Tag: Message in a Bottle

‘Message in a Bottle’ update: Recycle, reuse, reclaim … in about 40 years

We told you previously about UW-Green Bay’s “Message in a Bottle” campaign, which is bringing a fun time-capsule element to environmental awareness on campus. Sustainability leaders this fall collected messages in plastic soda and water bottles, designed to be used as fillers in new planters on the IS rooftop. The project brings awareness to the need for recycling — bottles in landfills won’t decay for a staggering 450 years — and also offered students, faculty and staff the chance to leave a message for the UW-Green Bay of tomorrow. The bottles were placed as filler in two large planters this week, and won’t be unearthed for about 40 years. We’ve got an update and cool new photos, click here.

Recycle, reuse, reclaim… in 40 years

Message-in-a-Bottle campaign

What happens when plastic bottles are used as time capsules? University officials will find out in about 40 years — when the new planters now on the IS rooftop will likely need to be reconstructed. The bottles, some with personal messages in them, were placed as filler in two large planters this week, covered with dirt and await spring planting. They provided volume and fill in the planters and make a statement — recycle! Those that end up in land fills won’t decay for a staggering 450 years! Read more here.

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Message in a Bottle, time capsule campaign, Nov. 2012Message in a Bottle, time capsule campaign, Nov. 2012Message in a Bottle, time capsule campaign, Nov. 2012Message in a Bottle, time capsule campaign, Nov. 2012

Last chance to leave message in a bottle

UW-Green Bay’s sustainability team is hoping the campus community gets — and gives — their “Message in a Bottle.” This is the final week for the personal time capsule campaign involving the new Student Services plaza/roof deck, currently under construction. The “last chance collection bin” will be located on the second floor of the Cofrin Library this week and will be well marked. Messages can be anything — campus memories, hopes for the future, a note to future generations, poems or photos. Drop off your message, and include, if you will, name, age, title, etc. as appropriate, so future University historians will know something about you. Read more.

Last chance: Leave your message in a bottle

Message in a BottleUW-Green Bay’s sustainability team is hoping the campus community gets — and gives — their “Message in a Bottle.” This is the final week for the personal time capsule campaign involving the new Student Services plaza/roof deck, currently under construction. The “last chance collection bin” will be located on the second floor of the Cofrin Library this week and will be well marked.

Here’s the history… The plaza project includes a number of large, deep planters — some are so deep that the plants going in them don’t require them all that much soil to thrive. Rather than paying more for soil, UW-Green Bay’s sustainability and facilities management teams will reuse capped plastic bottles collected from recycling bins on campus. The bottles will add the needed volume and won’t decay for a staggering 450 years or so (maybe longer) — which serves as a reminder of what happens (or more accurately, doesn’t happen) when bottles end up in the landfill, rather than the recycling bin.

In order to add an element of fun — not to mention awareness — to the project, campus community members will be able to repurpose one of their own plastic bottles as a personal time capsule, said UW-Green Bay sustainability coordinator Laurie Case.

All they need to do is rinse out a rigid plastic bottle (keeping the cap), let it dry, and then write their “message in a bottle” on a slip of paper — or express it via another medium — to be put inside.

Messages can be anything — campus memories, hopes for the future, a note to future generations, poems or photos.

Drop off your message, and include, if you will, name, age, title, etc. as appropriate, so future University historians will know something about you.

“We’re reusing bottles, avoiding costs for unneeded soil, reinforcing a plastic recycling message and leaving messages from 2012,” Case said. “Future members of the campus community will literally unearth these messages the next time the roof deck undergoes reconstruction — probably 40 or 50 years in the future.”

For more information, email sustainability@uwgb.edu.

Still time to leave your “Message in a Bottle”

Just a friendly reminder that UW-Green Bay’s earth-friendly “Message in a Bottle” campaign continues through Friday (Sept. 21) on campus. As we mentioned here before, members of the campus community are welcome to leave plastic-bottled messages for future generations that will be used to fill planters on the new Student Services roof plaza. The project is designed to raise awareness of the importance of recycling while allowing folks to leave a message, time-capsule style, for the UW-Green Bay of tomorrow. Full details.

Sending out an (eco) S.O.S.: UW-Green Bay’s Message in a Bottle drive

It’s the awesome, cost-saving eco campaign that already has us singing that catchy ditty from The Police — that’s right, UW-Green Bay’s ‘Message in a Bottle’ drive is here! All next week, campus community members will be invited to share their message, time-capsule style, in a plastic bottle (of the soda or water variety). These bottles will be used to help fill deep new planters as part of the student services roof remodel, thereby reducing the amount of soil purchased and calling attention to how slowly plastic breaks down (think in the four-to five-century range). There will be six collection locations around campus from Monday, Sept. 17 through Friday, Sept. 21. See our full news post for complete details — and think about what message you’d like to leave for the Phoenix of the future.

‘Message in a Bottle’ project to to preserve memories, promote recycling at UW-Green Bay

UW-Green Bay’s sustainability team is hoping the campus community gets — and gives — their “Message in a Bottle” during an awareness campaign Sept. 17-21.

The campaign involves the new Student Services plaza/roof deck, currently under construction. The plaza project will include a number of large, deep planters — some are so deep that the plants going in them don’t require them all that much soil to thrive. Rather than paying more for soil, UW-Green Bay’s sustainability and facilities management teams will reuse capped plastic bottles collected from recycling bins on campus. The bottles will add the needed volume and won’t decay for a staggering 450 years or so (maybe longer) — which serves as a reminder of what happens (or more accurately, doesn’t happen) when bottles end up in the landfill, rather than the recycling bin.

In order to add an element of fun — not to mention awareness — to the project, campus community members will be able to repurpose one of their own plastic bottles as a personal time capsule, said UW-Green Bay sustainability coordinator Laurie Case. All they need to do is rinse out a rigid plastic bottle (keeping the cap), let it dry, and then write their “message in a bottle” on a slip of paper — or express it via another medium — to be put inside. Messages can be anything — campus memories, hopes for the future, a note to future generations, poems or photos.

Participants can drop their bottles off at one of six specially marked collection bins on campus (in the Cofrin Library, MAC Hall, Theatre Hall, Rose Hall, Instructional Services and Environmental Sciences) during the week of Sept. 17-21. Project coordinators ask that you include some basic personal info — name, age, title, etc. as appropriate — so future University historians will know something about you.

“We’re reusing bottles, avoiding costs for unneeded soil, reinforcing a plastic recycling message and leaving messages from 2012,” Case said. “Future members of the campus community will literally unearth these messages the next time the roof deck undergoes reconstruction — probably 40 or 50 years in the future.”

For more information, email sustainability@uwgb.edu.