Tag: natural and applied sciences

Seven earn promotion to full professor


The UW System Regents also approved moving the following individuals from associate professor to the senior rank of full professor:

Lucy Arendt, Business Administration
Mathew Dornbush, Natural and Applied Sciences
Susan Gallagher-Lepak, Nursing
Catherine Henze, Humanistic Studies
John Luczaj, Natural and Applied Sciences
Bryan Vescio, Humanistic Studies
Amy Wolf, Natural and Applied Sciences.

Our news release includes a short bio on each of this year’s faculty members advancing to full-professor status.

Miller appointment in NAS


In approving the statewide slate of faculty promotions, the UW System Board of Regents took action Friday to ratify the concurrent appointment of Gary L. Miller — who joined UW-Green Bay as chancellor last Aug. 1 — as a full professor with tenure in the Natural and Applied Sciences academic unit. Miller was a professor of ecology with the University of Mississippi prior to entering academic administration on a full-time basis.

Profs. Currier and Luczaj and students take research on the road

UWGB Professors Ryan Currier and John Luczaj of Natural and Applied Sciences along with 12 students attended the North Central Section of the Geological Society of America meeting in Madison at the end of May. Summaries of the presentations are linked, below. Three of the students presented posters related to their own classwork with Prof. Currier:

Undergraduate Student (Geoscience Major) Zach Ashauer: “The Lashly Mountains of Southern Victorialand, Antarctica: Investigating a Possible Ancient Volcano.”
https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2015NC/webprogram/Paper255474.html (independent research).

Graduate Student (ES&P Program) Sarah Faga: “Using GIS to Uncover the Link Between Radon Potential and Geology in Wisconsin.”
https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2015NC/webprogram/Paper256015.html (master’s thesis).

Graduate Student (ES&P Program) Brian Yagle: “Experiments on the Evolution of Laccolith Morphology: The Maturation from Elliptical to Circular Shaped Intrusions.”
https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2015NC/webprogram/Paper255751.html (Capstone in Environmental Science Course). Most of the data for the poster were collected by students as part of a student-based research project in the class. Coauthors were Dr. Patrick Forsythe (the lead instructor for the course) and Yagle.

In addition, Prof. Luczaj, who serves as UWGB’s Geoscience Chair, gave an oral presentation, “Modern Aquifer Chemistry as a Function of Water-Rock Interaction: A Case Example from Eastern Wisconsin.”
https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2015NC/webprogram/Paper255840.html

UW-Green Bay 50th Anniversary will feature faculty lecture series

The lineup is set for the UW-Green Bay 50th Anniversary “Last Lecture Series” for the 2015-16 academic year. Each presentation is a Wednesday event beginning at 7 p.m. in the Union’s Christie Theatre.

The lineup of distinguished faculty lecturers:
Sept. 23 — Derek Jeffreys, Professor, Humanistic Studies, “The Mystery of the Person: Teaching Philosophy and Religion in a Maximum-Security Prison”
Oct. 21 — Jeff Entwistle, Professor, Theatre and Dance, “We All Need Theatre in Our Lives and in Our Future”
Nov. 18 — Susan Gallagher-Lepak, Associate Professor, Nursing, “E-Learning: The Train has Left the Station”
Feb. 17 — Lucy Arendt, Associate Dean, College of Professional Studies, “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values”
March 23 — Steve Meyer, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences, “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s”
April 13 — Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science, “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit”

ABC, NPR call on Draney to explain ‘spider rain’

A small Australian town was hit with a rain of falling spiders and their silk that practically piled up in drifts, and ABC News online wanted to explain the phenomenon to its readers and viewers. They talked to two American arachnologists, including Prof. Michael Draney of the Natural and Applied Sciences program at UW-Green Bay. It seems the floating webs are a dispersal technique (called “ballooning”) and the prevailing air currents and a bumper hatch combined to make little Goulburn, Australia spider central. See story.

***     ***     ***     ***     ***

Next up: NPR’s ‘All Things Considered’ – Draney also fielded a call from National Public Radio and “All Things Considered.” He taped a short interview for a spot expected to air Wednesday (May 20) during the afternoon ATC news show.

Healing habitats: Grant to build comprehensive plan for fish, wildlife

wolf-howe-top-storyMore than a dozen undergraduate and graduate students have a tremendous opportunity to work alongside UW-Green Bay Professors Bob Howe and Amy Wolf on a comprehensive plan to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the region.

Howe, Wolf and UWGB staff, in collaboration with The Nature Conservancy (TNC), are the recipients of a $471,000 Environmental Protection Agency/Department of Natural Resources grant to study fish and wildlife conditions and threats in what is termed the “Lower Green Bay and Fox River Area of Concern” and its immediately contributing watershed.

“This project is important for our region because it will yield one of the most, if not the most, specific plans for improving fish and wildlife habitat in the lower Bay and Fox River,” said Howe.

Howe considers the assessment, and the recommendations vital to the future regional economy and quality of life.

