Tag: health

Reminder: Hmong perspective on public health, tonight

Chua Xiong, director of the Brown County Department of Public Health, will speak about public health issues and the Hmong community today (Nov 2) from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in MAC Hall Room 223. She is the first Hmong public health director in the state. The talk is sponsored by the Hmong Studies Center.


After Thoughts speaker Herdman hits on all cylinders with holism and healthcare talk

UW-Green Bay’s After Thoughts is meant for learning, enrichment and fun. Tuesday evening’s speaker Associate Professor of Nursing Heather Herdman hit on all cylinders.

In front of a full house in the Grand Foyer of the Weidner Center, Herdman managed to educate and inspire while giving the audience a new understanding of the history of holism in healthcare, and why our region and our country have a long way to go.

“Holism, health and healing are inextricably linked,” she said. That doesn’t mean that one patient can rely on just one method of treatment or prevention. “After all, when there is a tragic accident, we really do want the trauma surgeon.”

“I am a nurse, and I cannot do a presentation without mentioning Florence Nightingale,” joked Herdman. “Nightingale was the first person who focused on unity and wellness and the interrelationships of human beings to events and environment. She also was the first to use statistics to prove her theories and show the outcomes — that people really do get better care with fresh air, light and quiet, for example.” Another first for Nightingale was her recognition of post-traumatic stress disorder in soldiers and the need to treat more than the physical injury.

Herdman encouraged the need to pursue integrative healthcare — essentially treating the mind, body and spirit at the same time — treating patients as more than the sum of their illnesses. Switching the model from a reductionist model where treatment is given for a symptom to a more holistic model, where prevention and treating the whole person — his or her environment, genetic history, events, situations, life stages — could wipe out some of the top most treatable and debilitating illnesses (diabetes, obesity, heart failure, asthma, for example) to the savings of billions of dollars in healthcare costs.

“Our system doesn’t pay for prevention. It needs to start focusing on paying for prevention and health promotion,” Herdman says. “And evidence-based healthcare should be the only acceptable standard.” As an example, she said that studies showed technology doesn’t always determine consistently better results. A robotics surgery may be no more effective than a surgery performed through traditional methods, but the costs of the new technology is pressuring the healthcare system to the point of financial disaster. “We can’t continue to do what we have been doing.”

Herdman said some hospitals and research centers (Mayo and the University of Minnesota, for instance) are beginning to look at holistic opportunities because solubility of the nation’s healthcare system is going to demand it. Other countries — England and Germany, for instance — have years of documented success with holistic healing.

“We need to pay for prevention, and the healthcare providers that can guide it,” said Herdman. “We need to move to evidence-based healthcare being the only acceptable standard, and we need large demonstration projects – possibly funded by philanthropists or healthcare providers that see this as the sustainable direction.”

“Integrative healthcare puts the patient at the center, focuses on prevention and is preventive, predictive and personalized,” she said.

Herdman has held leadership positions with national and international nursing organizations. She is widely recognized for her expertise in holistic care and has studied clinical aromatherapy, massage and herbal therapies.

Now in its fifth full season, After Thoughts seeks to connect members of the community with UW-Green Bay. The gatherings showcase talented women among University faculty, staff and alumni, and convene men and women after their workday for learning, enrichment and fun.

The next After Thoughts presentation will be by Professors Alison Gates (fiber arts) and Heidi Sherman (history) regarding their collaborative Flax Project — a multi-year interdisciplinary study that recreates the ancient processing of flax to linen, from seed to cloth to paper. Find out more about their upcoming presentation on the After Thoughts website.

(Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)

Busy Tuesday

The history of holism and its contrasts with our current health care system will be the topic of the first After Thoughts presentation of the 2015-16 series tonight (Oct. 6). Associate Professor of Nursing T. Heather Herdman is the featured speaker at the event 5 to 7 p.m. at the Weidner Center. With a reception, the cost is $15. Also tonight, National Review senior editor Richard Brookhiser visits via the Historical Perspectives Lecture Series to discuss his new book on Lincoln and America’s Founders. The free talk begins at 7 p.m. in the Union’s Christie Theatre.

