Tag: Historical Perspective Series

More Phactoids: Buried forest, teaching awards, Spielmann on ‘Noon Ball’

The countdown to our 50th anniversary continues. New since our last edition of the Log:
• About 12,000 years ago, the UWGB campus was a cool-weather boreal forest, advancing north as the glaciers retreated. Then, the glaciers came back, burying that forest a few dozen feet below the paths, trees, lawns and roads that occupy the surface landscape today. What excavators found in 1991
• It seemed like the sun always shined on outdoor commencement at UWGB (at a minimum, there was hardly a rainout for 25 years) until that streak stopped. Permanently.
• The University turns 50 this year, and Prof. Harvey Kaye’s Historical Perspectives Lecture Series turns 30 with a visit by a conservative heavyweight.
• With about 2 percent of the state’s professoriate, UW-Green Bay has excelled at winning state-teacher of the year honors, taking about 12 percent of the available statewide awards.
• The musical scene of the old BlueWhale Coffeehouse is fondly remembered by a generation of alumni.
• The old Phoenix Sports Center saw its share of pickup basketball games involving current students, alumni, faculty and staff. No less an expert than the unofficial commissioner of ‘Noon Ball,’ the retired Dan Spielmann, shares memories of favorite players.

30th anniversary of the Historical Perspectives Lecture Series

Prof. Harvey J. Kaye of the Center for History and Social Change advises campus and community to mark their calendars for two big events this fall marking both 50 years of UW-Green Bay and 30 years of the Historical Perspectives Lecture Series:

• Oct. 6, 7 p.m., Christie Theatre
 – Richard Brookhiser, senior editor of the National Review, a prominent conservative and author of biographies of Washington, Hamilton and others, will speak on “Lincoln and the Founders”

• Nov. 3, 2 p.m., Christie Theatre
 – Margaret Somers, professor of sociology and history, University of Michigan, on 20th century political economist and “economic democracy” advocate Karl Polanyi

Monday’s Historical Perspective: ‘The New Jim Crow’


Rachel Watson, a faculty member with the African-American Studies program at the University of Illinois, Chicago, is the featured guest lecturer Monday (April 20) as part of UW-Green Bay’s Historical Perspectives Lecture Series. Watson will speak at 12:45 p.m. in the Union’s Christie Theatre. Her topic is “The New Jim Crow? Figuring the Past in Contemporary Injustice.” All lectures in the series are free and open to the public.

Free talk by national columnist Nichols is set for Tuesday

Just a reminder: Nationally known political writer and journalist John Nichols will address the topic “Socialism in America” as the next installment in UW-Green Bay’s long-running Historical Perspectives Lecture Series. Nichols’ talk, free and open to the public, takes place at 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 24 in the Christie Theatre. Nichols has worked as associate editor of The Capital Times newspaper in Madison since 1993 and is a contributing writer for The Progressive and The Nation magazines. Nichols argues that while the words “socialist” and “socialism” have become widely used as smear terms in American politics, the actual application of socialist principles is rather widely accepted. Read more.
 

Socialism gets a bad rap, guest speaker Nichols will argue


Nationally known political writer John Nichols will address the topic “Socialism in America” in the next installment of UW-Green Bay’s long-running Historical Perspectives Lecture Series. Nichols’ talk, free and open to the public, takes place at 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 24, in the Christie Theatre of the University Union. Nichols has worked as associate editor of The Capital Times in Madison since 1993 and is a contributing writer for The Progressive and The Nation magazines. In his UW-Green Bay talk, it is expected Nichols will discuss themes presented in his 2011 book The ‘S’ Word: A Short History of An American Tradition… Socialism. In it, he argues that while the words “socialist” and “socialism” have become widely used as smear terms in American politics, the actual application of socialist principles can be found in successful programs including Social Security and the “sewer socialism” that stressed public works projects and the common good in U.S. cities including Milwaukee. For details.

Author Nichols to address ‘Socialism in America’

Nationally known political writer and journalist John Nichols will address the topic “Socialism in America” as the next installment in UW-Green Bay’s long-running Historical Perspectives Lecture Series.

Nichols’ talk, free and open to the public, takes place at 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 24 in the Christie Theatre of the UW-Green Bay University Union.

Nichols has worked as associate editor of The Capital Times newspaper in Madison since 1993 and is a contributing writer for The Progressive and The Nation magazines. He is regarded as one of Wisconsin’s best-known progressive political voices. The late author Gore Vidal once said of him, “Of all the giant slayers now afoot in the great American desert, John Nichols’ sword is the sharpest.”

Nichols’ work has appeared in The New York Times and Chicago Tribune, among others. He has appeared on “Bill Moyers Now” and has been a regular contributor to MSNBC with appearance on the Ed Schulz and Chris Hayes commentary shows.