“Although the AOC is clearly degraded, more and more evidence has shown that this is a ‘world class’ site for freshwater fish, colonial and migratory birds, and other wildlife species,” said Howe. “I view Green Bay as comparable to Chesapeake Bay on the East Coast and San Francisco Bay on the West Coast — places where natural resources have experienced degradation, but places where these resources are still very much alive and are vital to the future local economy and quality of life,” he said.

Lower Green Bay and the Fox River below the DePere Dam comprise one of 43 Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOC’s) designated in 1987 by the International Joint Commission of Canada and the United States through the U.S.-Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The ultimate goal of the UWGB/TNC project is to help develop a strategy for improving conditions in the AOC so that it can be removed or “de-listed” from its impaired status.

Loss of fish and wildlife habitat is one of the most significant reasons why the Lower Green Bay and Fox River AOC was designated as an AOC. Documented (WDNR) causes of ecological and economic impairment of the Lower Green Bay and Fox River AOC include:
• habitat destruction and fragmentation due to urban and industrial development and stream channelization;
• dredging and filling of aquatic habitats along the Fox River corridor;
• wetland degradation from human activity and changing water levels;
• disruption of hydrologic connectivity by road construction and other human activities;
• loss of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Duck Creek delta area of the lower Bay because of turbid water and hyper eutrophication;
• destruction of barrier islands in the Cat Island Chain by high water and storms;
• reduction in underwater plants and littoral vegetation by invasive carp;
• silt deposition and re-suspension of sediments in the Lower Bay; and
spread of invasive plant species.

Alongside UWGB staff members Erin Giese, Michael Stiefvater, Kimberlee McKeefry, and Bobbie Webster, Howe and Wolf are working with students on this two-year, two-phase project to comprehensively assess existing habitat conditions and formulate a protection and restoration plan in the affected areas.

In each phase, UW-Green Bay students will be able to assist the faculty and staff members and Wisconsin DNR and TNC collaborators in their comprehensive research and development of the plan.

Phase One, the assessment portion of the project, will focus primarily on finding, organizing and evaluating existing data related to fish and wildlife populations in the AOC. Information will be compiled from a wide variety of sources, including local experts, on historical conditions, habitat dynamics, restoration opportunities and threats in the lower Bay and Fox River.

Phase Two goals include synthesis of the information, creating a blueprint for protection and restoration activities; identifying specific opportunities for protection, restoration and rehabilitation of fish and wildlife habitat; cataloging past projects to assess their contribution towards delisting thresholds and developing monitoring protocols for measuring the status of fish and wildlife habitat to document the success or failure of specific remediation projects.

Proposers say the project will “test the utility of objective metrics for the ultimate purpose of informing decision-makers at local, regional and national levels, particularly those making decisions involving the status, protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat in other Great Lakes Areas of Concern.”

Work began in fall of 2014 and will continue through August of 2016. This project is particularly significant because it adds to a long-standing and growing involvement of UW-Green Bay scientists and students in solving problems of water quality, ecological health, and economic viability of Green Bay and the Great Lakes in general. Other recent grants by UWGB Natural and Applied Sciences professors Kevin Fermanich, Mike Zorn, Matt Dornbush, Patrick Forsythe and others, demonstrates the important role of UWGB in helping improve environmental quality in the Green Bay ecosystem.

Faculty to present to WiSys Board; reminder on WiSys info session

Four UW-Green Bay faculty members will present at a campus luncheon hosted by the WiSys Board of Trustees on Wednesday, May 13. Sharing information about projects currently under way will be Associate Prof. Mike Zorn of Natural and Applied Science, “Smart-Phone Spectrophotometer”; Associate Prof. of NAS Heidi Fencl, “Physics Coach App”; and Associate Prof. of Nursing Susan Gallagher-Lepak and Assistant Prof. T. Heather Herdman, “Development of an Electronic Nursing Diagnosis Clinical App.”

***     ***     ***     ***     ***


Informational open house — Following the luncheon, there will be a WiSys Technology Foundation Open House from 1:30 to 3 p.m. in Suite 307 of the Environmental Sciences Building. WiSys regional associate Bob Wise, Ph.D., encourages you to stop by for conversation and to learn about funding opportunities and resources available to UW-Green Bay students, faculty and staff.  While dropping in is encouraged, an RSVP (with ASchiff@wisys.org, or at (608) 316-4037) will help with the planning.

Student-Nominated Teaching honorees are Schmitz, Katers


The Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning is pleased to announce the Spring 2015 Student Nominated Teaching Award recipients. Recipients will be presented their award at the University Leadership Award ceremony on Friday, May 15.

• Early Career Award Recipient — Sara Schmitz, Lecturer, Human Biology, director of Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics

• Experienced Teacher Award Recipient — John Katers, Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences, NAS chair, Environmental Science chair

From CATL: “Congratulations and thank you for exemplifying outstanding teaching at UW-Green Bay.”