Reminder: Employee Benefits and Wellness Fair

If this is October, the annual benefits-enrollment period must be right around the corner (starting Monday, the 5th). The Office of Human Resources has announced the date, time and place for the 2015 Employee Benefits and Wellness Fair: from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday (Oct. 7) in the University Union’s Phoenix Room. Check out the System’s changes-for-next-year info in advance and bring your questions.

Herdman to explore integrative healthcare in ‘After Thoughts’ talk Oct. 6

Associate Professor of Nursing T. Heather Herdman

Associate Professor of Nursing T. Heather Herdman

The history of holism and its contrasts with our current health care system is the topic of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s first After Thoughts presentation of the 2015-16 series.

UW-Green Bay Associate Professor of Nursing T. Heather Herdman will present “Integrative Health Care: what’s the whole holistic thing, anyway?” Tuesday, Oct. 6 in the Grand Foyer of the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Drive. Herdman plans to use her expertise in clinical reasoning and standardized language in nursing to help her audience better understand processes that are not yet part of traditional nursing or medical programs.

Herdman has held leadership positions with national and international nursing organizations. She is widely recognized for her expertise in holistic care and has studied clinical aromatherapy, massage and herbal therapies. “People are learning about and integrating essential oils, herbs, and body therapies into their daily lives and we need to be able to talk about these in an open and informed way,” she says.

Herdman received her Ph. D and master’s in nursing from Boston College and her BSN from the University of South Carolina, Columbia. She is the editor of a fundamental nursing textbook and has also authored numerous articles related to clinical reasoning, assessment, nursing diagnosis, outcomes and interventions in a variety of patient areas. She also lectures extensively on safe use of essential oils and herbs to help people use them wisely.

Now in its fifth full season, After Thoughts seeks to connect members of the community with UW-Green Bay. The gatherings showcase talented women among University faculty, staff and alumni, and convene men and women after their workday for learning, enrichment and fun.

After Thoughts begins with a 5 pm reception, followed by Herdman’s talk on complementary medicine beginning at 5:45 pm. Each After Thoughts event is located in the Grand Foyer of the Weidner Center at UW-Green Bay and is from 5-7 pm. The event begins with time to socialize, network, and enjoy hors d’oeuvres before the featured presentation.

Seating for After Thoughts is limited, so advanced registration is recommended. The cost of each program is $15. To reserve your spot, send a check (payable to UW-Green Bay Foundation) to: UW-Green Bay Foundation, CL 805, 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay, WI 54311; or register online. Walk-up registration also is an option. Call (920) 465-2074 for more information. You can find After Thoughts on Facebook. Visit After Thoughts website for more information about the series.


Miller ‘Moves with the Mayor’

UW-Green Bay Chancellor Gary L. Miller was the co-walker earlier this week at the weekly “Move with the Mayor” Challenge in downtown Green Bay. He joined Mayor Jim Schmitt and many others for a 30-minute midday walk to impact heart and your health. This week’s walk got pushed back a day by Tuesday’s deluge, but the plan is for walks each of the next two Tuesdays departing at noon from City Hall, on the corner of Walnut and Jefferson. All are welcome.

Pickleball is next Lunch ‘n’ Learn

Want to get in on the fastest growing sport in America? UWGB Director of Marketing Sue Bodilly shares her favorite pastime — pickleball — in this Lunch and Learn session from noon to 1 p.m., Thursday, July 16 in the Student Services Outdoor Plaza. Sponsored by the UWGB Wellness Committee, Bodilly will be joined by a few members of the Packerland Pickleball Players to guide you through the game, its rules, a few strategic pointers, and then allow YOU to get in on the action.  Come and see why the sport (a combination of ping-pong, tennis and badminton) is booming from coast-to-coast, and right here in Green Bay. All equipment is provided. Grab a co-worker and RSVP your attendance at bodillys@uwgb.edu.  Click here for more detail.

