Green Bay Area Public School District
Rachael Poppe, special education teacher, East High School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Lindsay Seiler, fourth grade bilingual one-way teacher, Danz Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Katherine Schiller, fourth grade teacher, Danz Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
-Vikki Van Egeren, English as a Second Language teacher, Eisenhower Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Melissa Swan Van Straten, bilingual instructional coach, Fort Howard Elementary School, Green Bay Area Public School District
Sharon Ellner, special education teacher, Lannoye Elementary School, Pulaski Community Schools
Nicole Gerth, counselor, Pulaski Community Middle School, Pulaski Community Schools
Kristine Kuhn, counselor, Pulaski Community Middle School, Pulaski Community Schools
Jolene McMahon, Title 1/Literacy Support, LB Clarke Middle School, Two Rivers Public School District
James Milske, Two Rivers, guidance counselor, Koenig Elementary School, Two Rivers Public School District
Tanya Shillcox, first grade teacher, Koenig Elementary School, Two Rivers Public Schools

The Institute for Learning Partnership was founded in 1997-98 to focus on educational excellence with special attention to the PK-16 learner. The Institute brings together the resources of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, Green Bay Area Public School District and Northeastern Wisconsin’s school districts, businesses and community leadership. Its PDC program was the first to be endorsed by the Professional Development Academy of the Wisconsin Education Association.

Eight Northeastern Wisconsin school districts currently offer recognition and compensation for the PDC. These districts are Green Bay, De Pere, Sheboygan, Pulaski, Manitowoc, Two Rivers, West De Pere and Kiel. With the completion of this newest class of PDC recipients, there are now more than 230 Accomplished Educators in these eight districts.

For more information about the Professional Development Certification program contact the Institute for Learning Partnership at (920) 465-5555; or learnpart@uwgb.edu.

#11-129