In his March 24 talk at UW-Green Bay, it is expected Nichols will discuss themes presented in his 2011 book The ‘S’ Word: A Short History of An American Tradition… Socialism. In it, he argued that while the words “socialist” and “socialism” have become widely used as smear terms in American politics, the actual application of socialist principles is rather widely accepted. Many of its concepts, Nichols writes, remain alive and well in programs including Social Security and the “sewer socialism” that stressed public works projects and the common good in U.S. cities including Milwaukee.

Nichols’ most recent book, Dollarocracy: How the Money and Media Election Complex is Destroying America, co-authored with media critic Robert W. McChesney, examines what they view as the way big money and special interests are challenging the DNA of American democracy. Nichols also is the author of Uprising: How Wisconsin Renewed the Politics of Protest, from Madison to Wall Street.

The lecture series is the foremost activity of the Center for History and Social Change. First organized in 1985, the series brings in a wide variety of historians and social scientists who speak on relevant issues. It is made possible thanks to funds from the University, the Democracy and Justice Studies Student Organization, the UW-Green Bay University League and the UW-Green Bay Founders Association. Supporters hope to create an endowment for continued support of the lecture series.

The Center for History and Social Change promotes historical thought, study and discourse at UW-Green Bay and in the larger community through lectures, seminars and other campus events. It is associated most directly with the University’s academic program in Democracy and Justice Studies, and pursues its activities in relation to that program’s goals. It also works closely with other academic programs to reinforce and support UW-Green Bay’s interdisciplinary mission.

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Correction: ‘Thomas Paine’ actor to visit Wednesday

We had the date correct (Oct. 8) but not the day of the week. The UW-Green Bay’s Historical Perspectives Lecture Series will begin its 2014-15 season next WEDNESDAY with a 2:15 p.m. performance in the Union’s Christie Theatre of the program To Begin the World Over Again: The Life of Thomas Paine. See more details.
 

‘Thomas Paine’ actor to visit Wednesday for Historical Perspectives event

Please note: This post corrects an earlier version that mis-stated the performance’s day of the week.

UW-Green Bay’s Historical Perspectives Lecture Series will begin its 2014-15 season next Wednesday (Oct. 8) with a 2:15 p.m. performance in the Union’s Christie Theatre of the program To Begin the World Over Again: The Life of Thomas Paine. Dramatist and actor Ian Ruskin has brought his self-written Paine production to audiences across the country before presenting at UW-Green Bay — which is home, of course, to one of the academy’s preeminent Paine scholars in Prof. Harvey J. Kaye of Democracy and Justice Studies. Ruskin, who has worked in film and television and trained at the Royal Academy in London, references influential writings of the Revolutionary War Era firebrand including Common Sense, Rights of Man, and The Age of Reason. Admission is free and open to the public.

Paine actor, history prof to headline fall Historical Perspectives lecture events

UW-Green Bay’s long-running Historical Perspectives Lecture Series will feature live performance and academic discussion during its recently announced fall events, taking place Wednesday, Oct. 8 and Thursday, Oct. 23. During the first event, dramatist and actor Ian Ruskin will perform his original play, To Begin the World Over Again: The Life of Thomas Paine, at 2:15 p.m. in the Union’s Christie Theatre. On Oct. 23, UW-Madison History Prof. William J. Reese will speak about his recent book, “Testing Wars in Public Schools: A Forgotten History,” also at 2:15 p.m. in the Christie. First organized in 1985, the lecture series brings in a wide variety of historians and social scientists who speak on relevant issues.

Performance, literary talk highlight fall offerings for Historical Perspectives series

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s long-running Historical Perspectives Lecture Series will feature live performance and academic discussion during fall 2014, continuing a tradition that dates back nearly 30 years.

The series will kick off Wednesday, Oct. 8, when dramatist and actor Ian Ruskin performs To Begin the World Over Again: The Life of Thomas Paine. Trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, Ruskin has acted in film and television and on stage, and is currently performing his self-written Thomas Paine play across the country. The event will begin at 2:15 p.m. in the Christie Theatre of the University Union on campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

The second Historical Perspectives event of the fall semester will feature UW-Madison History Prof. William J. Reese speaking on his recent book, “Testing Wars in the Public Schools: A Forgotten History.” The book considers the controversy around written tests when they initially were adopted in the 1800s, tracing the exams’ history and political implications through the generations. Reese will take the stage at 2:15 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 23, also in the Christie Theatre.

First organized in 1985, the Historical Perspectives Lecture Series brings in a wide variety of historians and social scientists who speak on relevant issues. It is made possible thanks to funds from the University, the Democracy and Justice Studies Student Organization, the UW-Green Bay University League and the UW-Green Bay Founders Association. Supporters hope to create an endowment for continued support of the lecture series.

The Center for History and Social Change promotes historical thought, study and discourse at UW-Green Bay and in the larger community through lectures, seminars and other campus events. It is associated most directly with the University’s academic program in Democracy and Justice Studies, and pursues its activities in relation to that program’s goals. It also works closely with other academic programs to reinforce and support UW-Green Bay’s interdisciplinary mission.

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