Power of partnership: Phoenix Athletics, Prevea make a winning team

top-story-partnershipJeremy Cleven (above) head athletics trainer for the Phoenix, is far from alone in his work despite being the only sports medicine professional formally employed by UW-Green Bay.

Take, for example, his colleague Callie Bartel, who has long been steeped in the culture and camaraderie of Phoenix Athletics at UW-Green Bay.

She’s an alumna who ran cross country with the Phoenix before graduating with a degree in Human Biology in 2009. Each day, she reports to her on-campus office and then sets about her day as an athletic trainer, working with student-athletes who want to stay at — or return to — the top of their game.

But Bartel isn’t a University employee. Rather, she’s part of an innovative partnership with Prevea Sports Medicine, a program that provides athletic trainers who are contracted out to UW-Green Bay.

“I knew I wanted to work at the college level right away,” Bartel said. “I wanted those athletes — they were there for a reason, and if they got hurt, they were going to do whatever it takes to get better.”

The partnership allows Bartel and her fellow athletic trainers — Prevea provides two others, plus two strength coaches — to work full-time with Cleven, who is employed by UW-Green Bay. It also provides Phoenix athletes with quick access to Prevea physicians as they need it, offering another big-time benefit for Division I athletes who just want to play — and play healthy.

“The community relationships are something that have really been important to them, and they have a passion for sports medicine,” Cleven said. “It’s kind of in their blood to take care of the local college athletes.”

Prevea is pleased to partner with a great University and the only Division I school in Northeastern Wisconsin, said Michael LaMere, Prevea’s Sports Medicine Outreach Supervisor. Its athletic trainers attend continuing education courses year-round to stay abreast of current trends, and the athletic training team meets frequently to review emergency and rehabilitation protocols to make sure athletes receive the highest level of care possible.

“The athletic trainers are the first line of defense of making sure the athlete is taken care of in a safe and timely manner,” LaMere said. “From a minor injury to a life-threatening injury, the athletic trainers are equipped to manage every situation that is thrown their way. With an athletic trainer on the sidelines, it helps give the student-athletes and coaches the peace of mind that they have someone right there with knowledge and skill to take care of injuries that may happen.”

UW-Green Bay’s longstanding relationship with Prevea is reflected not only on the sidelines of games and practices, but also in the very name of its training room — the Hinckley Sports Medicine Center on the lower level of the Kress Events Center on campus. The room is named after Prevea orthopedic surgeon, longtime team physician and UW-Green Bay philanthropist Dr. James Hinckley, who with his late wife Patricia received UW-Green Bay’s highest community honor, the Chancellor’s Award, in 2012.

The partnership also played a significant role in Bartel’s transition from student-athlete to athletic trainer. While a Phoenix cross country runner, Bartel established relationships with Cleven and then-UW-Green Bay athletic trainer Emily (Meeuwsen) Johnson, daughter of current UW-Green Bay Trustee Kate Meeuwsen ’76. The pair mentored Bartel and helped her land an internship with Prevea and UW-Green Bay between her first and second year of graduate school. It’s yet another example of how a longstanding partnership has paid off — for everyone involved.

“Callie’s experience has really brought a unique outlook to our sports medicine staff,” LaMere said. “Being a UWGB athlete, she came into the position with more knowledge of the University, the Athletic Department and Prevea than most would. Knowing the ins and outs really helped her hit the ground running quickly.

“Callie has always known she wanted to work with athletes, and it is great that she can continue what she started at UWGB.”

Kress Events Center advertises faculty/staff membership program

As a reminder, and as part of the University’s employee health initiative, the Kress Events Center is open to Faculty/Staff members employed in at least a 50% position for free during the following times:

Fall/Spring Semesters:

Monday through Thursday
— 6:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
— 8 p.m. to close
(closed 2 p.m. to 8 p.m.)
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday and
Summer, Winter, Spring Breaks
— Unlimited access

Must present Faculty/Staff ID at KEC Information Desk to gain access for each visit. For more membership information, visit the Kress Events Center front desk or call (920) 465-2449. For more information on facility hours and programming, visit the website.