Tag: NAS seminars

This week’s NAS Seminar: Fisheries biologist Patrick Forsythe

The next installment of the Natural and Applied Sciences Seminar Series features a timely topic — it’s the opening of Wisconsin’s inland sportfishing season this weekend — as UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Patrick Forsythe of NAS speaks on the topic, “Reproductive Ecology and Habitat Use of Primitive and Sport Fishes of Green Bay.” His slide-illustrated lecture, free and open to the public, takes place at 3 p.m. Friday (May 1) in Room 301 of the Environmental Sciences Building. Forsythe cover the great ecosystem changes of the last century and the fact fish mangers know much more than they used to but still not as much as they’d like about the vast Green Bay fishery. He’ll outline ongoing and future research plans within the UW-Green Bay Aquatic Ecology and Fisheries Laboratory, and address population characteristics, reproductive behavior, and habitat preferences of top predators including northern pike, walleye and musky and recovering native species including whitefish and sturgeon. A social follows at approximately 4 p.m. in ES 317.
 

Next NAS seminar highlights ‘Ecological Knowledge in India”


Dr. Baisakhi Bandyopadhyay, a researcher and senior fellow of the government of India, is the next speaker in the UW-Green Bay Natural and Applied Sciences Seminar series at 3 p.m. this Friday (April 17) in Room 301 of the Environmental Sciences Building. Her topic is “The Evolution of Traditional Ecological Knowledge in India: An Overview.” She’ll discuss how ecology is addressed in India’s native communities as something that encompasses several fields including sustainable forest management, biodiversity conservation by sacred groves, sacred landscape and sacred plant species, crop management, farm management, animal management and therapeutic role of Ayurveda. Some traditional ways are seen as having great relevance for sustainable resource management. The program, which is free and open to the public, will be followed by a social at approximately 4 p.m. in ES 317.

Visiting scholar from India will be in town through April 27

Dr. Baisakhi Bandyopadhyay, a senior fellow in the Ministry of Culture of the government of India, is visiting the UW-Green Bay campus during the three-week period from April 6 to April 27. Hosted by the International Visiting Scholars Program, she is scheduled to visit a number of classes here and at St. Norbert College and will also be meeting with faculty and staff to discuss common interests in environmental science and botany. Members of the campus community are invited to attend her presentation in the NAS Seminar at 3 p.m. next Friday, April 17, in ES 301. Her topic is “The Evolution of Traditional Ecological Knowledge in India – An Overview.” Anyone who would like to meet with Bandyopadhyay should contact Prof. Emeritus Robert Wenger, who is assisting with her visit.

Reminders: European jazz, play, ‘Dairy Manure’ talk, ‘Bugs!’ concert

• “The Jazz and Film Music of Krzysztof Komeda,” at 6:30 p.m. Thursday (March 5) in Fort Howard Hall of the Weidner Center

• Final weekend for UW-Green Bay Theatre comedy “Months on End

• NAS Seminar: “Dairy Manure in Wisconsin,” Friday at 3 p.m.

• ‘Bugs!’ concert by Symphonic Band, Wind Ensemble, Friday at 7:30 p.m.

National History Day competition at UW-Green Bay, Saturday

Next NAS Seminar: ‘Dairy Manure in Wisconsin’

The next installment in the Natural and Applied Sciences Seminar Series comes this Friday (March 6) at 3 p.m. in Room 301 of the Environmental Sciences Building. Troy Runge, an assistant professor of biological systems engineering with UW-Madison, will speak on the topic “Dairy Manure in Wisconsin: Environmental Bane or Energy Boon?” A post-lecture social will follow in ES 317. As always, seminars are free and open to the public.

Next NAS Seminar? We think it’s about ‘big data’… and fish


Researcher Kim Scribner of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University, will be the guest speaker next Friday, Feb. 20, at 3 p.m. in Environmental Sciences Room 301 as part of the Natural and Applied Sciences Seminar Series. The title of his talk is “Long-lived iteroparous species, ecological, demographic and genetic complexity: Acquisition, management and analytical challenges associated with big data.” More simply put: They’ve spent a long time and collected a truckload of data on the very old sturgeon living in Black Lake, Mich… and longitudinal research takes on added complexity when you’re studying sturgeon rather than, say, fruit flies. A social follows at 4 p.m.

Food security is topic of semester’s first NAS Seminar

The first Natural and Applied Sciences Seminar for spring semester will take place Friday, Feb. 6 in Environmental Sciences 301. Naresh Rimal of the School of Medical and Applied Sciences at Australia’s Central Queensland University will present “Opportunistic Blending of the Grounded Theory and System Thinking in Food Security Inquiry” at 3 p.m. His talk will be followed by a 4 p.m. social in ES 317. Hope to see you there!